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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Heres pics from the second job I sold which was the boiler install. The original boiler was in terrible shape. The husband used to do everything himself and the boiler looked like it. It had literally been patched back together over the years. We got the new boiler installed and piped in one day the only thing left to do is go back and disassemble the old boiler so we can get it out. The new boiler was about 700 Lbs the old is about 1,000Lbs of cast iron.

This is the house and the bilko doors we had to go up and down




Heres some pics of the old boiler and the piping nightmare that we had to get rid of










And after a long day here's what we wound up with. It's not perfect but considering the time frame and the fact that we had to cut out all the old valves and redo both the supply and return manifold I'm pretty happy with it










These two jobs are only the 3 and 4th unit sales I've made in the new year and the first two I've actually gone out on to install. God this weather has been killing us. I sold over two dozen installs last year and this year so far has sucked.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
GearHead said:
you albe to exhaust outta single wall pipe?
Yes, unless you are passing through a wall then it must be double walled B-vent otherwise if it's just going from the heater to a chimey you just use standard smoke pipe. There is a piece of concrete board in the one spot where the smoke pipe is a little close to the floor joists though.
 

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kht428 said:
Yes, unless you are passing through a wall then it must be double walled B-vent otherwise if it's just going from the heater to a chimey you just use standard smoke pipe. There is a piece of concrete board in the one spot where the smoke pipe is a little close to the floor joists though.


ah, gotcha. do you use t-cell or rubatex over the copper or do you not insulate them?

i'm in the hvac wholesale biz, but in florida, we dont get into boilers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Unless it's steam or an outside room install where the system has antifreeze in it we don't insulate. With steam though you have to insulate or you have to figure all the exposed piping into your heat loss calcs. When we do insulate though we use rubatex. Especially now that they've got the split stuff with adhesive. The old rubitex adhesive is a pain it the ass to use out of the can.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hmmm a boiler explanation for southerners Take a swampcooler put it in a basement with a oil fired burner under it and hook pipes to it instead of duct work. Or take an old still and instead of moon shine run water through it(blasphemy I know) and enjoy the heat.
Sorry can't think up anymore redneck explanations than that been a long day:goodfinge :toothless
 

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Clean install man... Unfortunaly sounds like the homeowner will probably come downstairs and "fix" things after you leave to suit him.....

Couple more questions for ya---- What the efficientcy(sp) rating on these types of units?? I know the new 90% gas direct heat units I've been spec'ing out around here only require a PVC vent since there is so little heat escape. And we're having to put condinsation lines on the heat exchangers also..... Are these systems whole house type systems, Ie- radiant heat for comfort and hot water for showers ect or just comfort?? Thanks in advance---_Fog
 

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Very clean installs! My grandfather was a pipefitter for IR and would do commericial jobs. Still talks about certain big ones he did. Pretty cool.

Adrianspeeder
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Foghorn said:
Clean install man... Unfortunaly sounds like the homeowner will probably come downstairs and "fix" things after you leave to suit him.....

Couple more questions for ya---- What the efficientcy(sp) rating on these types of units?? I know the new 90% gas direct heat units I've been spec'ing out around here only require a PVC vent since there is so little heat escape. And we're having to put condinsation lines on the heat exchangers also..... Are these systems whole house type systems, Ie- radiant heat for comfort and hot water for showers ect or just comfort?? Thanks in advance---_Fog
The husband is bed ridden now he can't even get down the steps. Even if he could he's not all there anymore. Probably doesn't even know what a boiler is anymore.

As far as efficiency goes remember this is a numbers game. The boiler you see is a New Yorker FR147/173 with domestic coil(for hot water). the boiler is rated right around 86% Efficient. Now remember that Oil burns twice as hot as Natural gas so my 86% oil boiler produces more heat and quicker recovery times than a 90+% gas unit. Oil has about 147,00 Btu's of heat per gallon and will burn at 3,000 degrees(really about 2500) Gas has only 70,000 Btu's and burns around 1400 dgrees and propane is more efficient than gas and burns around 1600 - 1700 degrees. There are 90+% oil units coming out now but they are very new and I haven't been brave enough to sell them yet. I'm going to give them a couple years to work out any bugs before I put them in a customers house.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the compliments. If we could have had another day the piping would have looked nicer but since it's still cold around here and they're like 85 and 95 years old I had to get the heater in and piped in one day. Normally an install like this we would get the old boiler out and the new one down on day one. Do some preliminary piping and get a parts list together then spend all day on day 2 doing the piping. We did our best to make it look nice though. We had to get rid of the old stuff I couldnt even close most of the valves.
 

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are the copper lines just suspened in the air, or is there actually something holding/supporting them up. can't really tell form teh pics
 

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Cool thanks for the reply.... Those things are alien to me, so now I know a little about them. Take care---Fog
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Now for the not so fun part of my job. Boiler removal. Cast Iron boilers are assembled from sections. Theres a front back and however many sections in between to get the amount of heat needed for a particular application. In this case it was a seven section boiler, each section was a little over 130 lbs. The boilers are pressed together then all thread is used to keep them together. First cut the all thread then take a sledge hammer and a wedge and a big ass prybar and have at it. Below is what you end up with. One big mess.











 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
85f150 said:
are the copper lines just suspened in the air, or is there actually something holding/supporting them up. can't really tell form teh pics
The copper lines are supported a little farther away from the boiler. We had to move the pipe around alot to get everything back together so everything at the boiler is suspended by the pipe itself. That's part of the reason I used black iron pipe out of the top of the boiler, cause I knew the supply manifold would be hanging from it.
 
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