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I found my York 210 compressor nearly a year and a half ago (haven't seen another at the JY's since) on an '83 Dodge Ramcharger, collected most of the parts for assembling the OBA system, then went through endless brainstorming and stalling cycles for how and where to mount it. It wasn't until shortly after completing my MAF conversion that I began to see a potential solution. Spoiler: stock location, stock belt!

I had previously stripped my non-working A/C and put a bypass pulley in its place. That spot is the obvious location for a York install, but I've yet to see anyone figure out how to route the air intake tube...other than going full DIY on the tube itself. I didn't want to resort to a bunch of 90 degree bends in the intake tube, open air boxes squeezed in, etc., so that was out. I kept trying to make the smog pump idea work, but access would be soooo difficult, air hose routing around the belt and fan somewhat risky, and monitoring oil levels (*) virtually impossible. I looked at the feasibility of using a 4G alternator and bracket from a V8 Explorer, or a V6 Mustang with the 3G alternator and tensioner on the driver's side, but never really got anywhere with that. It looked like there might be just enough height to mount the York vertically if cutting off the top portion of the stock AC/PS bracket, and using some of the block's extra bolt holes to secure the York on a custom add-on bracket. But, if going to that trouble, rumor has it there are non-A/C Saginaw PS brackets that might be a better starting point. (I haven't found any pics.) But...the Saginaw PS reservoir sits further forward (narrower body) and would be fully covered up by the York, so I would need to have a remote reservoir modification. You can see how I kept going in circles, as the months ticked away...

(*) Oil levels may be irrelevant, with newer stuff I found saying that it may be best to run a York at half or less the recommended oil level for non-A/C use...

Installing the MAF intake tube gave me a glimmer of hope that there might be enough room below it for a 45 degree mount, keeping the AC/PS bracket intact. Fortunately, my York is a right hand suction model, meaning it can be angled to the left, keeping the suction port higher for less oil discharge. (I also did the Oil Mod to help with that.) I whipped up a template to see if the York could squeeze in:





The York and stock A/C's bolt patterns are just different enough to be annoying. My approach was to make two thin sheets to fit the respective patterns, then mate them together with as thin of a spacer as would allow the bolt heads to slip in between. The idea was to bolt the whole thing to the York, slide it into place, and bolt it down to the bracket. That's where the slotted holes come in. I knew the bottom two holes would be covered up by the York (how do you bolt up a single plate from opposing sides??), but the top two looked like they would have direct access where the York tapers in up top.

Not quite enough clearance under the intake tube, but close enough to be promising...



Okay, time to get creative! I compared my old Speed Density intake tube to the MAF tube, and it sure looked like I could gain more clearance by cutting off the appropriate length of the former's twin tubes, turn the Y-pipe of the latter from vertical to horizontal, and mate the two up...





Above... Pic #1: standard MAF intake tube setup. Pic #2, SD intake twin tubes chopped and connected to the MAF tube, which is rotated 90 degrees. I tried to get the camera angle as consistent as possible, to show the extra clearance gained below the tube.

I didn't take a picture, since my hands were occupied with holding the heavy compressor in place with no impediments wedging it like before, but that gave me just enough clearance. I had to adjust the York 9mm further forward [than the mock-up] for pulley alignment, but everything else looked spot on. At that point, I realized I had another problem: I have no idea how to weld the spacers deep into such a thin section between the two plates. I thought about just welding the outer edges, but I'd rather not risk a failure that would put the serpentine belt out of commission. I'm still a very novice welder. I looked through my scrap piles, I mean, piles of future inspiration, and found part of an old projector mount, made out of two pieces of angle iron situated in a z-shape. It was only welded in 3" sections and was designed to hold 150 lbs to the ceiling, so I knew I was in business if I welded the full length and sides. I started by cutting it down in height to closer approximate the wood mock-up:







I slotted the two lower bolt holes, since there still wouldn't be any way to get to them. It would have been less work to slot them from the top, but I wanted the lower bracket to help support the compressor's weight, rather than just tighten it down. It works pretty well -- put the bottom two bolts in first, threaded out just enough to slip over the angle iron, then put in the top two bolts and tighten everything down. The front lower bolt can be reached from alongside the pulley, but the back lower one is a challenge. I tried an offset wrench but didn't have enough height for it. A long handled or s-bend wrench might work. I just lightly cinched it down for the time being, angling in a box wrench. Here it is installed:



Pulley alignment; measure a hundred times, drill once:



PS reservoir clearance; just enough room to remove the cap:



Smog pump bypassed...later removed once my long shot hope was confirmed that the bigger diameter York pulley, in addition to being offset more toward the driver's fender, would allow the stock belt to be used. It remains to be seen if a fresh belt will fit, but there's a little room to spare on the tensioner's range with the old belt, so I think it'll be okay:



Loads of clearance (hah!) under the modified MAF tube:



Last but not least, here's the initial version of the pancake tank plumbed in:



I was originally going to either bolt the tank down to the fender liner, or use push pins to secure it. I decided that would be too difficult to reach 2 of the 3 legs, so I just zip tied it down through existing holes from the old vacuum canister and smog breather thingy. Another zip tie attaches to the battery tray, making it very secure if not attractive. Black zip ties might replace the white ones at some point.

It worked quite well right off the bat, filling up the 1 ga tank in 14 seconds. That was with the Tru-Flate 41-135 in-line regulator/gauge that turned out to be a waste (and one of the most expensive items I purchased)...I suspect the York is capable of sub-10 seconds. The regulator's adjustment knob spins endlessly, with no detents or markings. I had bought it more than a year ago at Ace, so I didn't feel good about asking for a refund, but I did go in to check if I just got a bad one or if that's how they work. Sadly, that's how they work, to the surprise of the staffer. It's just a ball valve with the resistance of a hockey puck on ice... Unless you think to mark the direction of full open before threading it on, you can only guess at the knob's position by the resulting pressure readout, which generally isn't even all that reliable or consistent. Long story short, it's unlikely I had it full-open for the initial test. (It also bears pointing out, I started out by following multiple write-up's directions to put the regulator in front of the tank. In hindsight, and having later seen write-ups contradicting that line of thought, that makes no sense. If you regulate it down pre-tank, the pressure switch never hits its 120 psi cutoff point, so the compressor keeps pumping despite being throttled back. Of course, the crappy Tru-Flate would probably spin freely and open back up, so call it a safety feature like Veyron tires only lasting 12 minutes at top speed, but the car running out of fuel in 9 minutes.)

Knowing it all worked, I could turn my attention to finalizing the smaller details. Version 2 of the plumbing is: York discharge 1/2" barb to 1/2" heater hose, to 1/2" brass barb w/ 1/4" NPT female end, to QD coupler, to 3' hose with 1/4" NPT male ends, to QD coupler, to 1/4" NPT check valve, to 3-way 1/4" NPT tee into tank and out to air line, to 1/4" NPT 90 degree elbow, to 1/4" NPT regulator, to QD coupler for air line. I found one leak with the initial setup, which turned out to be the 3-way tee; the only fitting purchased at Harbor Freight. I replaced it with a similar looking, petite little tapered Kobalt piece from Lowe's, and it cracked early in tightening it onto to the elbow. Barstock only for now on! So much for buying local. I decided to separate the regulator and pressure gauge duties after the Tru-Flate disappointment, adding a 1/8" NPT tee to the tank to run the pressure switch and safety valve together, leaving one spot for a 1/8" back mount gauge. That lets me mount the pressure switch horizontally, making it easier to fashion a weather seal for it. Wiring will be shortened to and from the circuit breaker once its position is finalized and it has a better mounting plate.





With the new fittings, I timed it from zero to 120 psi in 9.3 seconds, supporting my sub-10 hunch. That'll fill a tire fast!

Parts list: Viair 90100 pressure switch (90/120 psi), generic 50A inline circuit breaker (car audio style) w/ manual disconnect, Conrader SRV250-1/8-150 safety valve, Kobalt 0896796 in-line air flow adjustment (aka regulator), Campbell Hausfeld FP2028 1 ga tank (10.8" round x 5.7" high) & manual drain on bottom, Dixon Valve K4DC coupler dust cap, Four Seasons 47959 clutch/pulley, Milton ColorFit industrial-style couplers, HF 90 psi air/oil separator (might give the 150 psi Neiko 30253A a try). I might replace the 3' air hose with a braided SS leader hose, but I didn't experience any heat from the compressor in short tests, so I may back burner that item and see if it proves to be necessary. The initial run from the compressor barb to the coupling would still be rubber, but I view that as a sacrificial component prior to the fittings which should act as a heatsink. I opted for the manual circuit breaker instead of a switch and gauge wired into the cab, since I'll be by the tank any time I want it running. The only good reason I can see to complicate the setup is if I wanted to add air horns.

I sold my original v-belt clutch and pulley to offset some of the cost of the Four Seasons 6-groove replacement. Be cautious with those that you don't reverse the wiring (green = +12V, white = ground), or you'll blow the non-serviceable resistor... Mine wasn't labeled. Also, I struggled with multiple vendors to get to the bottom of general fit issues with the Airsource 5030 I started out with. It turns out there is a Super-Compact (101.6mm x 79.4mm) and Heavy Duty (115.9mm x 86.3mm) model, apparently only known in the York documentation (pgs 4-5). I think the smaller setup is for 209 models, but no one I contacted could differentiate part numbers between the 209 and 210. Delphi Weatherpack 1-pin round connectors from '01-02 Suburbans fit the de-pinned Four Seasons 47959 clutch wires perfectly. I didn't have the vehicle side of the 2-pin connector the clutch was designed for. (Stock York clutches ground through the body; the Four Seasons has a ground wire.) I later found the same connectors in a 2-wire setup on a Cherokee for a cleaner install.

Another barely (being generous) documented thing is the different kind of discharge/suction ports on various Yorks. Mine is a "F" for flanged (as opposed to rotolock or tube o-ring), but flanged came in barbed (like mine) and threaded, and all the hook-up examples are of the latter. I wonder if anyone had tried shaving down the barbs to allow a compression fitting to slide over?

I'll be taking the mounting bracket off in the spring to paint a few projects once the weather is suitable. (The projector mount was painted black. I sanded off enough for a good ground while welding.) If people are interested in replicating my approach, I can try getting some measurements at that time.

K.I.S.S. hose and fittings strain relief, using a magnet hook:



An alternative I might explore is to do away with the tank, which is mostly just there for reserve capacity and ease of hooking everything up (plus, I had the perfect spot for it!), and replace it with a simple air manifold. Build it into a tray in the same space that the hose can be coiled around and left hooked up all the time. The hose probably wouldn't hold up well to engine bay heat over time, though.

Full-size pictures at: https://www.supermotors.net/registry/28006/87943
 

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ate lug
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Thats a really slick York mount :thumbup

I wouldnt ditch the tank; The 210 is a pretty powerful compressor for its size, but youll still want some kind of reserve tank otherwise even the smallest air leak will cause the pump to short-cycle. If you have an ARB, youll want a tank to keep from having a pressure drop in the ARB; thats pretty much the only way youll damage one.
When i built mine, i ran an air chuck to the front & back of the truck so i dont have to open the hood to use it, and enroute to the rear chuck, added a 3 gallon tank under the rear bench seat:



its dead space anyway, and gets it tucked up safely out of the way.

Not sure what you paid for that serpentine clutch, but you can get the 1-wire version from Ryder (its not cheap):
https://www.ryderfleetproducts.com/airsource-5030/ac-clutch-5-7-8-dia-6-groove-1wire-p-mei-5030
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I like that central tank mount much better than the dual bumper tanks and the complexity of multiple pressure switches (or relying on one switch to measure pressure across all the components, meaning no check valves after the manifold). I looked at that space for that purpose, and even for the possibility of a central winch mount, but decided to keep it free for possible storage space down the road.

I see your point about undue cycling without a reserve tank. My thinking was, if I'm using it to fill a tire, it'll be basically pumping the York's full volume straight through, with the pressure switch staying constantly engaged. Since I have it on the manual disconnect, it'll only run when I want it to. But yeah, while running, the tank gives it a little extra margin of error for something as simple as stopping to check tire pressure before filling it further.

The Ryder clutch/pulley is the first one I looked at, but after the bolt pattern discrepancy problems, they couldn't/wouldn't answer what theirs is, so I had no interest in purchasing from them even if it's the right one. I'd rather give my money to someone who will put in the effort.

With the v2 fittings, it seemed like pressure dropped pretty quick to 110 psi after yesterday's initial fill-up. I checked this morning, and it had only dropped to 90 psi after 16 hours. That's much better than expected. There's probably only a tiny leak somewhere that seated itself better overnight...we'll see if the soapy water trick will be enough to reveal it, with that small of a loss.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The tank still isn't quite holding pressure, but it's getting closer. It's losing maybe 10 psi a day now, which is probably a negligible amount of air relative to the 1 ga capacity. There's not much left to check, other than the tank itself, the check valve (completely air tight to blow against, nearly impossible to blow into at less than 1% of the compressor's psi), and the output coupler's guts. I made a simple mounting plate for the circuit breaker and tidied up the excess wiring:



Conveniently, the threaded holes on the tank's handles match common automotive hardware (probably M8x1.25, but I didn't check what I pulled out of the spare bin). I need to get some shorter bolts for holding the breaker down to the plate...I only had 3/8" and 1" to choose from in 6-32; one was too short and the other needed washers to not bottom out on the tank.

Here's a wide view of the tank and plumbing, to get a better sense of how it fits into the space:



Edit: The "OEM" (terribly confusing name for a brand, but they generally make good tools) outlet coupler was leaking. I had to watch it for 5+ minutes before bubbles appeared. Whoever said a watched fitting doesn't bubble, clearly doesn't know what they're talking about... I replaced it with one of the color matched Miltons and the leak is down to 5 psi a day. I may just have to live with that, as I can't spot any more issues.

Edit 2: Actually, it may be solved. The pressure switch kicks off at an indicated 120 psi, and the gauge drops quickly to 110 psi before settling there. My home compressor does something similar, despite being below the safety valve set point, but I'm not sure what the mechanism would be. Anyway, the 5 psi drop the other day put it at 105 psi, but checking again a day or two later, it was at 110 psi. So, it could be inconsistency in the gauge, but more likely, it's a time of day thing and the pressure is reflecting the temperature. Today's afternoon reading was around 50 degrees, while the 105 psi reading was in the morning and ~10 degrees cooler. The tank fill-up for that test was later in the day.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I found a right-hand suction York 209 today with flange-style flare fittings, on an old Mercedes. (Like on my 210, it had the bigger diameter port on the Suction side, which makes the most sense to me but contradicts everything I've read. You can't push more air than you pull in, but maybe a bigger diameter discharge line would reduce pressure on the hose.) Now to find the right flare-to-NPT adapters and eliminate the potential weak link of trying to clamp a hose onto the oddball diameter barb. I took it to a hydraulic shop last week and even they had no idea what size hose the flange/barb was intended for. It's too big for a 3/8" hose and too small for 15/32". It's possible there's a size in between, but then you'd have to match it up to a barb at the other end, which would be a challenge.

The tank is holding pressure, per the edits in the last post. If I were to decide I wanted to add something frivolous like air horns, I could probably get a few toots out of them without wiring the tank up to the cab, knowing it'll be at full pressure from whenever it was last filled.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I didn't know they're the successor to Kilby. I've looked at their stuff awhile back, but wasn't terribly impressed by the value. I guess that makes sense then, since price was the common, and only, complaint of Kilby's stuff! In fact, my notes alongside my saved link for "c u off road" is:

"expensive, but has everything needed"

Anyway, that's a solid Plan B, but I'd rather stick with the stock fittings, now that I've hunted down the desired type. I went back by the hydraulic shop and they had the proper 1/2" female flare to 1/2" male NPT swivel adapter (would need another adapter to step down to 1/4" NPT), for a rather butt puckering $20. A bit more probing came up with a better option, but I have to wait till tomorrow for the part to come in: $50 for a 36" braided stainless hose with a 1/2" flare fitting at one end and 1/4" NPT at the other end. It would be tough to get an iffy quality braided hose (~$35) and flare fitting for any less than that, let alone having it professionally made.

That'll replace the 36" rubber hose and give me a good heat sink all the way to the tank. It'll unscrew easily at the compressor end -- much easier than dealing with reinforced rubber hose over long barbs, so no need for a QD coupler there -- and have the QD coupler at the tank still. I'm still puzzled by everyone saying rubber hoses won't stand up to the York's heat, yet both the Dodge and Mercedes I found them on used precisely that. The only answer I can come up with is that the freon normally in the system is cooling the discharge air, making that a non-issue? I would think that step occurs in the condensor, but I'm rusty on my A/C path stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
There was some confusion over what parts were to have been ordered and assembled for my custom hose, but they had the parts in stock to re-do it properly once the first one was a flop, and they only charged me $29, well under the original $50 quote. That was a pleasant surprise.



Flare flange port on the discharge side, barbed flange port on the suction side; best of both worlds, with ease of slipping on any off-the-shelf filter, and not having to wrestle with reinforced hoses over barbs:



The Jeep Cherokee 2-wire connector (same pins as the Four Seasons clutch) is visible in front of the MSD cap & rotor:



I should probably add some split loom where the SS hose crosses through the spark plug wires... I thought about passing it through the intake manifold's vertical slot (for access to the infamous middle torx bolt), but the 1/4" NPT fitting wouldn't quite fit through. I wouldn't want to have to remove the fitting any time needing to separate the hose from the manifold. One nice thing about the York flange fittings, as opposed to the tube-o and the cuoffroad flange fittings (from the looks of the one tiny picture) is you can rotate them before tightening them down. That helps angle hoses and filters where you want them for cleaner routing and/or strain relief. Although, you can't rotate the ports far before they bump up against the bolts.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Another small update... My neighbor loved the setup, but one of his comments kept nagging at me: Is there any way to hook the suction port up to the stock air intake instead of using the breather filter? I thought about tapping into the oil cap vent line, but reading up on it a bit, that sounds like a bad idea with MAF, because that needs to be metered air after the sensor. Probably not a big deal since the compressor would only be running at idle, but if I ever modified it to be triggered from the cab, it might be a valid concern.

Looking at my spare air box, I decided I could work with the blank where SD boxes have the filter for the oil cap vent line. The structure is there already, so I drilled a hole and added a grommet and nylon elbow barb. It's a very snug fit and there's virtually no weight on the cutout, so I think it'll hold up well. It would require some very intentional force to remove.



Inside view:



And my supply of 1/2" silicone hose arrived today to connect it up:





I flipped the suction port around to point out the front, as that allows for a gentle sweep up and over the intake tube, with no elbow necessary. It looks slightly odd running over the tube like that, but it eliminates any chance of rubbing on the belt, and it takes all the stress off the hose at both connections, so kinking of the single-ply hose is very unlikely. I'll probably fashion a little support bracket for it on the top rear MAF housing bolt, and maybe get some 3/4" pinch clamps to replace the lightly tightened worm clamp.
 

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is that the hose running to the valve cover at the oil filler neck? if so that hose should be filtered.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
is that the hose running to the valve cover at the oil filler neck? if so that hose should be filtered.
No, it's the suction hose for the York. The hose from the valve cover goes directly to the air intake tube on MAF setups and is visible between the suction and discharge ports in the last photo above.

(Unless there's an inline filter I've never seen a photo of, the MAF oil neck hose doesn't get filtered like the SD one. I've read in general that a steep climb keeps virtually all the oil from going anywhere, allowing it to function as just a metered vent. I actually did some measuring last week with blocks of wood and it appears I have just enough hood clearance to flip the y-pipe upside down and run the oil neck hose to the top of it instead of the bottom, which would make the climb even steeper.)
 

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Good source and write up. I have probably 10 York’s, but don’t want to pull the trigger on that pulley until my Sanden dies. They want a pretty penny for them.


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Discussion Starter #13
I have probably 10 York’s
No wonder they're so hard to find! :)

but don’t want to pull the trigger on that pulley until my Sanden dies. They want a pretty penny for them.
I'm surprised there isn't a stronger market of people updating the v-belts to serpentine pulley & clutch. That ended up being the biggest expense of the project, and also the most difficult to sift through the misinformation.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
This is only loosely related to the thread, and certainly not a direction I would go, but too unique of an alternative to not share:



Interesting mobile OBA setup I saw in a craigslist ad, using a starter solenoid and starter motor to power a York directly, complete with cooler and fan, quick connect battery terminals, etc. I'm not seeing what they did for a suction line, though, as that port looks to be capped.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Wandering the junkyard today, I noticed a passenger fender liner tray on a big block F250 (brick nose) that I'd walked by for months.





I figured that would be an easy way to finish up the last amateurish aspect of the setup, replacing the zip ties that held the tank to the fender liner. Unfortunately, my fender liner's holes didn't line up with it, so it took a bit more work to get it right. Also, that small amount of extra height left too little hood clearance for the QD coupler exiting the tank, so I had to reconfigure the elbow and regulator to lower it back down.

 

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Excellent info/tech/write up. :beer
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I think I'm going to install a Saginaw PS pump this week, having found one of the Chevy offset long neck reservoirs last week per the Junkyard Finds thread. That should clear the York with my mounting configuration, whereas a typical Saginaw reservoir looks like it would be covered up.

In planning what all I'll be doing at the same time (trimming up the corners on the mount a bit, finally painting the bare metal, and taking measurements to make another one to fill a member request), I realized there's an easy way to get to the tricky lower rear mounting bolt: unbolt the accessory bracket and cinch down the York's mount with it away from the engine block. It'll require a helper to support the weight, or maybe I'll go full overkill and set up the engine hoist (!), but for how infrequently something like that needs to be done, I think that beats fabbing up an extended wrench to get at it.
 

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Discussion Starter #19


Trimmed up and painted the mount. Mo' pretty.



Mount backside, super easy to tighten down the lower bolt when the accessory bracket is off the block!



Intake tube out of the way...unobstructed view of the wiring and plumbing.



Loads of clearance with the offset Saginaw reservoir.



The regular Saginaw reservoir alongside it is positioned at roughly the same mounting angle, showing how offset the '98 Chevy S-series reservoir is. You can see why I didn't think a regular Saginaw would fit. Turns out, the York could actually be mounted a couple inches lower this way, making for an easier fit below SD intake tubes in addition to MAF. The reservoir neck can be rotated away for even more room.



Quick 'n dirty measurement notes for the mounting brackets, for anyone want to make their own.

Full-size pics: https://www.supermotors.net/registry/28006/87943
 

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I love that offset PS reservoir. You mention on your SM pics that is from an S series Chevy. Any idea what year? Going to look on Rock Auto and clueless what years for S series trucks.
 
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