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I'm looking for people who are working at big time dealerships. Not little dealerships but the major ones in your city. I am very interested in starting a career working at a good dealership being a mechanic. What type of money do these people make starting out and what type of money could they work their way to. I am very interested in this and was just wondering if this is the right field for me to go into. Are diesels good to go into could I make more money doing that? Its not all about the money. Its just I want extra money to have my off roadin truck of my dreams.
 

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I've been workin on fords for eight years now. I went to technical school in Milford NE. I've been on full commission since 2002. At first you will starve and not turn hours, be prepared to get all the chit work. until you can turn good hours and your service writer won't be afraid to give you hard stuff to diag. I Try to get my hands on any thing that comes in the door. elec diag, air suspension, engine work etc. I'm also the tranny gut on my team so I can always fall back on trans work when times are slow. When I first started doing trans work there was a 50/50 shot it would make it off my rack so that sucked. Go for diesels, because in my experience the more you know the better tech you will be. I made 60k last year and the highest guy in my shop made 80K. but it depends on the shop, I've heard 100k at some other shops
 

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formerly Nascarfreak88
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a guy or 2 made 100k at our Ford dealership.... well that was about 2 years ago. These are "normal" mechanics i guess you call them, not the diesel guys. Not sure what they make, but im sure its more.

its so slow now, 50% of the people there have taken up 2nd jobs, including one of the ones who made 100k... he delivers pizza now on the side.



id say go with diesel also... all the diesels that come in are split by 3 mechanics... where as the guys who dont work on diesels share all the work with 7 other guys.
 

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Wrenching for a Livin'
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Isn't dustin a big time ford desiel mech?

I heard he just got promoted to jr. assistant manager trainiee....
 

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a guy or 2 made 100k at our Ford dealership.... well that was about 2 years ago. These are "normal" mechanics i guess you call them, not the diesel guys. Not sure what they make, but im sure its more.

its so slow now, 50% of the people there have taken up 2nd jobs, including one of the ones who made 100k... he delivers pizza now on the side.



id say go with diesel also... all the diesels that come in are split by 3 mechanics... where as the guys who dont work on diesels share all the work with 7 other guys.
i work independant shop in chicago. i am the only one to do advanced diesel work.(other guys can do filters, and little shit, but if it dont run, i fix it. i am also getting paid hourly, not book time do to my constant change of what i am workign on. in one day i can have the heads off a 7.3L to having injectors out of a D max, to reprogramming a cummins.......
diesel is nice, but it is a PITA working on some of these fake big truck engines crammed in these small chassis.
i am clearing over 85k right now, and im 23, and only been there 3 years.
 

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Thanks anymore info? This information is helping me lean more towards doing it even though that is what I was most likely going to do anyway.
I guess I would just make sure that it is something you want to be doing 20-30 years from now. I've worked at garages on/off for 8 years and I love working on things and fabricating stuff, but I don't think that I would want to do it everyday, all day, for 20 or 30 years. It gets to be a lot of wear and tear on your body, and it can become monotonous. I decided to go to school instead and keep working on things as a hobby and part time money maker.

mR
 

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I guess I would just make sure that it is something you want to be doing 20-30 years from now. I've worked at garages on/off for 8 years and I love working on things and fabricating stuff, but I don't think that I would want to do it everyday, all day, for 20 or 30 years. It gets to be a lot of wear and tear on your body, and it can become monotonous. I decided to go to school instead and keep working on things as a hobby and part time money maker.

mR
You don't have to do anything for 20 or 30 years years though. If after some time goes by you don't like doing it stop and head in another direction. I'm only 27 and I've had 2 major career changes. Almost 3.
 

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Don't go by what people are making now. That is based on their experience and ability. Working on cars and trucks for a hobby is a different world to working on them for a living. Have you been working in the business? Have you been to tech school? If not, what is it that will make the dealer hire you over the other 15 people with a tool box that want to be a mechanic? It costs money to train someone, most places want someone to hit the ground running. Even if you are a superstar, you will not get the gravy jobs at first, you will need to earn the confidence and respect of the writer. Good luck.
 

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Im getting fawked apparently! I work at a Freightliner dealership, payed hourly..But I can say Im not clearing no 80-100k. I've heard of jobs like that, but NEVER seen one. Like said above..Get ready to invest in tools and tool boxes. Its not neccessary to go buy the biggest baddest tool box you can buy. Just get whats needed to survive for a few years and then go from there. Shit can get expensive FAST and there is no sence in getting knee deep in it and deciding that it is not what you want to do.

Diesels are changing pretty rapidly right now. Detroit is coming out with the DDEC15 that is a really interesting engine. Check it out on their website.

All dealerships are pretty slow rightnow due to new emissions on diesels and the rise in fuel prices, if it aint broke dont fix it seems to be the saying. Its a come and go world and at times you may be required to get another job to keep things afloat.
 

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I don't know what going on lately but the dealer i work at is has been DEAD and from what i understand is that so are alot of other shops. Things may be different in your neck of the woods.

One thing you have to worry about is there are some shops the "feed" some of the techs the good jobs and leave the BS stuff to the guys how aren't kiss asses.

In the right place you can make good money but it may take a few years to get there especially if you on flat rate. I will say a dealer is alittle easyer because after awhile you see the same problems and already know what you need to fix it.
 

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do you have good mechanical apptitude?? if you are not very good mechanically already i would look for something else... trade schools really teach you specialty stuff and you will retain it if you have a good working knowledge already... they can't teach mechanical logic per se
 

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You don't have to do anything for 20 or 30 years years though. If after some time goes by you don't like doing it stop and head in another direction. I'm only 27 and I've had 2 major career changes. Almost 3.
Well that is nice and all, but what happens when a guy gets kids, a house payment, insurance, car payment, etc? If a person is in a career for a while, they presumably have moved up which increases their wages, which increases their standard of living. 10 years down the road, generally, it is extremely rare that a person can just go in a whole new direction in a new career field and expect to be earning the same type of wages that they were making in the field that they now have 10 years experience. That is not to say that going back to school and earning a degree cannot produce this effect. But going back to school with a family presents many of the same challenges as changing career fields half way through a person's working life.

mR
 
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