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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking for another Bronco - and my search has come up with a few potential candidates, however, those select few have front plow setups attached (or it comes w/ the truck).

I've never owned a Bronco w/ a plow setup and had some questions:

What are the pros/cons to buying a Bronco that already has a plow setup installed?

What are specific areas to really examine or look at on the front end when buying a Bronco w/ a plow setup (please list all)?

Should a Bronco w/ a plow setup be passed over for one without?


For those that do use their Broncos for winter snow removal - do you just do local places (like your home lots, friends, family) or do you have contracts set up to make $$$? If the latter, what is the usual non-pro rate for doing such work?


Thanks for any/all help with the above, it's appreciated!
 

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TTB for short
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2,189 Posts
Anything with a plow you can pretty much bet on needing the front end rebuilt. Balljoints, pivot bushings, radius arm bushings, new springs (yes, when you plow springs become a wear item) and it probably will need a trans. Thats just the truck, you also need to check the hydraulics on the plow for leaks along with checking all the wiring and solenoids for excess corrosion. The plow also has a replaceable edge that you will want to check for wear.

I would not buy a truck with a plow unless all you plan to do with it is plow. They are almost always ragged out and way more rusted than a non-plowing truck.
 

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Premium 4 Lyfe - Way Back Staff
'95 XLT: 5.8, MAF, E4OD, 4.56's, 6" on 33's
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all good points to consider... and true, but I wouldn't look at it so badly. If you're talking '78/'79 w/solid axle, you might not be that bad off.
I picked up my '73 F250 w/plow setup for $4k last year. It was used hard for years, poorly maintained and helped start a kid off on a pretty successful small business in the neighboring big city.
I've done allot to it (most documented here) over the last summer, but it's been more about comfort and confidence than absolute need.
I'm charging roughly $80 an hr. to plow, discounts for elderly and disabled.
That was based on being charged $100 an hr. last season before I got my own rig.
Business is starting slow and that's a steep price, but that's what it's worth to me.
I do OCD type work and really give breaks for my own screw ups (stuck
I also only do residential work because it's a limited side gig and I'm on SSDI, so I can't go full blown... unless lightning strikes. :toothless


but I'm getting ahead... does this have an actual plow with it, or just "had" a plow and they left (what?) still connected?
many questions and not enough real info on the rig or the plow here.

IF it has a plow already setup, a solid front axle and runs solid... you could do worse. One thing I didn't check and had to fix immediately was the plows connecting frame-work.
It was covered with snow already and I missed 5 different cracks/breaks in the plow. On closer inspection... I learned my Western Plow was not only an out of date model, but almost every part came from a different yr./same model. It took a good amount of welding and replacement parts (pins, nuts/bolts, etc.) to make it solid again. In the end... it's as good as any, now.
Bronco's and other short frame Fords have an awesome turning radius that makes plowing in tight spaces significantly easier than allot of other rigs.

much to consider, if your serious enough.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well, the one I was looking at was a 96 Bronco, which had a 7.5ft Meyers plow, still attached to it. I had tried contacting the guy through his ad, however, no response (hate that). The body of the truck itself (from the pics), looks fine (no major body rot from any of the angles shown). Chassis rust? No idea. Front end component wear? No idea. Ad stated the plow works like new (and from the pics, does not appear to be very old). If the seller would respond, I'd have a better idea (and a way of being able to get directions to go look it over) so that I could post up actual facts about the truck.

I had come across another Bronco, 94, again, that had a plow setup attached - and a 91 as well.

I did note that with *some* Broncos I have seen, which have plows still attached, it appears as if the front end is really nose diving (much lower than rear). With a plow set up on these trucks, is it mandatory that the front springs should be upgraded to a stiffer sprin to avoid the "nose dive"? Or, would such a raked angle indicate severe front end wear (*and/or front frame damages)?
 

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Premium 4 Lyfe - Way Back Staff
'95 XLT: 5.8, MAF, E4OD, 4.56's, 6" on 33's
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well Cobra, your out of the sweet spot on the newer rigs. TTB suspension is known for "sagging" and needing regular re-alignment when used hard.
Plow work is definitely using that front end, hard. You'll need to take a close look at all the joints and bushings on a TTB front end for a plow rig.
The sag could be age and wear or simply the weight of the plow forcing down the front end after time.

I've got an old 80's model meyers (or a few, as I said) and it's a good, strong plow. One of the top 3 to go with anyway.
I think mines 7ft. and I like not having it much wider than the truck. Less weight and better control (imho) and I don't mind taking a few extra swipes.

Personally... I chose to avoid the TTB setups, but I see 'em running around, so they can't be totally worthless.
Sorry. Wish I had more for you but best of luck. :beer
 

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wow... just wrote a lengthy question about plows n junk and then lost it somehow... so heres shorter version:

hi guys, noob here, just got a 95 xlt 5.8, and have some questions about plows n stuff

1- how can i tell what lift it might have? allegedly 6", i noobishly guess an axle flip in back, the 15" rims are about 3" lower than the body in back, and they are about even with the body in the front... seems a lil off, i'm guessing could be worn springs (is the lift achieved with longer coils)? the front ttb looks suspiciously stock, but i know thats probably wrong...

2- would it be worth it to switch to a quad shock setup, as the upper coil seats are pretty shot? or not worth the time and money?

3- while i'm replacing the coil seats, which makes more sense, f250 or 350 coils (should i use f250 coil seats too??), or should i use some different coils with air bags? i would like to put a plow on it, and not rattle my teeth out in the chicago summer...

sorry if i hijacked the thread, mis-described anything, or took a lil advantage of this forum, just thought itd be worth shotgun blasting some questions! im gonna try to put up my pic for my sig in a second too... i totally appreciate all the meticulous write ups and time everyone put into their rig and hope to be competitive soon too!
 

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also any info regarding drop brackets for plow mounts would be great, i have access to one of the most amazing metal fab shops this side of the mississippi :))
 

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yo,
As Pepe advised..
and Snow Plow TSB 96-2-4 (SRS related) for 94-96 Bronco & F150
by Ford via Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at http://www.supermotors.net/registry/media/724188

LIGHT TRUCK: 1994-96 F-150

ISSUE: Some customers have questioned if snowplowing will lead to possible unintended deployment of the air bag supplemental restraint (SRS) in the subject vehicles. The following general information is provided to assist you when responding to these inquiries.

ACTION: Refer to the following information when responding to customer inquiries.

GENERAL INFORMATION

SRS AND PERSONAL USE SNOW REMOVAL ARE COMPATIBLE
The F-150 Regular Cab 4X4 is equipped with safety belts and a driver SRS. Ford engineers evaluated the SRS on an F-150 Regular Cab 4X4 in snow removal applications by installing representative snowplow hardware. They tested the vehicle under a variety of conditions to simulate low speed, personal use snow removal. The results of the tests indicated an appropriately equipped, F-150 Regular Cab 4X4 and its SRS are compatible with low speed, personal use snow removal.

The driver SRS is designed to deploy in moderate-to-severe frontal crashes.

The SRS is designed to activate in a frontal collision equivalent to hitting a solid barrier (such as a wall) at about 23 km/h (14 mph) or more, or roughly speaking, a full frontal perpendicular collision with a parked car or truck of similar size at 45 km/h (28 mph) or more.
Careless or high speed driving while plowing snow which results in vehicle decelerations equivalent to or greater than the air bag deployment threshold described above, would deploy the air bag.
Such careless driving also increases the risk that a driver may become involved in an accident. If this occurs, the SRS is designed to deploy and provide protection for the driver.

RECOMMENDATIONS
When using the vehicle for snow removal, never modify or defeat the "tripping mechanisms" designed into the snow removal equipment by its manufacturer. Doing so may cause damage to the vehicle and the snow removal equipment as well as possible SRS deployment.
Commercial snow removal applications should utilize F-250 HD Regular Cab 4X4, F-350 Regular Cab 4X4 or F-350 4X4 Chassis Cab vehicles which are much more appropriate for the rigors of long hours of plow operation.
As with all vehicles which contain an SRS system, Ford recommends that you always properly wear your safety belts and never tamper with, disconnect, or deactivate the SRS.

As with earlier model F-150's without SRS, Ford continues to recommend vehicle specifications for F-150 Regular Cab 4X4 vehicles suitable for snow removal which are found below:
F-150 4X4 Regular Cab* - 133" Wheelbase
84 Amp Battery
Super Engine Cool
V-8 Engine
Manual Locking Hubs
Front Suspension Package
Automatic Transmission
All Terrain Tires
NOTE: (*) F-SERIES SUPERCAB AND SHORT WHEELBASE MODELS AS WELL AS BRONCO AND ALL COMPACT TRUCKS ARE NOT RECOMMENDED FOR SNOW REMOVAL.

SNOW REMOVAL HARDWARE
Only installations shown in the appropriate Ford Truck Body Builders Layout Book have been evaluated by Ford. Different snow removal hardware may have different attachment points to the frame and may or may not affect deployment of the SRS.
 

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If and when you get a plow biz rollin', make sure you up your insurance appropriately. I did plow 5 seasons in central PA, and made good cash doing it. I kept a good mix of residential customers that called me first, and at least 3 parking lot contracts for business'. Make sure you have access to a backup truck, or I also had a handshake agreement with another guy to cover each other when equipment goes down. Never had to advertise other than magnet stickers made up with just my cell number. For those on the fly customers, have preprint release forms with you in-case you wack hidden obstacles you couldn't stake out ahead of time.

Adrianspeeder
 

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Premium 4 Lyfe - Way Back Staff
'95 XLT: 5.8, MAF, E4OD, 4.56's, 6" on 33's
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For those on the fly customers, have preprint release forms with you in-case you wack hidden obstacles you couldn't stake out ahead of time.

Adrianspeeder
nice little tid-bit of info there bud. :thumbup
 
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