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I have a bad oil leak somewhere up front Passengers side. There is oil all over the passenger wheelwell, alt. I try running the truck to see where its leaking from. To no success i see no major leaks. But this is just a optical allusion. I see a fairly big puddle on the ground after letting it sit for the night, and it seems that its leaking somewhere from the front. Does anyone know what might be causing this?


Thanks in advance.
 

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First thing I would do is to wash the engine. From there, I would start looking for the oil leak.

You could be leaking from the valve cover, intake manifold or the timing cover are the first things that I would look at.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys im going to take it to the local car wash and spray er down...
My guess is that its comming from the timming cover, as the top looks really clean "valve covers, intake" . When i put this engine in "kicking myself in the ass, as i should have done rear main, pan, and timming cover before i put it in" I put my intake carb dist and other such parts on. I did clean the engine before i put it in. But I prolly should have spent more time on it. I was in a hurry to get back on the road. The other wierd thing is it doesnt leave a puddle on the ground everynight. Lastnight it barely driped at all....
 

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is over full of oil, if so if you drive it alot then it will force oil into the breather line & out the breather on the tappett cover, if you take it for short drives it probably wont get a chane to do that so much... therefore sometimes youll get a large leak & sometimes a small leak, either way you coat the side of your engine in oil then eventually onto the ground
 

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I am having the same issue. At 1st I thought it my be my power steering pump.... But after cleaning it 3 times... I narrowed it down to the front of the engine. Along the outer sides of the rocker covers they look clean.... But I am getting oil pooling up on the front of the engine by the Distrubtor and an Tempstat housing.... I changed the oil today and put about 5.5 qts....
Then ran it for a few minutes did not find it pooling up on the top part of the block...... So I went for a little drive about 30 min... by time I got back home... it was all over the front, axle transfer case skid plate,.... dripping off the smog pump and powersteering as well as off the lip of the oil pan.:banghead:banghead:banghead:banghead:banghead:banghead:banghead:whiteflag
 

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Yeah, there's no special "bronco" fix here, all cars leak stuff from the same places.... clean it up and look at it, nothing technical about that.
 

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some one please answer this I have the same exact problem and im going crazy
Check the timing cover gasket I chased mine for over a year or so. It's notorious for producing these exact symptoms and from the exact same area. Do you have a little oil on top of the timing cover itself between the water pump and it? These gaskets dissolve and are hard to track down. Everything looks clean other than a tiny drip here or there but usually when the truck is turned off for any length of time a small to large puddle appears. There are threads on this here.....search! :thumbup -Kevin-
 

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yo,
Ford has this; 1993 Bronco/Econoline/F-Series Workshop Manual

Engine Oil Leaks
When diagnosing engine oil leaks, it is important that the source and location of the leak be positively identified prior to service. There are two methods of diagnosing engine oil leaks. The following procedure has been found to be very effective and requires only a minimum of equipment.

NOTE: Prior to using this procedure, it is important to clean the cylinder block, cylinder head(s), rocker cover(s), oil pan and flywheel housing areas with a suitable solvent to remove all traces of oil.

To perform oil leak diagnosis use Rotunda Oil Leak Detector Kit 112-R0030 or equivalent, and the following procedure.
https://www.motorcraftservice.com/pubs/content/~WSPM/~MUS~LEN/19/SPM30006.HTM

Section 03-00: Engine Service, Gasoline 1993 Bronco/Econoline/F-Series Workshop Manual

DIAGNOSIS AND TESTING

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Fluorescent Oil Additive Method
Clean engine with a suitable solvent to remove all traces of oil.
Drain engine oil crankcase and refill with recommended oil, premixed with Fluorescent Oil Additive 112-R0015 or equivalent. Use 29.6ml (1 fluid ounce) of fluorescent additive. If oil is not premixed, fluorescent additive must be added to crankcase first.
Run engine for 15 minutes. Stop engine and inspect all seal and gasket areas for leaks using Rotunda Oil Leak Detector Lamp 112-R0021 (part of 112-R0030 Kit) or equivalent. A clear bright yellow or orange area will identify leak. For extremely small leaks, several hours may be required for the leak to appear.
If necessary, pressurize main oil gallery system to locate leaks due to improperly sealed, loose or cocked plugs. If flywheel bolts leak oil, look for sealer on threads.
Service all leaks as required
https://www.motorcraftservice.com/pubs/content/~WSPM/~MUS~LEN/19/SPM30007.HTM

Pressure Method
As an alternative testing procedure, the crankcase can be pressurized to locate oil leaks. The following materials are required to fabricate the tool to be used.

Air supply and air hose.
Air pressure gauge that registers pressure in increments of one psi.
Air line shutoff valve.
Appropriate fittings to attach above parts to oil fill, PCV grommet holes and rocker arm cover tube.
Appropriate plugs to seal any openings leading to crankcase.
A solution of liquid detergent and water to be applied with a suitable applicator such as a squirt bottle or brush.
Fabricate the air supply hose to include the air line shutoff valve and the appropriate adapter to permit the air to enter the engine through the rocker arm cover tube. Fabricate the air pressure gauge to a suitable adapter for installation on the engine at the oil fill opening.


Testing Procedure

CAUTION: Use extreme caution when pressurizing crankcase. Applying air pressure above specified pressure risks damage to seals, gaskets and core plugs. Under no circumstances should pressure be allowed to exceed 27 kPa (4 psi).

Open air supply valve until pressure gauge maintains 20 kPa (3 psi).
Inspect sealed and/or gasketed areas for leaks by applying Snoop Pressure Check or a solution of liquid detergent and water over areas for formation of bubbles, which indicates leakage.
https://www.motorcraftservice.com/pubs/content/~WSPM/~MUS~LEN/19/SPM30008.HTM

Testing Procedure

CAUTION: Use extreme caution when pressurizing crankcase. Applying air pressure above specified pressure risks damage to seals, gaskets and core plugs. Under no circumstances should pressure be allowed to exceed 27 kPa (4 psi).

Open air supply valve until pressure gauge maintains 20 kPa (3 psi).
Inspect sealed and/or gasketed areas for leaks by applying Snoop Pressure Check or a solution of liquid detergent and water over areas for formation of bubbles, which indicates leakage.
https://www.motorcraftservice.com/pubs/content/~WSPM/~MUS~LEN/19/SPM30008.HTM#extract_473


Possible Leakage Points
Examine the following areas for oil leakage.
Underhood
Rocker cover gaskets
Intake manifold gaskets/end seals
Cylinder head gaskets
Oil filter
Distributor O-ring
Oil level indicator (dipstick) tube connection
Oil pressure sending unit
Cup plugs and/or pipe plugs at end of oil passages

Under Engine, With Vehicle on Hoist
Oil pan gasket
Oil pan front and rear end seals
Crankshaft front seal
Crankshaft rear seal
With Transmission and Flywheel Removed

Crankshaft rear seal
Air leakage in area around a crankshaft rear oil seal does not necessarily indicate a rear seal leak. However, if no other cause can be found for oil leakage, it can be assumed that rear seal is the cause of the oil leakage.

Rear main bearing cap parting line.
Rear main bearing cap and seals.
Flywheel mounting bolt holes.
Rear cup plugs and/or pipe plugs at the end of oil passages.
Oil leaks at crimped seams in sheet metal parts and cracks in cast or stamped parts can be detected when pressurizing the crankcase.

NOTE: Light foaming equally around rocker arm cover bolts and crankshaft seals is not detrimental and no corrections are required in such cases.

https://www.motorcraftservice.com/pubs/content/~WSPM/~MUS~LEN/19/SPM30009.HTM

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Excessive Engine Oil Consumption
see;
https://www.motorcraftservice.com/pubs/content/~WSPM/~MUS~LEN/19/SPM30011.HTM
 

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Easy trick to finding leaks.
1 clean entire engine with something like simple green which I really like or cast roll super clean(a little more rougher on paint and sticker is why I like simple green better)
2 let it dry
3 puff baby powder all around the engine in areas that look like they had oil where you washed it all off.
4 drive it
5 check for the powder being washed away by the oil.

Here's a example of a tcsae leak I had, we weren't sure where it was coming from. But everything was getting soaked with ATF fluid coming from the tcase initially.



The powder will get washed away from the spot it's leaking from.
 
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