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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This write up shows you how to press your rotors on your Bronco's and F150's 4x4's.

So you got a rotor you need to replace, and you don't want to spend the money for a rotor with a new hub. The difference in price is a lot. I pay $29.99 for a new rotor, then press off my hub from the old, and press on to the new. With the hub already on, your paying nearly $100 a piece for them.

You got to start with the old rotor fully off the truck (I'm sure there's a write up to show you how to get to this point).

First step is to knock out the studs. I'm using a 4lb hammer. Might be a little overkill, but not much effort is needed :toothless



In this picture, you can see the stud almost fully out.......but this rotor is equipped with a tone ring.


So once the studs are loose, they will then rest on the tone ring like this if you have ABS


Continue going around the studs and tapping them will a little bit of force and you'll pop the tone ring right off



Next step is to remove the hub from the old rotor (it wont be attached no more) and use the old rotor for a base to do the set up.


I put the hub into the old rotor upside down


Then I take the new rotor and lay it onto the hub


Next step is to place the studs back into the holes and take a punch and drive them in just enough to hold the rotor onto the hub. Then I flip the rotor and lay it onto the old rotor. Now, the raised part of the old rotor fits inside the new rotor and will keep the good surface away from being damaged while pressing the studs back in the rest of the way.

Next you'll need an open lug nut. It can not be a capped lug nut. Tighten it up to pull the stud a little bit through.


This will get the stud up enough to have enough threads to grab.

Now, You'll need to come up with a way to pull the studs all the way through so the shoulders are fully through. Using just the lugnut will not allow the shoulders to penetrate all the way through. You can purchase a Lisle 22800 Wheel Stud Installer which by the way has a bearing on the bottom so it spins with the lugnut:



This installer works marvelous....

Set it on the Stud as so:



And use an open lug nut to pull it through:



or this is what I use to use......

1 1/4" socket, 3/4" drive opening to allow the stud to go all the way through the socket. This socket is perfect to do this job.




And I place the socket onto the stud that already part way through


Next I put the open lug nut inside the socket onto the stud


Then I use my impact socket on the lug nut to pull the stud through


You want the shoulder of the stud to be all the way through like this


If it looks like this, keep pressing it through as its not fully seated


Here's what the stud should look like from the backside if fully seated


Here's what it'll look like if you need to keep pressing it through
Sensitive content, not recommended for those under 18 Show Content


Once they are all nice and tight, it's time to reinstall the tone ring if you have ABS. Just tap it on being careful not to use too much force.


That's it! Now they are ready to reinstall. The machine shop around my house will charge you $30 a rotor to do this simple procedure.

I hope this helps those of you that want to try this yourself. It really isn't all that hard to do and will save you a bit of money too.
 

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I myself air hammer the bottom of the studs to seat them. Probably not the correct way, but its never failed. And its way quicker then the lug nut trick.

On a side not i also use an old lug nut, thread it on part way then air hammer the old studs out too...
 

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an old lug nut on the stud would help make sure you don't damage the stud. not all studs have the little "no thread" at the end, mine don't. Also that toner, that's pretty iffy with using the stud to pop it off. That's a cast piece and it's pretty easy to break one of the little toners off, ask me how I know. And the darn thing used to be like $40, now I'm not sure Ford even stocks them anymore. A puller is a safer way.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I use a nice long brass drift to pound out the studs to avoid mushrooming the ends of the studs. Makes it a little easier too. More accurate than just using a hammer.
Agreed. This would be true if your using a smaller hammer (2lbs or less). But the brutal force of the 4lb'er, knocks them out fast with very few strokes. None of my studs showed any mushrooming, and this wasn't the first time I've done this, nor the second time to these studs.

Instead of using another socket to get the studs back in I just used a stack of washers under the lug nut.
Agreed. This works too, and most people won't have that socket mentioned above as it is for a 3/4 drive ratchet. But I love using that socket mentioned above. Fits perfectly and is a lot faster as its only a one piece tool, not several (stacked washers)

I myself air hammer the bottom of the studs to seat them. Probably not the correct way, but its never failed. And its way quicker then the lug nut trick.

On a side not i also use an old lug nut, thread it on part way then air hammer the old studs out too...
Some people don't have the luxury of air tools. I tried to impact the studs back in, but they just wouldn't seat good, and it caused a lot of noise. So I opted to do it as listed above.

an old lug nut on the stud would help make sure you don't damage the stud. not all studs have the little "no thread" at the end, mine don't. Also that toner, that's pretty iffy with using the stud to pop it off. That's a cast piece and it's pretty easy to break one of the little toners off, ask me how I know. And the darn thing used to be like $40, now I'm not sure Ford even stocks them anymore. A puller is a safer way.
My first time I took the tone ring off, I broke it.......using a puller. Ended up busting teeth off of it. Not saying someone else will or won't, but it happened to me.

If you go around the studs in equal force, it should drive the tone ring off no problems. You got to go around the studs after one or two hits to make it slide down without cocking.


Everything listed above is good advise. Some ways work better for others.
 

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I was in a pinch about a week ago and this thread saved my ass!!!! Thanks Sackman!

Only thing I did different was used an air hammer to press the studs back in. I dont like using the nuts to pull them thru cuz it will stretch the studs some, and they're gonna stretch enough over time anyways.
 

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Thanks Sackman!, I assume I would need inner bearing seals with those new rotors right....? Anything else that for sure needs to get changes on these rotors?
Thanks again
You do not need to change anything out. If the bearings and races are good, the only thing you will end up removing is just the outer bearing (mine usually falls out) so make sure to catch it. Other than that, everything in the hub (seals, bearings, races) can stay in.

Just put a little grease on the two piece wheel seal to prevent squeaking.
 

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Screw the Jeep Thing
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I've never used a lugnut to pull the studs through. Just a deep well socket and my BFH. Takes 4 or give hits each to get them fully seated. No problems.

Always seemed silly to me to buy the hub also, when you don't need to.
 

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I use a drift to hammer the studs back in. You know they are seated when the sound changes as you hit it with the hammer. I also don't condone hitting anything threaded without some protection. If the threads go to the top and you don't have a brass drift, then thread a lug nut back on that you wont miss, and start beating on it.
 

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Screw the Jeep Thing
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The end of the lug are concave and perfect for putting a small punch in if you perfer not hitting it staight on with a hammer.
 

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Cleaning the trails
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Another way to get the tone ring backon is to cool the hub (you will be asked why it is in the fridge/freezer) and heat the ring. You can either use a torch or thow it in a toaster oven on high for about 15 minutes. The hub will shrink from the cool and the heat expands the ring enought to drop on. Done it twice already with no issues.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Updated first post with the Lisle 22800 Wheel Stud Installer as my special socket that I've had for so many years has gone missing. This Lisle Wheel Stud Installer is the cats meow..... :thumbup
 

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How will you know when the tone ring is fully/properly seated/set?
 

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I bought an OEM Brand installer. It was too thick to start the studs. I ended up skipping it to install studs. May give that Lisle tool a try sometime

 

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Discussion Starter #17
How will you know when the tone ring is fully/properly seated/set?
There is a thickness difference/ridge on the hub where the tone ring will sit flush against. You should be able to see it in this picture.

 

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I just did this and also bought the Lisle 22800 to install studs.
That is a wonderful little tool and well worth the $17 if you ask me.

Sure beats all of the friction that was a result of the stacked washers I used last time I did this.
 
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