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2012 Jeep JKU
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all depends...on your preference...I'm mine with shackles on back since that is the way my donor vehicle had it...from what i understand by doing it on the front you are not effecting the pinion angle as much...
 

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TTB Hater of course
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If you're gonna trailer it, either way.

If you're gonna drive it on the highway much, shackle at the rear. Allows the axle to naturally swing back when you encounter an obstacle on the road at speed while driving forward.

There are arguments that a front shackle will push the axle into a ledge or whatever on the trail and thus aid performance, I don't buy it.
 

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Premium Member
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I say front shackle because it eliminates a lot of geometry problems like poor caster angle, busted pinion yokes and u-joints from bind, and driveshafts pulling apart. But as stated, there are a lot of arguments both ways.
 

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negative creep
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if you have the shackle at the front it will hit on lots of stuff. my front hanger is usually the first thing i hit on an obstacle, a shackle up there would make it even lower and you also run the risk of smacking the shackle and bending a main leaf.
 

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Shackle back if your going to drive it on the road.
 

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I'll go first
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Mr.N said:
Never mind the link is a Jeep site, it's good info.

Why or why not to run the solid mount in the back depends on your spring arch.
http://www.off-road.com/jeep/tech/susp/elkcahs/
Jason, make sure that you read this article. Especially the part on driveshaft length. I think it explains my three broken transfer cases.
 

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TTB Hater of course
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FlaMudslinger said:
Jason, make sure that you read this article. Especially the part on driveshaft length. I think it explains my three broken transfer cases.
If you're shoving your front d/s into your t-case it just means you didn't measure carefully before 'wheeling it...........and apparently didn't measure three subsequent times after that :duh
 

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Former owner of Shadofax
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TTBlows said:
If you're shoving your front d/s into your t-case it just means you didn't measure carefully before 'wheeling it...........and apparently didn't measure three subsequent times after that :duh
:histerica
 

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TTBlows said:
If you're shoving your front d/s into your t-case it just means you didn't measure carefully before 'wheeling it...........and apparently didn't measure three subsequent times after that :duh
if it was three times after that he wouldve broken his t-case 4 times

unless your under the assumption he still has it like that now, which i would be really surprised if he does, no is that stupid
 

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negative creep
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TTBlows said:
If you're shoving your front d/s into your t-case it just means you didn't measure carefully before 'wheeling it...........and apparently didn't measure three subsequent times after that :duh
ROFL
 

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Larston said:
I say front shackle because it eliminates a lot of geometry problems like poor caster angle, busted pinion yokes and u-joints from bind, and driveshafts pulling apart. But as stated, there are a lot of arguments both ways.
EXACTLY. If you run rear leafs up front anyway you will never experience this "Rough Ride" They claim but have never experienced exept for in maybe a stock F350 or something that came with stiff leafs. Clamp the rear of the leaf together correctly and you won't bend the main leaf either.

Approach angle. Well yeah you've got me there. But I'd far rather have to choose different approach angles and know that my drivetrain is in perfect alignment. Oh yeah. Drivelines are cheaper too since you don't have to buy a long slip shaft. Shackles rearward: slightly smoother ride, more expensive to do right. Shackles Forward: STRONGER. :box0715:
 

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One Cold North Dakotan
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I'm going to use some rear leaf springs from a bronco or F150 when I do my SAS, which will be relatively flat. I won't suffer from bump steer as much as as a truck with heavily arched springs, correct? Also what's the best way to eliminate bump steer other than a steering stablizer shock?

Lastly, does anyone have a pic of something that protects the shackle from rocks etc on steep approaches? It wouldn't be that hard to make, and I'm planning on it. Just would like to see some ideas first.
 
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