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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys. I’ve been experiencing a stall when completely warmed up, at idle, maybe once every 50 miles.
Done a lot of research on here and attempted the test where I disconnect the electrical connection from the IAC while idling and my engine stalled.

I now have my ABS light staying on (no check engine light). Used a code reader and it says no codes.

Any thoughts as to why the ABS light is staying on. Currently going to church and undid the battery to see if maybe it needs to reset everything.

Thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I’ve tried to run 4wabs tests and I get no blinks whatsoever. I went for a drive thinking maybe it just needed to reset and now MY SPEEDOMETER DOESNT WORK WTF
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Never mind everyone. Blown fuse.

Now I’m back to trying to figure out the intermittent stall. Gonna check the IAC
 

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Yo Icculus,
Now you should have a DTC.

Transmission Control Indicator Light (TCIL) is a LED and overdrive on/off switch at end of the Transmission shifter stalk; flashing OD light is an indication of a transmission related trouble code in the Powertrain Control Module (PCM).* Is it flashing?

Is odometer operative?

4WABS Inoperative (dash lights on, etc.); E4OD transmission control switch (TCIL) wiring may be misrouted causing a short in the steering column and a blown # 17 fuse for 92-96 in TSB20-7


Fuse Block Diagram in a 96
Source: by Roadkill (The Beast)

96 4WABS; PERFORM UNDERHOOD SYSTEM PRECHECK & Self Test @ 1996 Bronco/F-Series
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Got the abs light and speedometer working after I replaced the blown fuse.

Works good now.

Found that a few of my hose clamps on my vacuum lines could use a little tightening. Will see if this brings a change to the stall. Prolly check out the IAC in the next day or two also

Out of curiousity. If truck is at full operating temperature, what SHOULD HAPPEN if I disconnect the electrical connection to the IAC and it’s in park and idling?
 

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Yo Icculus,
Idle Air Control (IAC) aka Idle Air Bypass (IAB):

➡"...bring the engine up to operating temperature. Allow the engine to idle without any driver input to the throttle or pedal. Go under the hood, and disconnect the electrical connector to the IAB. If the engine begins to stubble or stalls the IAB is functional and does not need to be repaired. If the engine idle does not change you should remove the IAB for inspection." by Ryan @ https://web.archive.org/web/20161015155948/http://fuelinjectedford.com/page39.html
Read more.

The IAB can pass and still need repair, or it can fail and not need replacing. The plunger and internal spring can get clogged with dirt and oil. This will slow down the air flow and not allow the IAB to function properly. Remove the IAB and clean it. There are 2 halves to the IAB, and you can not buy just one half, but you can take it apart to clean it. But if the internal solenoid is faulty the IAB needs to be replaced.


Gacknar wrote, "I can tell you one thing, if your idle did not tank when you unplugged the IAC then one of two things happened. It's not closed all the way, the idle set screw has been jacked with or you have a vacuum leak.

Whenever an IAC component is replaced or cleaned or a service affecting idle is performed, it is recommended that the KAM (Keep Alive Memory) be cleared. This provides an Idle Relearn which is crucial to achieving a smooth idle because it permits the IAC solenoid to be brought back within its normal operating range. Disconnect your battery for at least 5 minutes to clear previously learned Idle Air Trim values. Then with all accessories off, start your engine and allow it to idle for at least 15 minutes to relearn the idle strategy. You will slowly hear your idle improve so do not be overly concerned at the beginning. That is, unless you did not test and reinstalled a bad IAC...

How to Test and Clean your Idle Air Controller (IAC) by SeattleFSB @ https://www.fullsizebronco.com/forum/23-technical-write-ups/206960-how-clean-test-your-iac.html


➡Mikey350 wrote, "I went through three IAC's before I got a good one. Send it/take it back, get a refund, buy a Motorcraft."
 

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Discussion Starter #7
So I’m pretty sure it’s not the IAC. I pulled it out at normal operating temperatures and the car died out.

I was then driving about 30 miles to dove hunt this morning doing 70 mph. The car lurches, shuts down, Check Engine Light comes on, then it all starts right back up, keeps driving, check engine light goes off all on its own. Runs fine for the next 10 miles.

Not sure what to think. I’m thinking it must be electrical.

Any ideas??
 

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Yo Icculus,
Have it tested for Codes for free at local parts store and post codes here.
Avoid autozone.

E4OD Transmission Control Indicator Light (TCIL) is a LED and overdrive on/off switch at end of the Transmission shifter stalk; flashing OD light is an indication of a transmission related trouble code in the Powertrain Control Module (PCM).
 

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Discussion Starter #9
When I plugged in my code reader I got p0320.

Looks like it’s something going wrong with the distributor most likely???????????
 

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Yo I,
Check or replace 96 Misfire Sensor (aka CPS, crankshaft position sensor). Also check wiring for corrosion or chafing etc.


No adjustment is cited by Ford,
96 Misfire Sensor, aka Crankshaft Position Sensor (CPS);
"Section 03-14: Engine Controls, Electronic
1996 Bronco/F-Series Workshop Manual
REMOVAL AND INSTALLATION
Procedure revision date: 05/18/2000
Removal:
Disconnect battery negative cable.
If engine is a V-8, proceed to next step.
Remove attaching screws and timing pointer.
Disconnect wiring and remove sensor.

Installation:
Follow removal procedures in reverse order.
Tighten attaching screws to 8-12 Nm (75-105 lb-in).


The misfire sensor is an electromagnetic inductance coil similar in operation to a camshaft or crankshaft position sensor. A four-point stator, or pulse ring, located behind the crankshaft damper generates an electrical impulse in the sensor at each 90 degrees of rotation. The powertrain control module (PCM) (12A650) monitors the sensor pulses and flags any misfire events. When a specified number of misfires occur within a certain time frame, the powertrain control module will alert the driver to the condition by turning on the malfunction indicator light (MIL).


NOTE: Misfire sensor is not required on 49 State/Canada 7.5L engine. It is required on a 7.5L California engine.
NOTE: The timing pointer and misfire sensor are serviced separately on the 5.8L engine but not on the 5.0L engine where they are serviced as one assembly.
Remove two screw and washer assemblies and remove timing pointer and misfire sensor.
Connect misfire sensor electrical connector, if equipped.

Installation View, Misfire Sensor and Pulse Ring in attached diagram."
96 Bronco Workshop Manual, partial by Ford @ 1996 Bronco/F-Series Workshop Manual

"The misfire sensor is an electromagnetic inductance coil similar in operation to a camshaft or crankshaft position sensor. A four-point stator, or pulse ring, located behind the crankshaft damper generates an electrical impulse in the sensor at each 90 degrees of rotation. The powertrain control module (PCM) (12A650) monitors the sensor pulses and flags any misfire events. When a specified number of misfires occur within a certain time frame, the powertrain control module will alert the driver to the condition by turning on the malfunction indicator light (MIL)."


CONTINUOUS MEMORY DTC P0320: ERRATIC IGNITION
Continuous Memory Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) P0320 indicates two successive erratic Profile Ignition Pickup (PIP) pulses occurred resulting in a possible engine miss or stall.
Possible causes:
Loose wires/connectors.
Arcing secondary ignition components (coil, wires, plugs, etc.).
On-board transmitter (2-way radio).*
Are any of the above present?

*Verify all 2-way radio installations. Carefully follow manufacturer's installation instructions regarding the routing of antenna and powerleads.
Yes SERVICE as necessary. Complete PCM Reset to clear DTCs (REFER to Section 2A, Powertrain Control Module (PCM) Reset). RERUN Quick Test.
No:
For No Starts:
GO to Pinpoint Test Step A1.

For Intermittent Faults:
GO to Pinpoint Test Step Z50
.

BUT FORD REFERS TO OBSOLETE Ignition Intermittent Analyzer (Rotunda 007-00075).

All others:
Loss of PIP. REPLACE PCM.

Z50 INTERMITTENT IGNITION PROCEDURE
PRELIMINARY CHECKS. When making voltage checks, a GROUND or LOW reading means any value within a range of 0 to 1 volt. Also, VPWR or COIL PWR or HIGH readings mean any value that falls within a range of B+ to 2 volts less than B+.When making resistance checks, make sure the ignition is in the key off position and the Scan Tool is disconnected from the DLC.For ICM and PCM Pin-Outs and System and Component Descriptions, refer to Ignition System in Section 1A.Equipment Required for this Pinpoint Test:
Volt-Ohmmeter (Rotunda 105-00050 or equivalent).
Ignition Intermittent Analyzer (Rotunda 007-00075).
Check sensor shield connector.
Be certain the battery is fully charged.
All accessories should be off during diagnosis.

Is vehicle prepared for equipment set-up?
Yes GO to Z51.
No REPEAT Z50.

Z51 INTERMITTENT IGNITION PROCEDURE
Key off. All accessories should be off during testing.
Select proper Overlay and Program Cartridge to match the ignition system to be tested.
Install overlay on front panel of tester.
Insert Program Cartridge into the cartridge slot (marked on the right hand side of the front panel). Make sure the cartridge is fully inserted.
Select and install the proper harness adapter to the DIST tester (distributor ignition, EI High Data Rate or 104-Pin PCM Adapters).
Verify that the Tester switches, CKP SIMULATION (EI High Data Rate only) and WIGGLE TEST are in the OFF position.
Disconnect the vehicle wiring harness from ICM or PCM.
Depress tab on connector clip to remove the ignition harness (ICM only).
Inspect connectors for dirt, corrosion, moisture, and bent or broken pins.
Clean or repair as required.
Hook Tester to ICM or PCM:
Plug male connector of tester into engine harness connector.
Plug female connector of tester into ICM or PCM.
Key on, engine off. Press Tester RESET button. The tester performs Self-Test when it is Reset or powered up. During the Self-Test, all LEDs will light and a beep will be heard.
Did the tester perform Self-Test and is the VPWR LED (ICM PWR LED for Distributor Ignition) on?
Yes For EI High Data Rate (3.0L Windstar): GO to Z53.
For Integrated EI High Data Rate: GO to Z220.
For Distributor Ignition: GO to Z53.
No GO to tester check in Z52. Forget about this one UNLESS you need it.

Z53 RECREATE THE FAULT
Key on, engine off. Observe the FAULT MEMORY and SYSTEM STATUS LEDs.
Are any FAULT MEMORY or SYSTEM STATUS LEDs on?
Yes For EI High Data Rate (3.0L Windstar):
No GO to Z54.
For Distributor Ignition: GO to Z270. GO to Z59

Z59 RECREATE THE FAULT
With the DIST connected to the vehicle, try to recreate the fault by test driving the vehicle. If the vehicle is a No Start, crank engine for 5 to 10 seconds.
Are any FAULT MEMORY or SYSTEM STATUS LEDs on?
Yes For EI High Data Rate: GO to Z60.
For Distributor Ignition:
GO to Z270. Fault NOT related to Ignition System.
No RETURN to Z1 and choose another procedure

IDONE STOPPED COPYING THE REST .because Ford yaks about using the tester
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I don’t/can’t find the CPS. I have the 5.0/302 engine and it looks like I have a distributor.

I read that if I have a distributor it means I dont have a CPS. Is that true?
 

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I don’t/can’t find the CPS. I have the 5.0/302 engine and it looks like I have a distributor.

I read that if I have a distributor it means I dont have a CPS. Is that true?
Whatever you read about having a distributor so you don't have a CPS was wrong.
Your '96 has a crankshaft position sensor, but it isn't used to generate an ignition signal, it checks for ignition misfire. See those four pulse "vanes" around he crankshaft pulley? The CPS senses the pulse "vanes" and tells that information to the PCM. The PCM then determines if the ignition is happening at the correct time. The very slight variation of the crankshaft rotation is noticed by the PCM and will set a misfire code.
Inside your distributor is a shutter wheel (called by Ford, an armature). The shutter wheel has eight slots, one of which is larger than the others and that slot is how the PCM knows it is at cylinder 1. That is what is used by the PCM to set the timing.

(I'll bet hat the reason the PCM doesn't use the shutter wheel variation is that there is too much "slop" in the distributor drive for very accurate rotational speed measurement, there is some backlash in the distributor drive gear, and some "slop" in the chain drive that drives the camshaft. Taking the rotation changes caused by a misfire directly off the crankshaft is probably much more accurate.)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I replaced the CPS sensor and sure enough, 6 miles from home it stalls in a parking lot. Next up I’m gonna have to go through all the wiring and make sure there’s no cracks or shorts.

WTH
 

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I replaced the CPS sensor
For clarification what are you calling the Crankshaft Position Sensor (CPS)?

The mis-fire detector located next to the harmonic balancer/tone wheel is not the CPS.....
 
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