Bronco Forum - Full Size Ford Bronco Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,232 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This started on another thread that had NOTHING to do with the original thread so I had to start another one. I was looking at a rig that had a pinion brake and had a few questions. What are the advantages and disadvantages. I asked if they worked better/worse and was told they work better than conventional brakes. Can anyone explain that to me?

Also just chime in on any discussion that fits this.

Chris
 

·
RIP Spring Creek Off Road
Joined
·
6,012 Posts
they have more leverage on the system because you apply stopping pressure before the r&p... but this also has the disadvantage of trying to stop something that is moving quickly... this heats up the pinion brake very quickly
anothe disadvantage is that if you break an axle shaft, ring and pinion/locker you loose brakes for that axle... a lot of sanctioning bodies will only allow you to have one pinion brake for that reason
generally you'll only see pinion brakes on rockwell'ed rigs because they are difficult/expensive to set up four corner disc and they come with big clunky drums... heating up brakes isn't going to be much of a problem on a rock buggy normally but for the mud truck rigs it really is an issue
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
anyone got a picture of how this would be set up?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
712 Posts
I haven't even heard of a pinion brake that's actually used for stopping the vehicle, thought all those do is act as a parking brake? Also the brake will be loading the ring and pinion on the "wrong" side (coast?) - kinda like engine braking does, but much more intense...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
648 Posts
Didn't most of the early monster trucks use pinion brakes? I beleave so, that would be stopping 10,000 lbs. All the trucks I've seen on the trail with rocks and pinion brakes seemed to stop really well. I also saw a truck one time that had two pinion brakes on each rockwell, one on each side of the diff. That would probably help with the heat.
 

·
Registered
1996 Bronco 5.0/E4OD/BW1356
Joined
·
1,489 Posts
They definatly look cool - but like people have said, heat is an issue. Why not run a pinion break in addition to the drums?
 

·
RIP Spring Creek Off Road
Joined
·
6,012 Posts
on rockwells drums are heavy.... cause your truck to have to be much wider... can fill up with mud etc... the width and the weight is going to be a big thing... and heat won't be an issue on rock crawlers normally
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,232 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I was initally looking at choices for a daily driver. Since heat is even an issue, there is no way I could use one since I will be using mine like a tow rig. I will probably step over to the rear disc setup and use some of my spare t-bird parts. That way I have e-brakes too.

Chris
 

·
Retired
Joined
·
16,015 Posts
Pinion brakes are designed for emergency brakes. They are not the most reliable and not DOT approved. If you loose an axle or gears you will have no brakes. On a trail rig would I use them most likely but not on a street driven truck. That is my opinion.;)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,549 Posts
Didn't most of the early monster trucks use pinion brakes? I beleave so, that would be stopping 10,000 lbs. All the trucks I've seen on the trail with rocks and pinion brakes seemed to stop really well. I also saw a truck one time that had two pinion brakes on each rockwell, one on each side of the diff. That would probably help with the heat.
they are still using them, and if you listen to the announcers those things will eat a set of pads up in a 90 second freestyle run.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Real Hummers (not talking about the H2 mess) runs two rotors on both sides of the diff. They are not mounted on the pinion but still rely on the axles to get braking forces to the wheels, and they are DOT approved on civilian H1s.
Best brakes I've ever stopped on BTW.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
712 Posts
Oh yah, some Jags have that setup as well, also used on certain Masseratti models too IIRC. However, why two different size rotors on the Hummer?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
However, why two different size rotors on the Hummer?
:stupid Thats a cool set-up. I cant imagine that set-up last very long. Hence the short spurts of monster truck runs.. damn Thats gotta get expensive....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,702 Posts
For the street NO, for the trail yes
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,161 Posts
I was seriously considering a pinion brake setup on my '69 Bronc crawler (NP205 TC and D60 rear). However, after it was a rolling chassis, it was clear that mounting a disc on the dif pinion was not happening...it wouldn't have been possible to protect it from rock damge. The TC mounting option looked little better. So I abandoned the idea for my rig since all options appeared to me to be too vulnerable and a mashed up pinion rotor would be beeatch to deal with on the trail.

I'm running line-locks and they serve well as temp E-brakes..but of course I don't trust them like I would a mechanical setup. At some point I am going to mount the VW brake lever I scrounged up and reconnect the original e-brake stuff that is currently not installed in my D60 because I thought I was going with a pinion brake setup originally.

Edit: I didn't make it clear that I was ONLY going to have a pinion E-brake..still have service brakes on all four corners.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,109 Posts
A pinion brake on a standard (non-Rockwell styel) rear axle would be worthless on the trail. How long would it take trail debris or a big rock to take out the rotor? They work on Rockwells because they're generally out of harm's way and easy to protect.

You could mount it on the tcase end of the driveshaft, but then you have yet another link that can break and leave you without brakes.

The reason inboard brakes are DOT approved is redundancy. There is very little chance that both axles would break. One side would still work under most circumstances.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top