Bronco Forum - Full Size Ford Bronco Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,515 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This Tech How To will cover the basics of pad and rotor replacement on a Dana 44, I am not covering how to repack your bearings - though this would be the idea time for you to do so.

Anytime your working on your truck with a wheel off make sure you have it securely support, I'm using both the jack and an axle stand.

Pad had separated from the backing plate thus destroying the rotor.



Start by removing the key retaining screw.


Now pull out the caliper support key and caliper support spring.


Clear view of the caliper support key and caliper support spring.


Remove the caliper and support it a way that there is no tension on the brake hose, you might have suspend it with a piece of wire, as you can see the radius arm worked well for me here.


View of the defective brake pads


The resulting damage to the rotor, I would be able to turn this down but its more cost effective to replace.


Removing the hub cap screws




I suggest using a box or paper towel to help track the parts your removing.


It might be necessary to use a blunt screwdriver to help over come the o-ring seal on the hub cap. (I'm using an old screw driver)


Now the locking hub cap can be removed.


Use a pick or small screwdriver to remove the hub lock ring.




Next I remove the axleshaft snap-ring.




To give me something to pull on I reinstall a couple cap screws.


The hub body pulls right out and should do so with little effort.


Inside you can see the first of 2 lock nuts.


You will need a spanner locknut socket like this




Shown here with the locknut removed


You can see clearly the lock washer, this will come out next.


Using the same pick tool I used earlier to remove the lock washer.




Collection of parts building up.


Again using our special socket I remove the inner lock washer.


With this last nut removied the hub and rotor will slide right off




To remove the rotor the studs will need to be pressed out.




Now remove the hub from the rotor and install into the new rotor.



Reinstall in reverse.


Pictured here is the inner lock nut, it has stud that catches the lock washer, this goes on first with the stud facing out.


Once everything is back together in the hub clean the rotor with some brake clean to remove oil residue


Compress the piston in the caliper with a C clamp, slow and steady pressure



Shown here are the new brake pads, left pad goes on the back side, one on the right goes on the front.






Caliper support key reinstalled, some neversieze added to the slides


*Bearing Adjustment
-Tighten the inner lock nut to 50ft-lbs while rotating the rotor back and forth to seat the bearing.
-Back the nut off about 45-degrees
-Install the lock washer, install the outer locknut and tighten to 150ft-lbs
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,193 Posts
man stuff gets really rusty where you are!!
nice write-up though. you should mention that you axle is holding t-bird calipers and is from a 70's truck. the ttb dosen't retain the caliper the same way, i know you know this, but some may not.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,515 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
man stuff gets really rusty where you are!!
nice write-up though. you should mention that you axle is holding t-bird calipers and is from a 70's truck. the ttb dosen't retain the caliper the same way, i know you know this, but some may not.
earler TTBs do, T-bird calipers have no effect on this how to.
 

·
Dead Horse
Joined
·
5,931 Posts
nice writeup. i will be replacing my rotors next week, there warped.

and i have a ?. did you use a press, or a BFH to removed the studs? i dont have a press so i was hoping to knock them out with a peice of brass/wood and a hammer.


94 and up have floating calipers, which are retained by 2 1/2 bolts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,193 Posts
earler TTBs do, T-bird calipers have no effect on this how to.
i thought the earlier ttb had a vaulconized (sp) piece of rubber sandwiched between two pieces of metal that pounded into a diamond shaped groove, like all ford rangers, exploders, bkII's and f-150's and my old 85bronco and most other ford truck ttb's. i know that the type of caliper makes no differance (perhaps i shouldn't have mentioned that part)but the way its held on does, thats all i was saying.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,515 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
i thought the earlier ttb had a vaulconized (sp) piece of rubber sandwiched between two pieces of metal that pounded into a diamond shaped groove, like all ford rangers, exploders, bkII's and f-150's and my old 85bronco and most other ford truck ttb's. i know that the type of caliper makes no differance (perhaps i shouldn't have mentioned that part)but the way its held on does, thats all i was saying.
They used 3 styles from 1980 to 96, the first are the same as I'm showing, than pin rail slider type (which your talking about) and 2 bolt type like in 94, 95 and 96.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,515 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
nice writeup. i will be replacing my rotors next week, there warped.

and i have a ?. did you use a press, or a BFH to removed the studs? i dont have a press so i was hoping to knock them out with a peice of brass/wood and a hammer.


94 and up have floating calipers, which are retained by 2 1/2 bolts.
You can get away with a hammer, but make sure you hit it square on, fast and sharp. You want it to drive it right through on one swing to avoid distorting the stud.

And your correct about 94 and up, its the OEM setup that was on my bronco before the SAS.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,984 Posts
Very nice pics and write up Brother, the only suggestions I would add is when using a "C" clamp to compress the caliper piston I use the old pad and put it across the pistion and then use the "C" clamp to compress the piston this way it's less turning, less travel.

Also when turning the "C" clamp go slowly so as not to build up too much pressure in the MC when you take the lid off and top it off it doesn't piss all over and make a mess.

Once you do this once or twice it's not a bad job to do!

Excellent ~ :thumbup
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,515 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Very nice pics and write up Brother, the only suggestions I would add is when using a "C" clamp to compress the caliper piston I use the old pad and put it across the pistion and then use the "C" clamp to compress the piston this way it's less turning, less travel.

Also when turning the "C" clamp go slowly so as not to build up too much pressure in the MC when you take the lid off and top it off it doesn't piss all over and make a mess.

Once you do this once or twice it's not a bad job to do!

Excellent ~ :thumbup
Good tip on using the old pad, as for going slow I think I had that covered "Compress the piston in the caliper with a C clamp, slow and steady pressure" :beer
 

·
Former owner of Shadofax
Joined
·
17,025 Posts
by the look of the "bad pads" they were practically new. Hope you changed brands for this go-round.

One more suggestion, may not work real good for you Steve seeing as the roads up there just make a total mess of everything under the vehicle, but ....when I put the pads back in I observe where the metal to metal "touch points" are between pad and caliper. These should receive the goop that comes with the pads, or if none supplied, a little antiseize. What usually ends up causing brake squeaks is normally not the pad to rotor contact unless they have gotten contaminated by something, it's the metal to metal contact areas between pad and caliper, sometimes the pins (or in my case bolts).
 

·
It's BTW Not AKA!
Joined
·
5,354 Posts
Are you sure the calipers arent dragging any?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,515 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Are you sure the calipers arent dragging any?
Yes I'm sure - I have the pad that came off and if you look closely at the pads I removed and look at the one with the pad still on it - you'll notice the pad is coming off on it as well.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,515 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
by the look of the "bad pads" they were practically new. Hope you changed brands for this go-round.

One more suggestion, may not work real good for you Steve seeing as the roads up there just make a total mess of everything under the vehicle, but ....when I put the pads back in I observe where the metal to metal "touch points" are between pad and caliper. These should receive the goop that comes with the pads, or if none supplied, a little antiseize. What usually ends up causing brake squeaks is normally not the pad to rotor contact unless they have gotten contaminated by something, it's the metal to metal contact areas between pad and caliper, sometimes the pins (or in my case bolts).

Maybe 2000kms on the dam things, I did go with a different brand. I did use the antisseize, as i use it on everything, just never really covered it here in the install. You can see I used it before as well, still some on the key. Good point though, I'll add some more pics to the writeup. I was more concentrating on the hub removal as thats were folks seem to get all hung up.

I need pics of the 2 other style calipers if anyone wants to contribute. Would like a pic with it on and the bolts or clip being removed.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,984 Posts
On my 86 I have those metal pins with the rubber strips inside that squeeze together to fit in the claiper track, looks like yours has the pins with the screws to hold the caliper in place.

For me it's essential to clean and lube the pins and caliper tracks top and bottom thoroughly, including the little spot where inner pad "keeper" sits so the caliper will center itself (float) when you drive and brake much like a balanced tire, this way you reduce friction and unnecessary drag by the pads getting longer life out of them.

Bearings and races also play a part as well here and probably get ignored with the majority of brake jobs we do. JMO :banghead

:thumbup
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,515 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
On my 86 I have those metal pins with the rubber strips inside that squeeze together to fit in the claiper track, looks like yours has the pins with the screws to hold the caliper in place.

For me it's essential to clean and lube the pins and caliper tracks top and bottom thoroughly, including the little spot where inner pad "keeper" sits so the caliper will center itself (float) when you drive and brake much like a balanced tire, this way you reduce friction and unnecessary drag by the pads getting longer life out of them.

Bearings and races also play a part as well here and probably get ignored with the majority of brake jobs we do. JMO :banghead

:thumbup
Very true, I never got into the bearings this time around for all of this was replaced and rebuilt only 2000kms ago, if not for the failed pad I wouldn't had to do this. And I mean everything was new, calipers, seals, bearings, rotors - everything but the housing.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,515 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Does anyone know where there's a write up of doing a front rotor/pad replacement on an '88 Bronco?
Wouldn't be much difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I wanted to thank you bossind
This helped me out a lot, Its been around 15 years from last I worked on anything and this guide with the images made getting my 79s new brakes done supper easy. Thank you.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top