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heard grinding while driving. made it home. pulled the brake pads and saw a huge gouge in the rotor on the passenger side. i already had the pads because i knew they were low. while changing the pads i noticed the calipers looked old and also should be replaced. i threw the new pads on just to get it to my father in law's house where i could do the whole job - rotors, check the bearings and repack with grease, calipers and pads. while pushing the piston back in on the old calipers i neglected to remove the cap on the master cylinder and brake fluid shot out through the cap. i cleaned up all the fluid and replaced the pads. the brakes felt spongy, but they WORKED! i knew i was going to bleed the whole system anyway so a little sponginess didn't bother me. got it to my father in law's with the brakes still spongy but WORKING!
did the whole job - pulled apart the wheel assembly, took off the old rotors, knocked out the abs rim, knocked out the studs, mounted the studs on the new rotors, replaced the abs ring, repacked the bearings with fresh grease, replaced the seals, put the new rotors on, put on the new calipers and put the new pads back on. bled the front brakes only. everything felt as it should with good pressure on the brake pedal. as soon as i turned the key to start it up my foot dropped all the way to the floor - no brake pressure whatsoever.
i bled the brakes again. this time, all four wheels doing the back two first and starting from the furthest point away from the master cylinder. same thing - had good brake pressure and as soon i started it up, my foot dropped all the way to the floor - no brake pressure whatsoever.
i replaced the master cylinder. bench bled it first, installed it, then bled all four brakes again. the same exact thing happened... as soon as you start it up, the pedal goes straight to the floor.
i'm at a loss. she runs beautifully otherwise. i was so excited about giving her brand new brakes and now i have nothing. please help!
 

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Dumb question. Which way are the caliper bleeders facing with the calipers mounted to the truck? Up or down?
 

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you put your calipers on the wrong side. so they are upside down and you cant get the air out of them. the bleeder should be facing up
 

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if you install them upside down and on the wrong side it will look mostly right the piston will still be in the back and you can still get the line on and they will kinda work but they will never bleed.

i know this because i have done it myself :brownbag
 

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FWIW, I was taught to open the bleeder when pushing the piston back into the caliper.

While you are bleeding the brakes again, you might as well do a full brake fluid flush.
 

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Ford advises AGAINST that.Use a squeeze bulb to remove as much fluid as possible from the MC reservoir before AND after compressing the calipers; then refill with new fluid from a sealed bottle before AND after pumping up the pedal. Doing that at every brake service will remove enough of the old fluid without the risk of introducing air or contamination with a "full flush".
Is there an explanation for why to keep the bleeder closed?

What I was told was long ago, I know things change that's why I ask.
FWIW it was explained to me that the worst fluid would be in the calipers/wheelcylinders. Opening the bleeder on the caliper would flush some of that out.

When I said "full" I meant front and rear brakes thinking of long lines to the wheel cylinders. Did any Bronco come with rear disc brakes?

What contamination would you introduce with a full flush? Wouldn't all of the contaminants already be in the system?
 

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Am I misunderstanding this, you don't bleed the brakes when you do a brake job? If Ford recommends that then why have the bleed nipple?

How would applying pressure to the piston while you open the nipple introduce contaminates?

Water in the fluid causes rust and will cause pitting in the caliper and wheel cylinder bores, hence the "fluid is worse on the calipers" thought. Like I said I was told this long ago in shop class in high school a few decades ago.
 

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Am I misunderstanding this, you don't bleed the brakes when you do a brake job?
You only bleed the system when there's been a repair that required the hydraulic part to be removed and replaced. Therefore, just changing brake pads or shoes doesn't require the system to be bled.

If Ford recommends that then why have the bleed nipple?
See above ^^^
 

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What sackman said. :rolleyes:I only have 2 hands, and I've never been able to compress a caliper WHILE opening a bleed screw. If you can... :thumbup But if you open the bleed screw, THEN compress the caliper, there's a time (however brief) that contamination can move either direction past the opened bleeder's seat.How did water get to the calipers? Through the bleeder?
A block of wood, really big pliers and a wrench. The big pliers hold the wood against the piston and hold the caliper still while you open the bleeder. I've seen pictures of tool to compress the piston with a T handle that only takes one hand to turn but never used one.

I've wondered how enough water water gets in the fluid to be a problem. I know that it can absorb water, presumably through the atmosphere, but other than a non-airtight MC cap, how? The latest fluids

In shop class I saw quite a few pitted and and rusted wheel cylinders, not as many calipers. Frequently the wheel cylinders would be leaking visibly, but not always, I don't remember a leaky caliper. Our shop teacher was old school (being that long ago, I guess that means really old school), he liked to tear down and inspect and rebuild rather just replace or let it go as is.

I know more modern parts are designed to be non-serviceable, and that's for the better as they last longer and keep guy like me from making them worse by trying to service them.

So another question about brake fluid , is there a service interval for changing it or does Ford spec it for a lifetime?
 

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to do pads or rotors doesnt require touching the bleeder. basicly any general maintance doesnt require touching the bleeder. now if you had to replace a caliper that was sticking or a bad wheel cylinder, then you would need the bleeder. any time you open a bleeder you have a chance of letting air into it.

half the time the bleeders are rusted shut and trying to open them will just break them which is why you dont generally want to touch them.

if your having issues compressing a caliper to do pads, use a big c-clamp to compress it. if that dosnt cut it then the caliper is sticking and should be replaced. opening the bleeder to compress the calipers is asking for troublle
 

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Discussion Starter #16
lesson learned

i totally had the calipers on the wrong side and up side down. i put them on right, bled the brakes and everything worked great. now i'm back in business!
thanks guys!!
 
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