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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 94 FSB 5.0L with E4OD Trans. It has DTC 412, 538, & 632 codes set. The air bag light flashes on with three flashes followed by two flashes (I beleave is indicating code 632). Code 632 is the Overdrive Cancel Switch. Where is this switch located? And by replacing it, can I clear the 632 code?
 

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Ha Ha Ha:histerica
Three flashes, and Two flashes is Airbag code "32". Airbag circuit open. Probably a bad clock spring.
Your OD cancel switch is on the end of the gear select lever on the steering coloumn. You have to push it during the test or you will get the 632.
 

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Stop.



Don't "try replacing" any $60-100 part. Test it. If it passes, keep looking. If it fails, THEN you should replace it. Click my tan CV in my sig & look thru the Steering Column album.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Clock spring testing?

Thanks Steve for the link to your steering column album. But I could not find the test procedure for the clock spring?
 

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This is how you would go about testing the airbag circuit. I posted this on another thread recently so I'm just gonna copy and paste.

You will need to unplug the drivers airbag below the clockspring and check the clockspring/airbag assembly for continuity (ohms) with an ANALOG voltmeter. if you use a digital meter, the voltage induced by the meter could blow the airbag off in your face.
rotate the steering wheel back and forth and watch your resistance value. It SHOULD BE 1 Ohm. if it is much less than say .8 ohms you know that the problem is is in the clockspring or airbag itself. then check the airbag by itself. 1 ohm is what you want.

Another way to go about this, is to get a hold of a 1 ohm resistor, unplug your airbag harnedd from the clockspring and plug in the resistor in it's place. clear the code and wait to see if it comes back. If the code doesn't come back, you know that all of your wiring up to that point is good. now plug the clockspring back in and plug in the resistor in place of just the airbag. if the code doesn't come back, the problem part is the airbag itself, if it does come back the prolem is the clockspring. Surefire way to make sure you don't end up with extra parts.

Hope this helps
 

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But I could not find the test procedure for the clock spring?
Store the airbag FACE-UP under the truck while you work. Remove the clock spring completely, noting which 2 pins in the steering wheel connector are for the airbag AND being careful not to spin it while it's off the column. Then test from one pin to the other. Resistance should be less than 2 Ohms; preferrably close to 0. If it passes, retest it while rotating the assembly back & forth slightly. Resistance should not change at all. If you want a service disk with almost everything you'd ever want to know, read this post.
...an ANALOG voltmeter. if you use a digital meter, the voltage induced by the meter could blow the airbag off in your face.
:smilie_slap
1) You NEVER EVER UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES test an airbag, no matter what kind of meter you have.
2) A digital meter uses FAR LESS current than an analog, so it's ALWAYS preferred for delicate circuits.
3) When any connector in the airbag circuit is disconnected, it gets shorted before the circuit is even broken, so testing through an UNplugged component is useless - you're only checking the resistance of the shorting bar.
4) Your advice is REALLY bad, & borders on dangerous. :twak
It SHOULD BE 1 Ohm. if it is much less than say .8 ohms you know that the problem is is in the clockspring or airbag itself.
Where are you coming up with these numbers??? :scratchhe I know it's not from Ford...
 

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Ok, let's start from the begining.

1. I know that service information says to never test an airbag. I probably never should have said that on a forum like this, as there are going to be people on here who don't know exactly what they are dealing with, however, I can tell you as a professional, ase certified master technician, that in the real world, an airbag can be tested. WITH CARE.

2. I will definately check my info, but I am pretty certain that analog meter sa going to flow much less current that a digital.

3. I neglected to mention the shorting bar. I know very well that it needs to be removed, and simply forgot to mention it because i never think too much about it, i just do it.

4. I admit that my advice was potentially dangerous for a do it yourselfer, and I apologize. I will consider more carefully in the future the advice that I give. As far as being bad advice, not so. I have proven to be a very effective technician with exactly these methods.

5. As far as my resistance values are concerned, they are consistent with real life values on these vehicles. Your statement sounds off to me. 2 ohms on a clockspring seems awful high. 0 is what you want, and 1 ohm on the bag itself, this equals 1 ohm total, exactly what I said.

however, for future reference, that latter method that I mentioned should be used if at all possible.

Feel free to offer any more feedback
 

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1. I bet ASE wouldn't approve of you testing live airbags.
2. No. Not even close. Analogs flow on the order of 10-100x as much as digitals.
5. My number allows for meter error, insertion loss of the leads, insertion & resistance across the shorting bar, and any resistance thru BOTH clock spring traces for the airbag. AND it's 1/2 what the ADM allows before setting that code. That's why I said less than 2; close to 0.

But it's scary that you even know what the resistance thru a live airbag is. :rolleyes: I know the airbag SIMULATOR is 2 ohms - that's enough for me.
 

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Ford says under the vehicle so the bag can't go anywhere. Yeah, it'll shake the vehicle, but it won't jump 20' up (like all the ones I've popped for fun/disposal have :D). Nor will it push the roof down, break the windshield, or burn the paint. So never put it on top.
 

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yo!
DTC 632
Code 632 - OD cancel switch not changing state. During the KOER test, AFTER the initial recognition code is generated, ..... the OD switch must be turned off and then back on ...
This code is generated when the person performing the KOER test fails to deactivate and reactivate the OD cancel switch at the end of the shift lever.
It does NOT indicate a problem unless the switch WAS INDEED deactivated and reactivated and the code still came up. (Computer needs to know if the tranny is in OD or not)


BTW, Here is an old tech bulletin showing where it is and the parts
E4OD Transmission Control Indicator Lamp (TCIL) Malfunction due to a faulty O/D cancel LED Part #F58Z-7G550-A
Source: by ATC-Distribution Group Inc. atcdg.com via web.archive.org
As long as it isn't flashing, you're ok.
Years ago, I had a fuse blow due to a harness short under strg column that affected the OD Cancel Light (it blinked randomly, no Trouble Codes or tranny malfunctions though); think it was 6 or 7)
 

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Does your horn and cruise not work either? If so, clock spring. Mine's doing the same.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Sorry I stirred up so much trouble. My horn buttons & cruse controls work. This weakend I has going to try the clock spring test w/ a 1 and/or 2 ohm resister. Thanks everyone for the advise.
 

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Ford says under the vehicle so the bag can't go anywhere. Yeah, it'll shake the vehicle, but it won't jump 20' up (like all the ones I've popped for fun/disposal have :D). Nor will it push the roof down, break the windshield, or burn the paint. So never put it on top.
After hearing stories like that it really made me wanna trigger my airbag when I had it out to do the clockspring, hehe, but it's a bit too expensive for that kind of shits-n-giggles entertainment :)
 

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The JYs I go to charge $20-50 for a small airbag, so BE CAREFUL. Make sure the shorting bar is contacting the pins as soon as you unplug any bag. If not, install a jumper (paperclip, etc.) & tape it securely while you handle/transport the bag. To "dispose" of one, use wires at least 30' long, and keep them twisted TOGETHER (shorted) until the moment you're ready to pop the bag. As long as the wires are shorted, the bag can't blow - that's why there's a shorting bar inside the connectors. Another way to be safe is to install a small fuse (3-10A) across the wires. That will keep it safe until you connect the battery. Initially, all the current will flow thru the fuse, which will burn it out quickly if your battery is good. As soon as THAT happens, the bag will pop. But up to that moment, it will be safe.

Only work with a live bag at least 30' from ANYTHING & ANYONE in a well-ventilated area. Wet the ground & remove anything flammable before starting. If you plan to do something stupid like putting loose objects on top of the bag OR blowing it face-down, you need at LEAST 100' radius clear zone around it, and spectators should be even further back.

Seat belt pretensioners aren't quite as dangerous (or anywhere near as visually impressive), but they can shoot their plugs a LONG way, so be VERY aware of where the barrel is pointing at all times.
 
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