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Ex Navy Nuke
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I'm putting in a mech oil press gage but I want to clarify something before I get it. I've seen them with sending units as well as the plastic line that runs into the gage. My question is; are the ones with sending units just glorified idiot lights like the stock one in the dash? Do I need to get the one with the plastic line from the oil passage to the back of the gage for it to really be accurate? I don't have a problem running the oil line into the cab if necessary but if the sending unit gages are just as accurate then why run pressurized oil into the cab? Just wondering, now hit me all your wisdom fellas.
 

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I like the machanical guages over the electric ones. There more accurate and the electric ones can be way out of whack. For example, you can put 10 mechanical thermometers in 100 degree water and they will all say 100 degreese. If you put 10 electronic thermometers in the same 100 degree water one will say its 95*, one says 106*, one says its 92*.......................and so on.

Now if you do go with the mechanical gauge, the best thing I can tell you is to throw that plastic line in the garbage as soon as you get it. Spend the $18 on the copper line that will not split open when it gets old like the plastic does. That plastic line cost me a 7.3 diesel in my old 89 F350, so you will never see me use it on anything again
 

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I wont run fluid into the cab, period. I dont agree with the mechanical gauges being more accurate than the electric gauges, although atmittedly, I havent had 10 to compare at once. All I know is I stick with Autometer gauges and the senders on their electric gauges are very accurate. Perhaps the ones that are less accurate are the cheap ones you can buy at pep boys in the ricer section. Autometer would not tolerate such variation in pressure as these gauges do go on race cars, guys. The only reason to run a mechanical gauge is to run them in an off highway vehicle, meaning the vehicle will never see pavement. Anything else is at your own risk and possibly others.
 

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"The only reason to run a mechanical gauge is to run them in an off highway vehicle, meaning the vehicle will never see pavement. Anything else is at your own risk and possibly others."

um.....WHAT??????
 

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shibby
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RydeOn said:
I wont run fluid into the cab, period. I dont agree with the mechanical gauges being more accurate than the electric gauges, although atmittedly, I havent had 10 to compare at once. All I know is I stick with Autometer gauges and the senders on their electric gauges are very accurate. Perhaps the ones that are less accurate are the cheap ones you can buy at pep boys in the ricer section. Autometer would not tolerate such variation in pressure as these gauges do go on race cars, guys. The only reason to run a mechanical gauge is to run them in an off highway vehicle, meaning the vehicle will never see pavement. Anything else is at your own risk and possibly others.
Electric gauges can be affected by voltage swings and bad grounds. I've run all mechanical gauges in all three of my trucks for both oil pressure and water temp, never had a problem with them. Always used 1/8" copper tubing bought from a local "real" hardware store for a few bucks.
 

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i just finished running an electric oil guage and have no problems with it. i did not want to run the oil line into my cab and all the way up my a-pillar so i went with the electric, ill take a wire over a hose full of oil anyday.
 

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aka: kemicalburns
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all you electric guys are just scared :goodfinge
 

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snoracer98 said:
i just finished running an electric oil guage and have no problems with it. i did not want to run the oil line into my cab and all the way up my a-pillar so i went with the electric, ill take a wire over a hose full of oil anyday.
If running the line into your cab creeps you out that much just use stainless steel braided line(bullet proof, and will outlast the Bronco).....or the copper.

I personally use the copper line on the mech oil pres gauge I put in my Bronco a few months back, but I have seen guys use the nylon tubing, and it lasted for a VERY long time, and is still working fine with no leakage at all.

With mechanical gauges, there is VERY little chance of a error in pressure readings.....with electric there could be a failure.
 

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Yeah there a bunch of puszys.
I have mechanicals in everything and there have been no problems (except for 1 plactic line splitting open under the hood, but thats why I use copper now.)
 

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The Anti Yam!
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MikE2 said:
you can put 10 mechanical thermometers in 100 degree water and they will all say 100 degreese. If you put 10 electronic thermometers in the same 100 degree water one will say its 95*, one says 106*, one says its 92*.......................and so on.
Dustball said:
Electric gauges can be affected by voltage swings and bad grounds.
Both of these statment are absoulutly true, even of high quality AutoMeter and VDO gauges.




RydeOn said:
I dont agree with the mechanical gauges being more accurate than the electric gauges.
Weather you agree or not it is still a fact :shrug

It's like saying you dont agree with Gravity. Well Ok thats your opinion and all, but if you jump of a bridge your still gonna fall.


RydeOn said:
Autometer would not tolerate such variation in pressure as these gauges do go on race cars, guys.
The only race cars I'v ever seen in person ran mechanical gauges :shrug



RydeOn said:
The only reason to run a mechanical gauge is to run them in an off highway vehicle, meaning the vehicle will never see pavement. Anything else is at your own risk and possibly others.
Own risk and posibly others of what?

Ive never seen a copper mechanical oil gauge line burst. I did se one drip 1 single drop of oil becouse the person didnt tighten the compression fitting enugh when he first installed it, quick turn of a wrench fixed that.

I'v had a el cheapo Sun-Pro mechanical Oil pressure gauge in my Bronco since 1998, never had any problems.

I'v had a el cheapo Sun-Pro mechanical Oil pressure gauge in my Ranger since 2001, never had any problems.

I had a el cheapo Sun-Pro mechanical Oil pressure gauge in my 79 Mustang Cobra From 1995-1998, It was then transfered to a friends 1990 Mustang lx where it still is today, never had any problems.

I just put AutoMeter Mechanical gauges in my 89 Mustang GT, I dont expect to have any problems.

And finally

My 72 Chevrolet C-10 Long bed, came from the factory with a mechanical oil pressure gauge, it never had any problems at all untill 2000, when the nedle broke, but it never leacked a drop in 28 years.
 

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Practicing Infidel
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RLKBOB said:
I'm putting in a mech oil press gage but I want to clarify something before I get it. I've seen them with sending units as well as the plastic line that runs into the gage. My question is; are the ones with sending units just glorified idiot lights like the stock one in the dash? Do I need to get the one with the plastic line from the oil passage to the back of the gage for it to really be accurate? I don't have a problem running the oil line into the cab if necessary but if the sending unit gages are just as accurate then why run pressurized oil into the cab? Just wondering, now hit me all your wisdom fellas.
Do like I did Bob

and run both so you can compare for yourself;



Using $4.00 worth of adaptors you can install your new mechanical gauge AND retain your stock in dash "liar" of an oil pressure gauge.

I couldn't bring myself to crack my wallet wide enough to purchase a copper line that was worth over 3 times what my whole mechanical gauge, with kit, cost me, just to go away from plastic. So I may yet get a hot oil blast right in the crotch !

Read up about the install here;

http://www.supermotors.org/registry/vehicles/detail.php?id=4970&s=22156#content

Sixlitre
 

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Copper line is a farce. You're buying gauranteed eventual failure. Copper work hardens with vibrations. It all does it, there is no way around it. There are a LOT of vibration in a vehicle, especially a truck. Just saying. Make sure you keep an eye on it if you are running it, it's not completely idiot-proof.

Run the braided line if you actually worry about it.

Have any of you guys ever pulled the line off the back of the gauge at 60psi? It doesn't "spay" out. It's more like a fast dribble. You're not going to burn the hair off your sack if it leaks a little.

I use the nylon and smart routing. Grommets, reinforced bends (inside of a small rubber line, if the bend is somewhat sharp), zip ties, clamps, whatever it takes to route it smartly. Never had one bust/leak. I do carry a plug just in case.
And I'm also anal on checking things like that.

The only gauge I'd want electric on is fuel pressure. Fuel leaks of any size in the cab would suck.
 

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KillerRanger said:
Copper line is a farce. You're buying gauranteed eventual failure. Copper work hardens with vibrations. It all does it, there is no way around it.

Have any of you guys ever pulled the line off the back of the gauge at 60psi? It doesn't "spay" out. It's more like a fast dribble. You're not going to burn the hair off your sack if it leaks a little.

That's a relief ! Nobody want's a crotch full of smokin' hot motor oil. So I guess a wad of used gum isn't gonna block off the snapped line, when it happens, eh ?

Sixlitre
 

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Dustball said:
Electric gauges can be affected by voltage swings and bad grounds.
So what ur saying is that you need to have a quality install done and your charging system needs to be properly maintained. I completly agree. If you cant install stuff correctly and keep up on maintainence on your vehicle then it would make no sense to upgrade it in the first place. I dont know about your vehicle but in both my Fords everything is meticulously maintained, and the charge system runs rock solid @ 14.5 volts. As for my installation, I doubt anyone could do it better, but on the otherhand its not really hard to hook up these gauges the right way.
 

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RydeOn said:
Autometer would not tolerate such variation in pressure as these gauges do go on race cars, guys.
every drag car i have seen has had a mechanical oil pressure gauge (they use braided stainless alot), alot of times you will see a mechanical fuel pressure gauge mounted to the cowl. they do this so they don't have to plumb fuel into the cab, but they still use a mechanical gauge for accuracy.
 

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KillerRanger said:
Copper line is a farce. You're buying gauranteed eventual failure. Copper work hardens with vibrations. It all does it, there is no way around it. There are a LOT of vibration in a vehicle, especially a truck.
I use copper line on compressor heads that run 24 hours a day every day of the year. Thats 8760 hours a year with them vibrating like crazy. 8000 hours is also more than the average life of the engine in your truck. Theres no problems with vibration as long as you coil the copper line where its connected at. And with that copper capulary line the gauges come with its too small to have and vibration related problems anyways.
 
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