Bronco Forum - Full Size Ford Bronco Forum banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
915 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
!!!DISCLAIMER!!!

See this post before attempting.



If you've ever had to replace your ignition lock cylinder on a late model Bronco, you may have ended up with two different sets of keys.

What this write up is for is to show you how to change the tumblers from your old ignition lock cylinder, into your new one, so that your old key will still work. This keeps you from having separate keys for doors, and ignition.

I used a cheap ignition lock cylinder from O'reilly's so your experience may vary slightly.

You will need:
Old lock cylinder and key
New lock cylinder and key
A very small flat-head screwdriver
Patience and steady hands.


Warning:
The pictures are very low quality, the flash wasn't working.
Take your time, if you lose the order of your tumblers you'll spend alot of time trying to figure the correct order out.
If you lose any of the OLD tumblers from the old lock cylinder, you're done.
I decided to do the writeup after I had finished, so this is once lock cylinder taken apart and put back together, sorry.
Do this one cylinder at a time, and keep all parts separated.


Insert the key and remove the center piece from the solid outer ring (you may have to turn the key)



Remove this ring from the center piece


Using your small screwdriver, remove the tumbler cover plate.


It's hard to see, but underneath is six small springs, using your screwdriver, remove them one at a time and store them safely.


Now you can see the tumblers inside their individual grooves.


When your key is inserted, and all the tumblers match up, this "key" sticks out, it's easiest to remove the tumblers if you take this out.
Lift the two retaining bars , remove springs, and key.



Using your small screwdriver, SLOWLY and CAREFULLY remove one tumbler at a time, starting from the front towards the back, and KEEP THEM IN ORDER!




On the left you can see all of the tumblers placed in order


Complete all the above steps on the new ignition lock cylinder, however since you will be using the tumblers from the old cylinder, you wont need to worry about the order of the tumblers.

Once you have done that, take the new lock cylinder center, and start placing the OLD cylinder's tumblers into it, one at a time, in the same order that they came out of the old cylinder.



It's hard to see in the pic, but now you will put each of the springs in their grooves as well.


Followed by replacing the cover plate (also hard to see)


Now you will want to put the rectangular "key" back in place, followed by the springs, and retaining bars


Slide the ring back in place:


Slide the center into the solid outer ring, being careful not to damage the black plastic piece, or the copper conductor on it.


Test the new cylinder for function and put back into your steering column. If you're patient, and take your time, it will save you paying a locksmith, and save you another key on your "already too crowded keyring."


I apologize again for the quality of the pictures.

Cheers

-Alex
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
358 Posts
Man I wish I would of seen this when I changed out my lock cylinder months back. Is there any way I can rekey my door locks with my ignition now?
 

·
Practicing Infidel
Joined
·
15,299 Posts
Man I wish I would of seen this when I changed out my lock cylinder months back. Is there any way I can rekey my door locks with my ignition now?
Take two new door lock cylinders (or used, or yours)

http://www.partsamerica.com/Product...IE&MfrPartNumber=DL15491&PartType=616&PTSet=A

into a locksmith, with your ignition key, and have him re-pin them. Ain't much at all to have him do it.

Sixlitre

p.s./
amtarsha

You've got the patience of the devil. Good write up:thumbup
 
  • Like
Reactions: jtetterton

·
Practicing Infidel
Joined
·
15,299 Posts
Wait a minute :scratchhe

My mind's still in "Mopar gear". NO ! no you can't, because Ford door key blanks are different than Ford column key blanks, so NO, no you can't.

Only Mopars can:toothless (just did it for one of the Mopars)

Sixlitre
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
915 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Wait a minute :scratchhe

My mind's still in "Mopar gear". NO ! no you can't, because Ford door key blanks are different than Ford column key blanks, so NO, no you can't.

Only Mopars can:toothless (just did it for one of the Mopars)

Sixlitre
Depends on the year, I have the same key for doors and column on my '92, however the rear window is a different key blank.
 

·
Practicing Infidel
Joined
·
15,299 Posts
Steve

you [email protected]$turd ! I'm getting dizzy ! The room's spinning and now I think I'm gonna hurl.

Screen saver save me ! I can't look away !

Sixlitre
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
277 Posts
Good write up Amtarsha, wouldn't mind trying that but the way things have been going I'd lose one of the tumblers or get them screwed around!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
358 Posts
Negative - that's an ignition lock cylinder kit. AFAIK, the only place to get the t/g cylinder is from a JY, or from a psycho like me who has a box of them. :toothless
I have a t/g cylinder,just no key for it.:doh0715:

I was just hoping that kit would give me the opportunity to have a matching key that works the ignition,doors AND the tailgate.:toothless
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
When I changed out the ignition in my 94 the dealer simply cut me a key that does the doors and ignition.Half of the key does doors the other part ignition.Nothing special.The tailgate didnt have a key so I took the lock out and took it to a real locksmith and he had me a new key in a few minutes.
 

·
Forward Some Money
Joined
·
5,054 Posts
If you've ever had to replace your ignition lock cylinder on a late model Bronco, you may have ended up with two different sets of keys.

Now you can see the tumblers inside their individual grooves.

When your key is inserted, and all the tumblers match up, this "key" sticks out, it's easiest to remove the tumblers if you take this out.
Lift the two retaining bars , remove springs, and key.



-Alex
Your writeup applies only to the 92 up Broncos. 91 and earlier are different.

The "key" you refer to above is actually called a "sidebar".
It is not necessary/recommended to remove it to remove the wafers.
It also makes it more difficult when you stick the operating key in the plug.

I applaud your intent. The only problem I might have is that I dont like to reuse old internals due to wear. Wafers are brass and get a lot of wear, so I opt for replacement. Remember that most of them are around 15 years old. Of course a Ford pinning kit is about $100-150 :whiteflag


For you other guys, the t/g lock might still be available new. I'm going to check to see if I can find any. There are a couple ways to attack it if you dont have a key.
1) replace it with a new unit.
2) remove it and take it to a locksmith.
3) take the vehicle to a locksmith.
4) on older models that use the round headed key in the glovebox/console, you can use that to take to the locksmith. I cant recall, but I think some of the newer ones didnt have locking compartments.

J. R.

PS. There is also a way of accomplishing the same thing (one key for the doors and ignition) without paying a locksmith or going through the above. It's called a "service ignition". The dealership can get you one to accomodate your old doors, but they will need the old key/keycode.
 

·
Forward Some Money
Joined
·
5,054 Posts
:wowcb:


Here's what the ~$70 Ford kit looks like, and it comes with instructions.


That kit in the picture is for the newer 8 cut Ford locks.
That is a different lock than the 92 -96 Bronco ignition and none of the parts interchange. Nor do the keys.

I must correct myself, they did use the 8 cut locks in the very later models. I have seen only a couple '96s.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
915 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Your writeup applies only to the 92 up Broncos. 91 and earlier are different.
I never said otherwise.

The "key" you refer to above is actually called a "sidebar".
It is not necessary/recommended to remove it to remove the wafers.
It also makes it more difficult when you stick the operating key in the plug.
As stated, I found it easier to remove that "sidebar" I didn't say it was required. I had no more difficulty inserting the operating key than before, and my apologies for improper terminology, how ignorant of me.

I applaud your intent. The only problem I might have is that I dont like to reuse old internals due to wear. Wafers are brass and get a lot of wear, so I opt for replacement. Remember that most of them are around 15 years old. Of course a Ford pinning kit is about $100-150 :whiteflag
Don't get me wrong, I appreciate you sharing with me what year my bronco is, correcting me on minor terminology and sharing with me that I should spend an additional $100-150 for the pinning kit, when I could use one of the aforementioned links to purchase all new cylinders for cheaper, it's just not my style, sorry.


Look, I'm not trying to be a jerk by any means, your whole post just rubbed me the wrong way. The write up accomplishes exactly what it was meant to do. Take a person with no lock smith experience (like myself,) who had never re-keyed a cylinder, through a quick process they can do, for the cost of the new cylinder, and a little time and patience. It is not intended to show a person how they can spend $100+ to save an extra key on there key ring, because to me, I'd rather be stuck with two keys.

Cheers
-Alex
 

·
Forward Some Money
Joined
·
5,054 Posts
I never said otherwise.

As stated, I found it easier to remove that "sidebar" I didn't say it was required. I had no more difficulty inserting the operating key than before, and my apologies for improper terminology, how ignorant of me.

Don't get me wrong, I appreciate you sharing with me what year my bronco is, correcting me on minor terminology and sharing with me that I should spend an additional $100-150 for the pinning kit, when I could use one of the aforementioned links to purchase all new cylinders for cheaper, it's just not my style, sorry.

Look, I'm not trying to be a jerk by any means, your whole post just rubbed me the wrong way. The write up accomplishes exactly what it was meant to do. Take a person with no lock smith experience (like myself,) who had never re-keyed a cylinder, through a quick process they can do, for the cost of the new cylinder, and a little time and patience. It is not intended to show a person how they can spend $100+ to save an extra key on there key ring, because to me, I'd rather be stuck with two keys.

Cheers
-Alex
I wasnt trying to rub you the wrong way. If you took it that way - you misunderstood. I was adding additional info (on a technical subject) that I thought might help.
1) As far as the years. There was no application given. Broncos used several configurations over the years. Other FSB members who read this might assume this applies to theirs. That's why I put that in there.

2) No, you didnt say it was required, but you show it being removed, as if no other option existed. My guess is someone who has no "lock smith experience" does not know that, and would remove it. As far as the terminology, if you called a locksmith looking for a "square key" you would get something completely different. Again, I merely added the correct terminology.

3) I never suggested you buy a pinning kit. I think if you re-read that part you might see that. I wouldn't expect anyone not in the trade to buy that. But there are other options. If you want to purchase locks to get wafers.....press on.

If you are going to write tech articles, about stuff for which you admit you have limited experience, why would you get pissy when someone else adds correct terminology, application information, or different approaches.
There was no malice nor harm in what I posted. Feel free to correct me if I post in any of your areas of expertise.

Have a super day,
J. R.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
915 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
I wasnt trying to rub you the wrong way. If you took it that way - you misunderstood. I was adding additional info (on a technical subject) that I thought might help.
1) As far as the years. There was no application given. Broncos used several configurations over the years. Other FSB members who read this might assume this applies to theirs. That's why I put that in there.

2) No, you didnt say it was required, but you show it being removed, as if no other option existed. My guess is someone who has no "lock smith experience" does not know that, and would remove it. As far as the terminology, if you called a locksmith looking for a "square key" you would get something completely different. Again, I merely added the correct terminology.

3) I never suggested you buy a pinning kit. I think if you re-read that part you might see that. I wouldn't expect anyone not in the trade to buy that. But there are other options. If you want to purchase locks to get wafers.....press on.

If you are going to write tech articles, about stuff for which you admit you have limited experience, why would you get pissy when someone else adds correct terminology, application information, or different approaches.
There was no malice nor harm in what I posted. Feel free to correct me if I post in any of your areas of expertise.

Have a super day,
J. R.
My apologies. You are correct. In my defense, I've had a rough week and felt like you were talking down to me with the whole "I applaud your intent" as if you were saying "E for Effort, but you did it wrong moron."

For everyone else, sorry for muddying up this thread, but at least you now understand my intent, simple solution for a simple problem, even though it may not be up to some peoples more rigid standards. Other options do exist for those with the money to spend.

:whiteflag
-Alex
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,894 Posts
Not sure if this is the correct place for this quesiton, but can you take your iginition to a locksmith and have him swap the tumblers out so they match the door key? Our bronco has 2 seperate keys. 1 -Square key for the ignition and then 1 round key for the doors and tailgate.
 

·
Forward Some Money
Joined
·
5,054 Posts
Not sure if this is the correct place for this quesiton, but can you take your iginition to a locksmith and have him swap the tumblers out so they match the door key? Our bronco has 2 seperate keys. 1 -Square key for the ignition and then 1 round key for the doors and tailgate.
If you are asking about the '78 in your profile... No, the keyways are different. The best you can do is find a set of locks that have the ignition key profile and pin them to match the ignition. Then all that's left is a round key for the tailgate. IIRC, I dont think Ford (Hurd) ever made an ignition cylinder with the secondary profile.
 

·
Forward Some Money
Joined
·
5,054 Posts
No, but you might be able to swap in '90-96 door lock cylinder that uses a square key, and have THAT matched to the ignition. But there is no t/g lock cylinder with a square key, or ignition with round key, so those 2 will never match.
That won't work. There are basically 3 different generations of locks and key profiles. Each have their own pinning/keying configurations.

The older '78 -91 uses pin tumblers, and the next 2 generations (92-95 & 96) use wafer tumblers. The 3 generations are completely different. Newer keys arent designed to work, nor fit, older locks and vice versa.

The only way to have an ignition/door key is the way I have in my previous post. :thumbup

I'm not absolutely sure, but I dont think a newer ignition lock will fit/function properly in an older column.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top