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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I will probably get bashed for asking this but I really needed to know from the sas guys. I just want some opinions on whether or not the sas is worth it for me to do? I don't wheel a whole lot and when i do its not anything real difficult. I also tow my 22ft boat quite often with the bronco. I am just tired to the alignment problems of the ttb. So should I do an sas or just use the money on building up the ttb to make it more durable? And if an SAS is in my near future is there a difference between coils or leafs for towing or minimal lift?

Thanks for the advice
bew8484
 

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MikE2 said:
I think for a daily driver a SAS is the best thing you can do.

I would say yea, it's nice, but it's expensive, you'll have a lot of work to do to prepare, and if you aren't mechanically inclined and ready for the work, I'd pass on this.
 

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i say go for it. a sas is about the same price as a top-of-the-line TTB lift with all the options. Only thing is that with the SAS you'll have to run about 6" of lift...that's pretty much the recommended minimum.
 

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bew8484 said:
I will probably get bashed for asking this but I really needed to know from the sas guys. I just want some opinions on whether or not the sas is worth it for me to do? I don't wheel a whole lot and when i do its not anything real difficult. I also tow my 22ft boat quite often with the bronco. I am just tired to the alignment problems of the ttb. So should I do an sas or just use the money on building up the ttb to make it more durable? And if an SAS is in my near future is there a difference between coils or leafs for towing or minimal lift?

Thanks for the advice
bew8484

Tough call,,,,, I would not spend much money on the TTB ....
The sas will cost expecially after you change tires etc...
read all the sas threads and see if you have tools or friend with tools to do it.
if you do not wheel to he point you need it well .......
if you do not have dreams about the rubicon and other areas ....well.......

if it is just to tow the 22 ft boat a used 2 wheel drive is cheep

and if after your done thinking - if you still want to do it - I have a completly built, never used D44 arb & 5:38 8 lug set up I will sell you - promise it will be cheeper than you building one - sorry I had to add this part :thumbup it is just sitting in the garage and the wife will agree on a spare axle shaft, but she is asking why I need a whole complete spare axle? I am running out of reasons.
:beer
 

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Dead Horse
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dumb noob question, im pretty sure you still have to get a straight axle aligned dont you? i just never hear anyone talk about getting an alightment.
 

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JB said:
dumb noob question, im pretty sure you still have to get a straight axle aligned dont you? i just never hear anyone talk about getting an alightment.
That's because no one bitches about 15 minutes in the driveway with a couple sticks and a steel rule. Yes, that's what it takes to align a SAS, you only tweak the toe in.

An SAS on a daily driver would be a fantastic upgrade. However, there's no such thing as a "mild" one. Even with 4" lift springs, the pumpkin whacks the engine crossmember on dips and speed bumps. If you try it with low lift, be sure to factor in the cost and time to clearance the engine crossmember. (Shouldn't be more than cutting a three or four inch hole in the flat part of the crossmember.)
 

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So, the common think here is that if I can afford an SAS I should do it... No matter what? It´s so big the difference? how much changes the cornering performance of the truk when you change from Stock "all" to a 6" lift and a SAS with... for example 33" tires?
 

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negroccs said:
So, the common think here is that if I can afford an SAS I should do it... No matter what?
I'd say so. But only if you have the ability to do it.

negroccs said:
It´s so big the difference? how much changes the cornering performance of the truk when you change from Stock "all" to a 6" lift and a SAS with... for example 33" tires?
They drive and handle much better. My F150 with 36" tires, 7"/9" suspension lift and a 2" body lift corners better than the truck did stock with the old TTB front end. Biggest improvement is when your on rough roads or hit bumps in the road at high speeds. Thats where the TTB sucks at. The solid axle is nice and straight in that situation and you don't have to constantly correct the steering of the truck to keep it between the lines.
 

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That's because no one bitches about 15 minutes in the driveway with a couple sticks and a steel rule. Yes, that's what it takes to align a SAS, you only tweak the toe in.:thumbup

yep. If you do your job on install, alignment is easy. I never took mine in, though I use the more elaborate "screws in tires" and tape measure to do mine.
 

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woodydog said:
. . .

if it is just to tow the 22 ft boat a used 2 wheel drive is cheep
True, but a boat ramp can be slicker than pig shit and a limited slip or better, a selectable locker may be needed. It also depends on the type of boat. For example, a 22ft sail boat with an extending tongue sucks without enough truck and traction.

The best tow rig I have is an 86 crew cab F350 dually with 460. But on some boat ramps it sucks.
 

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Larston said:
Caster on a straight axle is not part of normal alignment.
Really? I always check caster, camber and toe.



Larston said:
It's an engineering setting.
Right, and aren't we re-engineering the front end of our truck's? The length of the leaf, the arc of the leaf, the positioning of the hanger, and the postitioning of the shackle will effect the caster. IMO, this is very critical to check, even on a trail truck.
 

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bronco boy said:
Really? I always check caster, camber and toe.




Right, and aren't we re-engineering the front end of our truck's? The length of the leaf, the arc of the leaf, the positioning of the hanger, and the postitioning of the shackle will effect the caster. IMO, this is very critical to check, even on a trail truck.
Yeah but the caster you set only once - when you install the axle. Tow is the only setting you will have to worry about after that. If you check the caster and its off, you bent something or broke something. And that should be noticable right away anyways
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
A little cutting on the crossmember and the tools definitely don't worry me. And as inclined as I may be (or my help) I have never seen the sas done right in front of me, and from all of my reading I just want to make sure it's done right. So it sounds like I have a lot more reading to do. There won't be any effects as far as which style I choose though right. I think I am leaning more towards a coil setup. And the boat is a cuddy cabin. Pretty heavy for the length the bronc has never let me down. Thanks for the help guys.

bew8484
 

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MikE2 said:
Yeah but the caster you set only once - when you install the axle. Tow is the only setting you will have to worry about after that.
Again I say, really?



MikE2 said:
If you check the caster and its off, you bent something or broke something. And that should be noticable right away anyways
What about after the leaf/coil settles? Or three years down the road when one is sagging? Or (this is my favourite), the customer comes to you after he did his own SAS and complains of random DW; as all he checked was the toe? ;)
 
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