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Discussion Starter #1
Ok after much searching on a simple class on "how to weld" with no success... I am going to attempt to teach myself.

My questions for the welding gurus are:

1. What is a good first welder that I can get alot of use out of... I would like to be able to do bumpers, roll bars and thicker gauge steel projects eventually without having to purchase another welder.

2. Is there a preferred book to learn from?

Thanks,
NJB
 

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Zombie Hunter
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Man this topic is just about beat to death.

Do a search in this section of the forum, it's been discussed thoroughly.
 

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3 wheeler
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how far are you from leigh carbon community college. they offer welding classes. well worth the effort in my opinion makes a huge difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Sorry for not searching, I usually do ...

I am about 2.5 hours from that community college...
 

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Ex Navy Nuke
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You can teach yourself some stuff over a long period of time by trial and error but a couple hundred bucks spent on a class will teach you more in a couple months than you could teach yourself in a few years.
 

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Take a look at my post. It's a few down titled Welder Worth the cash. I was asking the same things as you. I am going to also check into the JC around me for a class. Tomorrow I am going to attempt to build a welding cart.
 

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also check with your local high school. where i live we have a vocational school for 11 and 12 grade. They also teach nite classes for adults.
 

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You have to learn to see the puddle and then how to manipulate it. If you know someone that knows how, get a hood and have them show you the puddle.

When I was about 7 my dad thru down 2 pieces of angle and told me to weld them together. It looked like a porcupine when I was done. Every time the rod would stick I'd pull it out of the stinger and start a new one. My mom still has the piece somewhere.
 

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get a welder and some scrap metal and just practice. a good welder is the hobart handler 175 i bought one and you can use it for anything from body work to frames to thicher steel. get a large gas tank or you will be getting it refilled too much. buy flux cored wire for thicker steel to get a hotter weld with more penetration similar to stick welding.
 

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i was self taught and my first welder was a gasless wire feed, upgraded to a mig with gas and it was a huge differnce. like most people here have said learning to control your puddle it the most important thing. try to use the heat and speed settings reccommended on the welder. if you can get some scrap metal to practice on just try to make some straight lines that leave and even bead. most common mistake is going to fast. hope i was some help i am still in the learning process myself, i just don't get enough excuses to break out the welder
 

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Former owner of Shadofax
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njbuck said:
Ok after much searching on a simple class on "how to weld" with no success... I am going to attempt to teach myself.

My questions for the welding gurus are:

1. What is a good first welder that I can get alot of use out of... I would like to be able to do bumpers, roll bars and thicker gauge steel projects eventually without having to purchase another welder.

2. Is there a preferred book to learn from?

Thanks,
NJB
I am not a welding guru, but rather someone that was in the same boat as you about 16 months ago.

1) I listened to several folks from here that had been welding a while, and bought a new Hobart 175 (which is 220V). For your planned projects a good 220 machine is critical. This was the single biggest factor to my present happiness. The wire feed Hobart I bought made learning to weld very easy. it was not long before I used up my gasless spool and bought a big ol 11lb spool, 80 CU bottle and started in with the mig. If you can't afford one of these units, then next best bet would be a good stick welder, which is half the price.

2) book, dunno, never picked one up. IF you get a new hobart or any good machine, the manual will have tips in the back...analyzing your bead by the look, proper penetration, heat/pooling, and how to adjust these items by use of wire speed and amp selection.
 
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