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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i have been reading about lockers and limited slips. i guess there are pros and cons to both. i was just thinking that cause it seems limited slips are better if you have a D.D. that also sees offroad use, and if you have a rig more suited for offroad then the full and manual lockers are better. there is the detroit electrac that is the best of both worlds

questions
1. how do you identify your front and rear ends, to find out what size(8.8,9 etc..) and gear ratio you have and wheather it is lsd or open diff, and how many splines your axles have.

2. what is the main downfall of the ttb. what tends to be the breaking points in offroad situations

3. is the ttb a dana 44? what size gear ratios did it come in.

4.does anybody know the lsd power split of the stock ttb dana44? also did all the dana44 ttb's come with lsd? is it the same as the dana trac loc that boncograveyard sells? i looked in the lockers thread and didnt see anything about one of the other types they sell the dana44 power loc. either way im guessing i will need a new carrier since im pretty sure the gear ratio i have up front is less than the 3.92 split.

i want to get ready to buy gears and figure out what is the better way to go when building a bronco that will be multi purpose (d.d./trail rig). i know i have a 8.8 with 3.55s from what i can tell but not sure about lsd or open diff, and im pretty sure it is a 31 spline front and rear, but not sure. i need to know if im going to need anouther carrier(what exacley is the carrier, im confused on this. do you only worry about carriers if you are buying lunchbox style differentials) for the front. im thinking about true trac front and rear with 4.56:1 gears, 4inch lift. i already have my 35"tires and wheels, not planning on doing a SAS so i was wondering if there are ways to make the ttb better.

any help will be appreciated. thanks
 

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check out the eaton Elocker. I beleive it is a LS thats a full locker when locked
 

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I have a '95 xlt w/ the 351w and my stock gearing is 3.54 front and 3.55 rear. I have a functioning lsd stock in the rear. I am also getting ready to do some work(starting with just changing fluids in both diffs). From what i have found the stub shaft is the weak point in the ttb(which is d44). The fix for this is the d50 stub shaft conversion. I have been pondering that one as well. As far as identifying what you got I believe the info is coded in your vin # and mine actually still have the tab/label on them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
check out the eaton Elocker. I beleive it is a LS thats a full locker when locked
according to the thread about lockers, i think the eaton is the open diff that turns into the fully locked, the auburn is the clutch LSD that turns full locker, and the electrac is geared LSD that turns full locker. i like the ideal of the detroit electrac in the rear and just a regular true trac up front, or maybe reverse the configuration.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have a '95 xlt w/ the 351w and my stock gearing is 3.54 front and 3.55 rear. I have a functioning lsd stock in the rear. I am also getting ready to do some work(starting with just changing fluids in both diffs). From what i have found the stub shaft is the weak point in the ttb(which is d44). The fix for this is the d50 stub shaft conversion. I have been pondering that one as well. As far as identifying what you got I believe the info is coded in your vin # and mine actually still have the tab/label on them.
i will check into that stub shaft conversion, thanks

so when you replace existing differential with a new lsd or full carrier you dont have to worry about the old carrier cause it gets replaced with the new unit? from what i understand the only type diff that you have to worry about the carrier is the lunchbox style that fits inside the existing carrier?
 

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so when you replace existing differential with a new lsd or full carrier you dont have to worry about the old carrier cause it gets replaced with the new unit? from what i understand the only type diff that you have to worry about the carrier is the lunchbox style that fits inside the existing carrier?
Um..........

For the 8.8, there is no carrier break. So any gear set can be used on the 8.8's carriers. If you're going to swap in a lunchbox locker or a mini spool, you have to have an open carrier. If you've got a LS carrier, you can only use it as a LS carrier with parts designed for it. Differentials like the full detroit, ARB, and some others completely replace the carrier, and the ring gear is bolted directly to it.

For the D44, there is a carrier break at 3.92. Meaning there is a carrier designed for gears with a ratio lower then that, and a carrier with a ratio higher then that. Then the same applies above with each size carrier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Um..........

For the 8.8, there is no carrier break. So any gear set can be used on the 8.8's carriers. If you're going to swap in a lunchbox locker or a mini spool, you have to have an open carrier. If you've got a LS carrier, you can only use it as a LS carrier with parts designed for it. Differentials like the full detroit, ARB, and some others completely replace the carrier, and the ring gear is bolted directly to it.

For the D44, there is a carrier break at 3.92. Meaning there is a carrier designed for gears with a ratio lower then that, and a carrier with a ratio higher then that. Then the same applies above with each size carrier.
thats what i thought.
 

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questions
1. how do you identify your front and rear ends, to find out what size(8.8,9 etc..) and gear ratio you have and wheather it is lsd or open diff, and how many splines your axles have.

2. what is the main downfall of the ttb. what tends to be the breaking points in offroad situations

3. is the ttb a dana 44? what size gear ratios did it come in.

4.does anybody know the lsd power split of the stock ttb dana44? also did all the dana44 ttb's come with lsd? is it the same as the dana trac loc that boncograveyard sells? i looked in the lockers thread and didnt see anything about one of the other types they sell the dana44 power loc. either way im guessing i will need a new carrier since im pretty sure the gear ratio i have up front is less than the 3.92 split.

any help will be appreciated. thanks
1) The stock axles should have a metal ID tag bolted to the center section, either on one of the bolts on the front of the TTB Dana44 and on one of the bolts on the rear cover of the Ford 8.8". The ID tag will tell you the gear ratio, whether it's open or LSD (limited slip) and the axle ring gear size or common naming. An example would be on the second or bottom row of numbers:

3L55 8.8 XXXXX

The "3" is often hidden under the bolt holding the tag. This code is a 3.55;1 gear ratio, LSD-equipped, Ford 8.8" with 31 spline axleshafts. You can also compare it to the axle code printed on the driver's door jamb safety sticker, which lists GVWR and other codes. The VIN# only gives you the engine code and some other build info, such as plant location, Bronco designation (U150), etc.

2) The main downfall of the Dana44 TTB in terms of breakage is that it's a 1/2-ton truck and not designed to run 35" tall tires. The added weight of the tire and rim put more stress on all the parts, especially the axleshafts and their u-joints. You'll learn to carry a few spare parts with you when you go wheeling, so you don't get stranded or have to call it a day after the first trail.

3) Available gear ratios include 3.08:1, 3.54:1 and the rare 4.10:1 on t he 8.8" rear-equipped Broncos. I've only seen the 4.10 axles equipped with the factory LSD.

4) The Trac-lok is very similar to the factory LSD unit. This is just my opinion based on about 30 years of offroading, but this is a rather weak LSD compared to other units. Many have failed due to worn clutches or lack of manitenance. The last one e used in a mustang lasted about 3 months of running the 1/4 mile 2x/ month, or about 20 trips down the strip. JSM84
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
1) The stock axles should have a metal ID tag bolted to the center section, either on one of the bolts on the front of the TTB Dana44 and on one of the bolts on the rear cover of the Ford 8.8". The ID tag will tell you the gear ratio, whether it's open or LSD (limited slip) and the axle ring gear size or common naming. An example would be on the second or bottom row of numbers:

3L55 8.8 XXXXX

The "3" is often hidden under the bolt holding the tag. This code is a 3.55;1 gear ratio, LSD-equipped, Ford 8.8" with 31 spline axle-shafts. You can also compare it to the axle code printed on the driver's door jamb safety sticker, which lists GVWR and other codes. The VIN# only gives you the engine code and some other build info, such as plant location, Bronco designation (U150), etc.

2) The main downfall of the Dana44 TTB in terms of breakage is that it's a 1/2-ton truck and not designed to run 35" tall tires. The added weight of the tire and rim put more stress on all the parts, especially the axleshafts and their u-joints. You'll learn to carry a few spare parts with you when you go wheeling, so you don't get stranded or have to call it a day after the first trail.

3) Available gear ratios include 3.08:1, 3.54:1 and the rare 4.10:1 on t he 8.8" rear-equipped Broncos. I've only seen the 4.10 axles equipped with the factory LSD.

4) The Trac-lok is very similar to the factory LSD unit. This is just my opinion based on about 30 years of offroading, but this is a rather weak LSD compared to other units. Many have failed due to worn clutches or lack of manitenance. The last one e used in a mustang lasted about 3 months of running the 1/4 mile 2x/ month, or about 20 trips down the strip. JSM84
thanks. i guess an h9 code on the door jam means its a 3.55:1 limited slip, im sure that is the most common. dont know about the ttb though.

has anyone seen whether or not the detroit electrac has been produced for either the 8.8 31 spline or the dana 44 31 spline?

as for the trac loc and power loc, if it gives a 50/50 split it seems like it would be a good/great option for the front. unless like you say it wont hold up. it doesn't actually say its a 50/50 split it just says delivers power equally to both wheels, so that is how i interpret it to mean.
 

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The power loc is a Good LS and IIRC just under 300 buxs. I have ran them in the front before and they provide prety good hook up and dont wear out as fast as the factory track loc.

I run the eaton/detroit True trac in the front and rear now and luv them. I would highly recomend them for a DD and wheeler. They are very street friendly but still provide good traction off road. IMO do not lock the front d44 up!! I welded mine at one time and broke tons of parts, I went back to a LS it was so bad!! I got the d44 true Trac new on ebay from a vedor for 392 shipped.

Hope this helps, Good Luck.
 

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I was referring to NORMAL on-road operation - not its maximum of off-road (slipping) torque split. AWD t-case diffs are geometrically biased to send more torque to the axle with more weight on it for better traction control. Axle diffs have no geometric bias.
 
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