Bronco Forum - Full Size Ford Bronco Forum banner

161 - 165 of 165 Posts

·
Registered
'92 Custom w/ '95 MAF 5.0, 33's, 4.10 LSD
Joined
·
2,514 Posts
Discussion Starter #161
Ah, only trimming just that little bit will absolutely not make it 30% weaker. It will provide an opportunity for a crack to form though. Unlikely, but possible.
Welding in a new transition would probably be wise, for that purpose. Give the perch the rear side strength above the crossmember instead of below.

I found the explanation behind the, uh, reversible reverse lights switch. Purple/Orange is power to the switch (12V with key ON), and Pink/Black is switched power out of the switch. Because it's basically just a contact toggle, it doesn't care which side is in and which side is out. The wires in turn come from and go to a designated spot in their connector on the fender liner, so they also don't care which side of the switch the signal is coming from. Makes perfect sense now.

The tail lights get their ground (Black) further back, apparently.

Now I just need to go test those conditions... Knowing it's key switched will make for much easier testing, as I should be able to do it myself with the engine off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
731 Posts
@fodder, put the transmission in Reverse and check continuity through the switch. It should read 0.00 Ohms... if you read anything other than 0.00 Ohms, you need a new RL Switch. If you have 0.00 ohms, do your dash lights work? It’s possible that the problem is in a connection with the multifunction switch (turn signal switch) or the headlight switch. Something as easy as a connector that didn’t get pushed in all the way.
 

·
Registered
'92 Custom w/ '95 MAF 5.0, 33's, 4.10 LSD
Joined
·
2,514 Posts
Discussion Starter #163
Just got done playing with the wiring and got it working. It was the switch that was the issue.

With key ON and shifter in Reverse, I had 12.16V on Purple/Orange at both the fender liner junction and the switch itself, so I knew I could successfully back probe and get a reading. I was getting nothing on Pink/Black after several tries, but you never know if it's really reading zero or just an unsuccessful back probe... So, I tried out the spare switch I picked up at the JY today (the lone donor in the yard), leaving the back probe in the same spot as the last try, and immediately got 12.16V.

With that, the reverse lights were on, and I could easily test functionality by shifting in and out of Reverse. I never realized the vehicle doesn't need to be running to test the reverse lights...

The one thing I did with the spare switch and not the original was goop it up with dialectric grease. I've read that they don't make the best connection and sometimes require wiggling. So, it may be that the original would also work with that treatment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
812 Posts
Glad to see you got your clutch hydraulics figured out. I went through the same process recently. It took me a long time to bleed the clutch slave/master cylinder. I think the trick for me was pumping the clutch pedal 20 or so times then opening the bleeder. Or maybe I used my vacuum bleeder...

I'm not sure what the deal is with the different clutch hydraulics. I'm using a ~92 Ranger clutch master cylinder on my '86 Ranger with a Zf5. Lol

I was going to suggest that if you take off the arm on the clutch pedal (where the clutch slave cylinder rod attaches to) and dont put it back on the correct orientation (its splined) you might not get full disengagement
 

·
Registered
'92 Custom w/ '95 MAF 5.0, 33's, 4.10 LSD
Joined
·
2,514 Posts
Discussion Starter #165
Glad to see you got your clutch hydraulics figured out. I went through the same process recently. It took me a long time to bleed the clutch slave/master cylinder. I think the trick for me was pumping the clutch pedal 20 or so times then opening the bleeder. Or maybe I used my vacuum bleeder...
I never did try the vacuum bleeder approach...probably should have. It sure is a finicky system... I drove it out your way yesterday (gotta stop by one of these days and check out your new setup!), and it felt like the pedal pressure was improving. I'd like to measure the throwout bearing travel again and see if maybe that's approaching the 0.4" range through normal use.

I'm not sure what the deal is with the different clutch hydraulics. I'm using a ~92 Ranger clutch master cylinder on my '86 Ranger with a Zf5. Lol
You have a ZF5 in a Ranger?? Overkill much? :) Let me guess, you managed to fit a Cummins in there, too?! I don't know whether Ranger hydraulics changed midstream like F150/Broncos did, but being a ZF5, that's probably platform independent. '92 seems to be a forgotten year in terms of hydraulics. '87-91, 93-96...

I was going to suggest that if you take off the arm on the clutch pedal (where the clutch slave cylinder rod attaches to) and dont put it back on the correct orientation (its splined) you might not get full disengagement
The bushings on my pedal set looked perfect, so I just cleaned up surface rust and painted it, and left those alone for that reason...no need to replace the one-time usage splined arm. Until now, I hadn't considered the possibility that a previous owner took the arm off and repositioned it wrong, but that seems moderately unlikely. It lines up well with the extended arm, and pushes it into the clutch safety switch housing almost all the way to the eyelet.
 
161 - 165 of 165 Posts
Top