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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 1990 FSB w/302 (no mods) and an E4OD. This is not the original engine (see sig). The ACT sensor is sitting on the valve cover.



There is no hole to put this thing in. There looks to be a place where it "would" go but it hasn't been drilled or tapped.



I was told that on newer year trucks/bronco's, the ACT was moved to the air box. So could I get an air box from one of those years and cut/extend the wires on the sensor and put it in the air box?

Thanks
Solid.
:beer
 

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solidpvc said:
I have a 1990 FSB w/302 (no mods) and an E4OD. This is not the original engine (see sig). The ACT sensor is sitting on the valve cover.



There is no hole to put this thing in. There looks to be a place where it "would" go but it hasn't been drilled or tapped.



I was told that on newer year trucks/bronco's, the ACT was moved to the air box. So could I get an air box from one of those years and cut/extend the wires on the sensor and put it in the air box?

Thanks
Solid.
:beer
Here's what I did -

My original flat tappet 87 5.0 was replaced with a 96 hydraulic roller 5.0 engine.

The same thing was true for the 96 engine, there is not any provision in the lower intake for the ACT sensor. Not a big deal, in fact, it's BETTER that it is not in the lower intake tract, because it saves the sensor from getting gummed up with oil blowby.

What I did was extend the harness for the ACT simply by purchasing the correct gauge of wire, spliced the new wire into the harness to lengthen it. Once you have lengthened the harness, now remove the top of your stock air box and decide where you want to dril a hole to accept the ACT sensor.

I drilled mine so that the sensor once mounted will not interfere with the air filter when the top of the box is closed. I also drilled the hole so the sensor is situated between the (2) openings in the air box lid for even air flow past the sensor.

once the hole was drilled, I used some silicone on the threads of the sensor and screwed it into the lid where I drilled the hole. Then, just zip tie the excess harness to the air tube coming off the valve cover so it's not dangling nar any hot parts of the engine. If you want to get creative like me, I also wrapped my newly extended harness in black conduit so it looks completely factory...

I've not had ANY issues at all by doing the above.

Your engine is a newer engine, probably a 94, because most of the 5.0's after 1993 had the ACT hole delete in the lower intakes, as the ACT was moved to the air intake tract on many Ford 5.0 equipped vehicles.
 

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Satyr of the Midwest
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I would advise against it. The computer is the determining factor when considering where the ACT sensor should go. The EEC in your truck is 'expecting' the temperature signal to be much higher (in closed loop) than the EECs in later years with the ACT in the air filter box. The reason? The warm coolant flowing through the throttle body, the EGR influx, and the radiation from the manifold itself are all contributing to the air charge, where the sensor is supposed to be, being much warmer than the air at the air filter.

If it were mine, I'd find an NPT tap and put 'er in that runner. I'm actually going to have to do this exact same thing on the 5.0L Explorer manifold I'm installing on my Mustang.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks Cobra, do you have any pics of your setup? I would like to see that. I will probably do the same thing instead of buying an air box. Since it sitting on the valve cover, I'm guessing that it will have an effect on how it runs?

Thanks
Solid.
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Discussion Starter #5
Hey SigEpBlue, can this be done without taking the intake off? I'm not looking to take anything off, just want to get this thing mounted so it will work right.

Thanks.
Solid.
:beer
 

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Satyr of the Midwest
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I'm probably going to get yelled at for saying this :brownbag , but theoretically,you could do it with the right amount of care, the right tools, and a strong shop vac with attachments. The biggest problem is making sure that shavings don't find their way into the runner. They MUST be removed/sucked out entirely. The easiest way I can suggest is to remove the upper intake manifold, so the vacuuming part will be easier. You can pack the NPT tap with thick grease to hold on to the cuttings better, too.

Okay, now I'm thinking about the circumstances you're going to have to do this in: in the vehicle, under the hood, with a few progressively-larger drill bits, and tapping an NPT with a pipe tap and tap wrench while you're standing on top of the engine. :shocked

God, even after all my experience with tools and such, I'd be afraid to do it this way. :scratchhe If it were MY vehicle, I'd remove the lower intake just to be sure nothing went into the intake port, and do the tapping while the intake was mounted in a vise or jig. Thread-tapping ain't no game; you have to be square and true, especially in aluminum.

Let's take another look at this problem. The ACT is primarily used for timing functions and the related 'tweaking' adjustments by the EEC. Typically, higher temperatures make the EEC pull timing advance back to prevent detonation. If you just left the sensor on top of the manifold where it is, it'll likely get some heat from the surrounding air and manifold. If you live in a climate where the temperatures can be extreme, such as here in Michigan, the desert, or the mountainous regions, I'd suggest the aforementioned removal of the manifold and tapping. However, if there's little temperature variance where you live, and being the lazy-ass that I am, I'd just make sure it's functioning properly by itself, and leave it sitting there. If you ever notice spark knock, or you're one of these people that run their ignition timing right to the ragged edge, I'd again suggest getting it installed in the runner.

Hope this helps.
 

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Ex Navy Nuke
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On MAF it's in the air box, on SD it's in the intake. While I agree that in a perfect world you would want it in the lower intake since that is where the air temps are gonna be in the range of what the ecm is expecting. I definitely agree that it would be a lot easier to put it in the air box. If it's been moved to the air box successfully on a SD engine with no issues there's no arguing with real world results. Just go ahead and move it there and save yourself the headache of removing the upper and lower intake, because you sure don't want to drill and tap on the lower intake while it's installed in the engine.
 

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The Anti Yam!
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I see only 2 ways to correct this properly.

1. Buy a new lower with the correct port in it.

2. Remove Drill and tap the pass side of the upper intake near the middle of the top primary runner and install it there. You could try putting it in one of the idividual cylinder runners but you might intraduce a ristriction in the air flow.
 

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Ex Navy Nuke
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No, properly would be putting it in the driver's side of the lower intake where it belongs. But like I said if Cobrajet moved it to the airbox and hasn't had any issues with it there's nothing wrong with at least trying that. It'll be alot cheaper and quicker and if it works then yippee.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I don't think I will be drillin and tappin on the intake with it still on, it just ain't worth it. I might try to move it to the air box and see what it does. It if starts running worse, I'll put it back where I found it. Usually it sits right up against the lower intake.

Thanks for the help guys.
Solid.
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I had the same thing. I carefully drilled the hole and tapped it trying not to get to much aluminum down in there. It isn't as bad as it sounds. Keep a vacuum cleaner handy to suck out the shavings.
 

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I'm about to do the same thing, what size NPT tap is that, 3/8" right?

Also, make sure your intake valve on that cylinder (#6 cylinder I believe) is shut by removing the spark plug and bumping it over until you hear the air rushing out of the cylinder, otherwise having a vacuum may be the least of your worries ;-)
 

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It's pretty easy to drive the lower, I've done it a few times. If you going todo it make sure you get the appropiate bit for the tap. And if you do it with the intake mounted to the engine, place that cylinder for that runner on TDC. this would ensure nothing falls down pipe. And then vacuum the crap out of the hose with a skinny attachment.
 

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Satyr of the Midwest
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Protip: coat the tap in bearing grease.
 
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