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I think I'm finally done with my latest PC build...


 

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Needs fish in it - or a little dude scratching in the fans like they’re turn tables


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Lol, we tried that with a little Mario figure, but it didn't work out. All of the LEDs are addressable so I don't normally leave it on that Disco setting. Right now I have the bottom flickering like embers and the rest of the lighting blue.
 

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That brings back memories... we had a really cool UPS guy growing up - we’d hide behind the bushes and as soon as we’d start throwing snowballs at the big brown truck, he’d stop, slide his door back and there would be a pile of snowballs on the floor ready for the counter offensive!
 

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Edit- I ran out of time above & left out the description...

This is the Rubio Canyon Pavilion, which was part of the Mt. Lowe railway system built in the 1890s. It was the first of a series of hotels built into our local mountains. The trolley tracks on the left would bring in passengers from Pasadena or Los Angeles. The buildings spanned Rubio Canyon, with the stream running below. The bottom building was the dining/dance hall, & its structure was part of the support for the upper building. The upper was the hotel.

This building was destroyed by a rock slide caused by an electrical storm in 1908. It was during the off-season, so the only people inside were the manager & his family. He & his wife were trapped inside. 2 daughters were able to get out & operate the next leg of the rail to go get help. One son lost his life. If I remember correctly he was the only person ever lost in the history of the railway.

My house was built a few years later & is located in what used to be downstream from this, in a place where the terrain became wide & flat. Now there is a debris basin & flood control channels above us which carry any canyon water away unnoticed. When we first moved here we thought the house was built on the site of an old dump. We would find tiny old glass bottles, square nails, & other debris working their way out of the dirt. After learning the history of the Pavilion, I wonder if some of that may have been washed down from its loss. :shrug

 

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When we first moved here we thought the house was built on the site of an old dump. We would find tiny old glass bottles, square nails, & other debris working their way out of the dirt. After learning the history of the Pavilion, I wonder if some of that may have been washed down from its loss. :shrug
I lived in a house where we would find similar things pushing out of the dirt. I know 50 years ago it was a farm. Before that, I believe it was a Native American camp. Glass and scrap iron were everywhere, even had a piece of car trim grown stuck in a tree. Once I found a tiny porcelain doll arm, less than an inch long. Had a fully formed hand and fingers. The biggest find was a group of rocks under a 100 year old tree. These rocks were all from the rocky mountains. They included a softball sized chunk of potassium feldspar, chunks of white quartz, softball sized chunks of pumice stone, and two chunks of obsidian. One was extremely layered, from a volcano that erupted very consistently. The other was worked by hand into an axe head. Weighed about 4 pounds and the curved 8" blade was razor sharp. Unfortunately I lost it all in that fire, except one pumice stone I managed to find amongst the rubble. These stones were all buried amongst the roots of the tree.

The land we are on now was definitely under water relatively recently (thousands of years) because it has a LOT of sand and smooth pebbles like those in a stream or river.
 

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Driving Stuff Henry Built
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I lived in a house where we would find similar things pushing out of the dirt. I know 50 years ago it was a farm. Before that, I believe it was a Native American camp. Glass and scrap iron were everywhere, even had a piece of car trim grown stuck in a tree. Once I found a tiny porcelain doll arm, less than an inch long. Had a fully formed hand and fingers. The biggest find was a group of rocks under a 100 year old tree. These rocks were all from the rocky mountains. They included a softball sized chunk of potassium feldspar, chunks of white quartz, softball sized chunks of pumice stone, and two chunks of obsidian. One was extremely layered, from a volcano that erupted very consistently. The other was worked by hand into an axe head. Weighed about 4 pounds and the curved 8" blade was razor sharp. Unfortunately I lost it all in that fire, except one pumice stone I managed to find amongst the rubble. These stones were all buried amongst the roots of the tree.

The land we are on now was definitely under water relatively recently (thousands of years) because it has a LOT of sand and smooth pebbles like those in a stream or river.
Sorry to hear about the loss of those stones, especially the axe head. That sounds pretty cool.

Yeah, we're clearly on old riverbed. Any digging involves sand & smooth river rock. Looking at a topo map you can see we're in the path of the original stream, but at a place where the flow widened out & slowed down. We've been told the neighborhood was part of a farm, which is where the dump area theory came in. But realizing that we're in the stream, that there was a hotel lost upstream, & the multiple odd tiny glass bottles that have been found, make me wonder. They don't seem big enough for everyday use. Maybe they could be perfume bottles, but that seems odd for a farm family. Maybe the builder liked perfume & tossed his empites about. Who knows? :shrug

The house itself is odd. It looks to have been started before ww2, but finished during or after the war. In the basement all looks normal. In the attic you can see they finished building with whatever they could get. Varied size lumber, some sistered together, & some obviously used material with paint on it. There are 5 different styles of windows used. More modern up front & downstairs, older surplus looking in back & upstairs. Different door styles. Different door knobs & rossettes. The big clue is steel wiring. Not aluminum, steel. Probably produced to save copper like the steel pennys of 1943.



Here's the next leg of the Mount Lowe railway, the "Great Incline". It was 2,590 feet long & took you from the Rubio Canyon Pavilion hotel up 1,238 feet to the top of Echo Mountain. Grade varied from 48 to 62%. It was a funicular, with 2 cars balancing each other on a heavy cable that went around a powered wheel at the top. The concept is similar to "Angel's Flight" in LA, but was built earlier & was much steeper, longer, & higher. The 3 rail design with the 4 rail passing section was developed to keep the tracks narrow where the railway had to be cut into rock. You can see the passing section near the top of this pic. Most of the upper portion of the track is out of sight in this view. The dark section of track is the "Macpherson Trestle" (pictured below).





The "Macpherson Trestle", part way up the incline. Concrete for the footings had to be carried up by men because the grade was so steep the mules refused.
 

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Water will do some insane things. Funny part about the current place, is it's kinda on a wide flat hill, with no evidence of a valley to support a stream. Though thousands of years ago, we were 1000 ft below sea level, so we have lots of marine fossils. I find mussel fossils in the limestone. In the "deeper water" out west near Hays, they have fossils of 6ft diameter clams. Then theres Mushroom Rocks, Rock City, and the brand new state park of the Little Jerusalem Badlands.

The badlands




Last place had a seasonal stream that would flood during heavy rains. All sorts of trash was carried by it since it was ditch-fed. Old bottles and cans especially. Recently found most of a 75th anniversary can of Pepsi.

Funniculars are so cool! Especially some of the really old ones. We dont have anything like that around here, because our hills arent tall or steep enough.
 

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Next built was another hotel, near the end of the incline up to Echo Mountain. It was originally called the Echo Mountain House, but was renamed the Chalet when another, larger, hotel was built close by. Elevation about 3,200 ft.

 

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A brisk summer day, atop Rollins Pass. 50° and rainy. One of my favorite places to escape.



100 years ago, a hotel sat in that very spot at 11,660ft, on a saddle on the Continental Divide. The Corona Hotel was the highest hotel in the world. It was held down to the mountain with cables anchored into solid rock, due to winds often reaching over 100mph. The anchors are still there. It's a tumultuously beautiful place that reminds you of how fragile life really is.





The hotel, in all its glory





Since it was on top of a mountain, and ran all winter long, there were sheds at the top to completely house a few trains.

An artist's rendition/colorization of a pic from 1910.

 
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