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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I was having big tranny problems like rough shift and high rev so I had a shop look at the 95 bronco. They found the problem it was a transmission pigtail that had a bunch of mud and exposed wires so which fixed my rough shift for awhile and “ for awhile” I mean like 40 min so I took it from the shop and was on the road to sport the bronco off when I hit a stop sign and the bronco just turns off no sputter nothing just off so I threw a new battery , distributor with a new pickup sensor in it, new ignition coil and found out I was it getting spark from my spark plugs or my coil wire oh and I put a new black ICM 8 months before from Ford but that’s just one problem the other one is I can’t even keep the battery on to properly trouble shoot the battery dies completely in 3 cranks !! So I hope someone has any idea what direction I should go in!!??!
 

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1982 FSB 302, c6, BW1356 manual, manual hubs, manual windows, 3.00 gears, 31x10.5 Kenda A/T
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So I was having big tranny problems like rough shift and high rev so I had a shop look at the 95 bronco. They found the problem it was a transmission pigtail that had a bunch of mud and exposed wires so which fixed my rough shift for awhile and “ for awhile” I mean like 40 min so I took it from the shop and was on the road to sport the bronco off when I hit a stop sign and the bronco just turns off no sputter nothing just off so I threw a new battery , distributor with a new pickup sensor in it, new ignition coil and found out I was it getting spark from my spark plugs or my coil wire oh and I put a new black ICM 8 months before from Ford but that’s just one problem the other one is I can’t even keep the battery on to properly trouble shoot the battery dies completely in 3 cranks !! So I hope someone has any idea what direction I should go in!!??!
Does the battery get hot when it drains. That is a lot of energy to lose in about 5 seconds. Wherever it is going should be hot. Are you sure you have all of your grounds connected and clean?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Does the battery get hot when it drains. That is a lot of energy to lose in about 5 seconds. Wherever it is going should be hot. Are you sure you have all of your grounds connected and clean?
I haven’t noticed the battery getting hot when I take it off but all the ground that I’ve seen didn’t seem to be excessively dirty or crummy
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Does the battery get hot when it drains. That is a lot of energy to lose in about 5 seconds. Wherever it is going should be hot. Are you sure you have all of your grounds connected and clean?
Yes that’s why I’m concerned because I don’t know where all that power is going!
 

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Yo Ruggcowboy,
Short Circuits, Common Locations TSB 95-02-11 on 94-95 Bronco & Trucks; See O. Fuse 13 Blown
Source: by Ford

SHORT CIRCUITS
NOTE
: Never use a self-powered test light to perform checks for opens or shorts when power is applied to the circuit under test. The test light can be damaged by outside power.



  1. Isolate the circuit from power and ground.
  2. Connect the self-powered test light or ohmmeter ground clip to a good ground and probe any easy-to-reach point in the circuit.
  3. If the light comes on or there is continuity, there is a short somewhere in the circuit.
  4. To isolate the short, probe a test point at either end of the isolated circuit (the light should be on or the meter should indicate continuity).
  5. Leave the test light probe engaged and sequentially open connectors or switches, remove parts, etc. until the light goes out or continuity is broken.
  6. When the light goes out, the short is between the last two circuit components which were opened.
VOLTAGE
This test determines voltage available from the battery and should be the first step in any electrical troubleshooting procedure after visual inspection. Many electrical problems, especially on computer controlled systems, can be caused by a low state of charge in the battery. Excessive corrosion at the battery cable terminals can cause poor contact that will prevent proper charging and full battery current flow.

  1. Set the voltmeter selector switch to the 20V position.
  2. Connect the multi meter negative lead to the battery's negative (-) post or terminal and the positive lead to the battery's positive (+) post or terminal.
  3. Turn the ignition switch ON to provide a load.
  4. A well charged battery should register over 12 volts. If the meter reads below 11.5 volts, the battery power may be insufficient to operate the electrical system properly.
VOLTAGE DROP
When current flows through a load, the voltage beyond the load drops. This voltage drop is due to the resistance created by the load and also by small resistance's created by corrosion at the connectors and damaged insulation on the wires. The maximum allowable voltage drop under load is critical, especially if there is more than one load in the circuit, since all voltage drops are cumulative.

  1. Set the voltmeter selector switch to the 20 volt position.
  2. Connect the multi meter negative lead to a good ground.
  3. Operate the circuit and check the voltage prior to the first component (load).
  4. There should be little or no voltage drop in the circuit prior to the first component. If a voltage drop exists, the wire or connectors in the circuit are suspect.
  5. While operating the first component in the circuit, probe the ground side of the component with the positive meter lead and observe the voltage readings. A small voltage drop should be noticed. This voltage drop is caused by the resistance of the component.
  6. Repeat the test for each component (load) down the circuit.
  7. If a large voltage drop is noticed, the preceding component, wire or connector is suspect.
Source: by freeautomechanic.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yo Ruggcowboy,
Short Circuits, Common Locations TSB 95-02-11 on 94-95 Bronco & Trucks; See O. Fuse 13 Blown
Source: by Ford

SHORT CIRCUITS
NOTE
: Never use a self-powered test light to perform checks for opens or shorts when power is applied to the circuit under test. The test light can be damaged by outside power.



  1. Isolate the circuit from power and ground.
  2. Connect the self-powered test light or ohmmeter ground clip to a good ground and probe any easy-to-reach point in the circuit.
  3. If the light comes on or there is continuity, there is a short somewhere in the circuit.
  4. To isolate the short, probe a test point at either end of the isolated circuit (the light should be on or the meter should indicate continuity).
  5. Leave the test light probe engaged and sequentially open connectors or switches, remove parts, etc. until the light goes out or continuity is broken.
  6. When the light goes out, the short is between the last two circuit components which were opened.
VOLTAGE
This test determines voltage available from the battery and should be the first step in any electrical troubleshooting procedure after visual inspection. Many electrical problems, especially on computer controlled systems, can be caused by a low state of charge in the battery. Excessive corrosion at the battery cable terminals can cause poor contact that will prevent proper charging and full battery current flow.

  1. Set the voltmeter selector switch to the 20V position.
  2. Connect the multi meter negative lead to the battery's negative (-) post or terminal and the positive lead to the battery's positive (+) post or terminal.
  3. Turn the ignition switch ON to provide a load.
  4. A well charged battery should register over 12 volts. If the meter reads below 11.5 volts, the battery power may be insufficient to operate the electrical system properly.
VOLTAGE DROP
When current flows through a load, the voltage beyond the load drops. This voltage drop is due to the resistance created by the load and also by small resistance's created by corrosion at the connectors and damaged insulation on the wires. The maximum allowable voltage drop under load is critical, especially if there is more than one load in the circuit, since all voltage drops are cumulative.

  1. Set the voltmeter selector switch to the 20 volt position.
  2. Connect the multi meter negative lead to a good ground.
  3. Operate the circuit and check the voltage prior to the first component (load).
  4. There should be little or no voltage drop in the circuit prior to the first component. If a voltage drop exists, the wire or connectors in the circuit are suspect.
  5. While operating the first component in the circuit, probe the ground side of the component with the positive meter lead and observe the voltage readings. A small voltage drop should be noticed. This voltage drop is caused by the resistance of the component.
  6. Repeat the test for each component (load) down the circuit.
  7. If a large voltage drop is noticed, the preceding component, wire or connector is suspect.
Source: by freeautomechanic.com
ohh thank you!!
 

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I still say inertia switch since he said it shut off when he hit a stop sign. Long cranking periods with no start will kill a battery in a heart beat. Especially if they are back to back with no charging in between.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I still say inertia switch since he said it shut off when he hit a stop sign. Long cranking periods with no start will kill a battery in a heart beat. Especially if they are back to back with no charging in between.
Haha no I didn’t literally hit the stop sign I meant I was at a stop sign and it shut off !
 

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Inertia switch is defective or needs resetting
I still say inertia switch since he said it shut off when he hit a stop sign. Long cranking periods with no start will kill a battery in a heart beat. Especially if they are back to back with no charging in between.
Inertia switch kills the fuel pump not the ignition. It would't die instantly it would sputter out. Also a stop sign isn't gonna trip the inertia switch. He could mow down multiple street signs and not trip it.Our resident member kingfish jumps his truck and it doesn't trip the inertia switch.


And a proper battery in these trucks will provide way more power than 3 cranks.



If you have a drain that kills the battery that fast you're gonna see a big spark when you connect the terminals and the cables will get warm to the touch.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Inertia switch kills the fuel pump not the ignition. It would't die instantly it would sputter out. Also a stop sign isn't gonna trip the inertia switch. He could mow down multiple street signs and not trip it.Our resident member kingfish jumps his truck and it doesn't trip the inertia switch.


And a proper battery in these trucks will provide way more power than 3 cranks.



If you have a drain that kills the battery that fast you're gonna see a big spark when you connect the terminals and the cables will get warm to the touch.
Ok I’m gonna see if I feel the heat from the battery cables but when I connect them I don’t see a huge spark from what I noticed but I will keep that in mind when I work on it tomorrow! Thanks man !
 

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That battery is bad, have it load tested. Try jumping the Bronco without using the suspect battery. Also check for codes,
 
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