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shibby
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Discussion Starter #1
Been working on trying to remove some broken exhaust studs that bolt the exhaust pipe flanges onto the manifolds. Heat and candle wax isn't working.

I'm going to try heating up the flanges then freezing the studs with compressed air to shock them. Is this a bad idea? I'm concerned about the cast manifolds possibly cracking.
 

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Is there any part of the stud still exposed? Typically, if the manifold can be heated, the stud itself, will easily turn right out, but this does require that you can put a handle on it.
Vise grips or the like usually work, or you can weld a nut to the stud, and then heat the manifold flange, and hit it with a wrench.
Be careful if you use an impact, for this will probably be the time that the bolt flys of and lands where it shouldn't.
 

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Been working on trying to remove some broken exhaust studs that bolt the exhaust pipe flanges onto the manifolds. Heat and candle wax isn't working.

I'm going to try heating up the flanges then freezing the studs with compressed air to shock them. Is this a bad idea? I'm concerned about the cast manifolds possibly cracking.
Have you tried the penetration oil and welding a nut on the expose stud trick?
 

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Kitteh Commandaar!
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I've done something similar in the same location as well. Instead of compressed air, I used cold tap water...warm would even work considering how hot the metal will be, but mine didn't crack. I had about 1" of stud/bolt sticking out and right after heating the manifold, Carefully poured water on the stud, trying to get as little on the manifold as possible. You could hear the metal twanging as I did it...attempted to turn it but didn't work on the first try. Did it again and it turned out, not easily but still turned out.

Can't count how many times I heated it and tried...but it just didn't work. It's possible to crack the manifold, but I think you'll be ok. Besides, stock manifolds are a plenty....

KC
 

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If you are going to do the hot/cold shock trick: Get a can of compressed air, the kind you use for cleaning your keyboard. Heat up the seized stud, turn the compressed air can upside down so it shoots out the SUPER COLD Liquid, aim the straw at the stud trying to avoid the manifold as much as possible, then give it a couple quick sprays... The liquid coming out will be sub 0 degrees and cause the metal to cool super fast, be quick and try to turn it out while the bolt is still frosted over.
 

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Practicing Infidel
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15,297 Posts
Been working on trying to remove some broken exhaust studs that bolt the exhaust pipe flanges onto the manifolds. Heat and candle wax isn't working.

I'm going to try heating up the flanges then freezing the studs with compressed air to shock them. Is this a bad idea? I'm concerned about the cast manifolds possibly cracking.
Dustball

you old wire ! Long time no see(hear from). Still breakin' stuff too eh ?

My mechanic buddy let me in on this stuff last year(fancy demo video to follow):popc1:;

http://www.loctitefreezeandrelease.com/

He knows I don't weld and took pity and paid me with a can of this stuff when I wouldn't take gas money for fetchin' him some parts.

This $h!t WORKS !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Try it, it's got me out of some no win situations and stunned me that it even could work....but it does and very well

Sixlitre
 

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shibby
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4,826 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
If you are going to do the hot/cold shock trick: Get a can of compressed air, the kind you use for cleaning your keyboard. Heat up the seized stud, turn the compressed air can upside down so it shoots out the SUPER COLD Liquid, aim the straw at the stud trying to avoid the manifold as much as possible, then give it a couple quick sprays... The liquid coming out will be sub 0 degrees and cause the metal to cool super fast, be quick and try to turn it out while the bolt is still frosted over.
That's what I was going to do. I bought a 3-pack of the compressed air cans. I have five broken studs to remove, all have about 3/4" of exposed shank that I can grab onto.

Thanks Sixlitre- the upside down compressed air cans should do the same thing but cheaper.
 

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Kitteh Commandaar!
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If you are going to do the hot/cold shock trick: Get a can of compressed air, the kind you use for cleaning your keyboard. Heat up the seized stud, turn the compressed air can upside down so it shoots out the SUPER COLD Liquid, aim the straw at the stud trying to avoid the manifold as much as possible, then give it a couple quick sprays... The liquid coming out will be sub 0 degrees and cause the metal to cool super fast, be quick and try to turn it out while the bolt is still frosted over.
Only forseen problem is that when you heat metal up, and cool it super fast, it can make it brittle from what I know, though I doubt it will do that in this application...just some food for thought.

KC
 

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Only forseen problem is that when you heat metal up, and cool it super fast, it can make it brittle from what I know, though I doubt it will do that in this application...just some food for thought.

KC
It's a risk, but if he's gonna try it, might as well go all out lol!.

I'd actually give the compressed air a try before heating it up just to see if it gets the job done. The idea is this type of cooling will cause the steel to contract ever so slightly on a molecular level, which can be all you need to get it free.

*disclaimer* I've been drinking so the words I've chosen may not be as fitting to a sober mind as it is to my intoxicated mind.
 

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Practicing Infidel
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That's what I was going to do. I bought a 3-pack of the compressed air cans. I have five broken studs to remove, all have about 3/4" of exposed shank that I can grab onto.

Thanks Sixlitre- the upside down compressed air cans should do the same thing but cheaper.
Compressed air is the temperature at your place, that day. This stuff is freezing cold and is worth every penny in my experience.

I'm still on my first can and it's saved my life with four or five major problems so far.

I'd have paid a lot more each time just to get them threads busted loose and it came through.

Give it a try if the compressed air don't work.

Sixlitre
 

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Try CRC Freeze-Off

Freeze Off Super Penetrant is a unique formula that immediately
drops the temperature of the area in direct contact with the spray.
The freezing effect cracks rusted surfaces, allowing Freeze-Off to
reach deeper and work more effectively than other penetrants.
 

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Compressed air is the temperature at your place, that day. This stuff is freezing cold and is worth every penny in my experience.

I'm still on my first can and it's saved my life with four or five major problems so far.

I'd have paid a lot more each time just to get them threads busted loose and it came through.

Give it a try if the compressed air don't work.

Sixlitre
By spraying it upside down, he's actually shooting the propellant out, which comes out pretty damn cold.



I usually have the best luck with left threaded drill bits. Soak it in PB Blaster and usually the left threaded bit will back out the broken bolt/stud. I usually do that when i break it off flush though, sounds like you still have something sticking out to grab on to.
 

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shibby
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Discussion Starter #13
Compressed air is the temperature at your place, that day. This stuff is freezing cold and is worth every penny in my experience.

I'm still on my first can and it's saved my life with four or five major problems so far.

I'd have paid a lot more each time just to get them threads busted loose and it came through.

Give it a try if the compressed air don't work.

Sixlitre
Turning the compressed air cans upside down lets you spray the liquid out and freezes things fast-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eVpl3aj5r6o
 

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Had to do this a million times already and not just with manifold bolts.

Take a 3/4" nut (large enough to get the wire between the bolt and nut) and weld it to the exposed bolt. Make sure you clean the broken bolt well and turn up the heat. Once you are done the whole nut should be red hot or orange. Take a 3/4 impact and spin it out or a long wrench with a rubber mallet works too. usually the heat is enough to brake it loose but sometimes you just need that extra load shock to get it going.

Ive removed bolts that are literally rust welded in with ease this way
 

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Had to do this a million times already and not just with manifold bolts.

Take a 3/4" nut (large enough to get the wire between the bolt and nut) and weld it to the exposed bolt. Make sure you clean the broken bolt well and turn up the heat. Once you are done the whole nut should be red hot or orange. Take a 3/4 impact and spin it out or a long wrench with a rubber mallet works too. usually the heat is enough to brake it loose but sometimes you just need that extra load shock to get it going.

Ive removed bolts that are literally rust welded in with ease this way
so your one of the idiots that is always using a 3/4" inpact on a tiny ass 3/8" bolts. :twak
 

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if the bolts are so rusted in and everything you have tried does not move them. If you go the welding way you will have a bitch of a time trying to drill them out.

If they won't budge I would cut the bolt flush with the manifold, drill it untill you get close to the threads. if the threads still will not come out, you can always use a heli coil, or drill & tap to a bigger stud size.
 

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Practicing Infidel
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shibby
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Discussion Starter #18
if the bolts are so rusted in and everything you have tried does not move them. If you go the welding way you will have a bitch of a time trying to drill them out.

If they won't budge I would cut the bolt flush with the manifold, drill it untill you get close to the threads. if the threads still will not come out, you can always use a heli coil, or drill & tap to a bigger stud size.
I worked on one side this afternoon. They weren't budging one bit, had to drill them out. 32 year old exhaust studs that have never been touched.

You and Justin

have taught me something I didn't know. Wonder if it's as cold as Freeze n" Release ?

Hope it works for you

Sixlitre
Used the compressed air cans- got the bolts plenty frozen but no luck.
 

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Practicing Infidel
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15,297 Posts
On one of my manifold studs (at least one)

I center punched, drilled and tapped new normal sized 7/16-UNC-14 threaded holes right through the busted off studs......not one of them budged or slipped or came loose.

It was like a frickin' weld

Sixlitre

p.s./
My local Midas shop just handed me 4 studs free and wished me good luck
 

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Freezing works when all else fails. I'd soak them with penetrating lube for a while first, then freeze them. You can also drip liquid propane, or refrigerant if you have any, right on it and it will do the same thing.
 
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