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Discussion Starter #1
Well I have the wonderful "top hat" hubs. And since I bought it I have had problems with the plastic selector switch melting. So I have replaced the wheel bearings on both sides and had the ball joints inspected (found to be in good shape). So I am down to thinking my brakes are rubbing. I do hear a grinding noise from up front. So it seems logical that my 23 year old calipers and rubber lines have seen their better days.

So my questions to you is -

How hard of a job is it to replace the calipers and rubber lines? Keep in mind I am a bit mechanically challenged! But I am gaining confidence everyday. :histerica

Is there any special tools needed for this?

Is there any tricks or advice you could give me?

What is the difference between loaded and unloaded calipers? Besides $$$$

My pads seem almost brand new so I wasn't going to replace them unless you recommend doing so.

Any help is greatly appreciated. I have gotten a few quotes for this and they are all around $350. And from my search the parts shouldn't be more than $75. So if it is possible I would really like to do them myself.
 

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It's not that hard of a job at all. Get a Haynes or chiltons manual and you'll have step by step instructions with pics.

But first jack it up and spin the tires to see if you can locate the noise. It could be brakes dragging, you may be able to grease the brake pad slides and fix it.
 

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IMHO disc brakes are one of the easiest DIY maintance you can do to your vehicle. The thing i would worry about most when replaceing the calipers and lines is stripping things, just make sure you spary everything with penatrating lubricant prior to starting. tools you will need are jack, JACK STANDS, lugnut wrench, socket strip and wrench for sockets, and a c-clamp, brake line wrenches would also be good to have for replaceing the lines but you can get away with using a box wrench if you dont have them.
 

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It's not that hard of a job at all. Get a Haynes or chiltons manual and you'll have step by step instructions with pics.

But first jack it up and spin the tires to see if you can locate the noise. It could be brakes dragging, you may be able to grease the brake pad slides and fix it.
Ditto.
I'd replace the rubber lines no matter what. My truck is 25 and when I squeezed the lines between my fingers they crumbled and started seeping fluid.
New parts can be had at rockauto.com for cheap.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ditto.
I'd replace the rubber lines no matter what. My truck is 25 and when I squeezed the lines between my fingers they crumbled and started seeping fluid.
New parts can be had at rockauto.com for cheap.
Exactly why I figured I would replace the calipers also. The truck had sat for quite some time. So I imagine things froze up. I could just lube everything up good. But if it is something I can do and only cost $75 or less I would rather just replace it all now then have problems this winter. Plus I don't want to damage my replacement hubs. They are getting harder and harder to find!
 

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IMHO disc brakes are one of the easiest DIY maintance you can do to your vehicle. The thing i would worry about most when replaceing the calipers and lines is stripping things, just make sure you spary everything with penatrating lubricant prior to starting. tools you will need are jack, JACK STANDS, lugnut wrench, socket strip and wrench for sockets, and a c-clamp, brake line wrenches would also be good to have for replaceing the lines but you can get away with using a box wrench if you dont have them.
pc of hose and a jar for bleeding
 

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Plenty of penetrating oil as has been stated. Probably the hardest part will be loosening the caliper bolts. Oil them and I like to use an impact wrench and blip it. Hand wrenches tend to put side pressure on stubborn bolts and possible breakage. Impact wrenches put pressure equally all the way around.
 

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Read up on bleeding the brakes before you even start, prolly a write up in the tech section.

Loaded calipers come with pads, unloaded...well, don't.
 

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besides the bleeding part

jack vehicle up,take the wheel off, and using a hammer and punch knock the pins out on each side of the caliper, and it should lift right out(no bolts),new caliper goes in same one, just put some grease in the valley of the pins,(i separated mine and put some in between the pieces)

the basic tools to hook the new line up

for wheel bearings, its 1 rachet nut(there is also c-clip on the end of the axle and a washer if i remember right), tighten it all the way down(it will stop by itself, just don't over do it)might have to rotate the rotor to seat the bearings, and back it off 1/8-1/4 turn, and your done, bearings adjusted,




just did this about 5 mounth ago, it was a piece of cake, (minus replacing caliper/lines)

i recommed upgrading the hubs, but if your dumb like me, rock auto sells the rotors cheap(i paid $60 plus shipping for 2 brand new ones that rock auto sells for like 90+ for 1)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the great replies all! :beer

I just placed a order with RockAuto for loaded calipers and rubber hydraulic lines. Both sides for 60 bucks shipped! Heck ya! :goodfinge

Keep the help coming!

Any difference in brake fluids?
 

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Good price! Every time I go to Rock Auto it locks my puter up. I think brake fluid has to be made to a certain standard because it is a critical safety component much like seat belts or even windshield wipers...maybe not very strict standards but... I never worried about brake fluid because I never had a brake fluid failure. In fact in 50+ years of driving I've never had a brake failure of any kind...knock on wood.
 

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Earl's Stainless braided brake lines work well and cost about the same too.
 

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Well let's start with this. The calipers do have bolts holding them on. They also have these 2 square pins that you drive out with a hammer and punch which will be necessary to do when replacing, but , not when removing. Be prepared to ruin a brake line or two when removing even if soaking them for a couple days prior with PB blaster. The lines on the front are pretty much a nightmare. To start with they have these crazy double sided clips that hold them in the body. These will have to go before you can take the line loose. The clips have to be spread far enough to get over the fittings and then slid off. Keep in mind there is no room to work or hardly get tools in. It may be easier to work from the top or depending how you are built you may want to attack it from the bottom. The rubber line on the rear is held on by a standard U clip that just has to be slid off. If you are doing the rear line as well keep in mind it is a center hose only. There are steel lines running off either side. The fittings for the steel lines are two different size flare nuts . So examine them and the new part before mounting b/c you may indeed get it on backwards.


Any difference in brake fluids?
All of it has a DOT3(dept of transportation) rating. I always get the house brand , especially when you are about to lose a quart from bleeding.

I always start out by gravity bleeding the system. I open all of the blled valves just enough to let them trickle and keep an eye on the master cylinder b/c of you let it run dry it will re introduce air into the system and then you have to start all over again. I reccomend using the 2 party bleed process which requires someone working the pedal. Start with the bleed valve farthest away from the master cylinder and them work towards it doing the front drivers side as the last one. Bleed every valve until the fluid is clear with no air and is not milky looking. Then move to the next one.
 

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Now that we are talking about brakes can enyone point me in the direction of a link to get some stock stainless steel braided brake lines and is it ok to us the one summit is sell that are for a truck that is lifted 3 to 5 inches?
 

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Now that we are talking about brakes can enyone point me in the direction of a link to get some stock stainless steel braided brake lines and is it ok to us the one summit is sell that are for a truck that is lifted 3 to 5 inches?
Someone recommended I buy the Russell F150 stainless soft lines... they were built for a medium lift and work great on my stock suspension.
 

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Also when installing your pads there is one small retainer clip that goes on each pad. It keeps the pad from moving longways when you apply the brakes. If you don't install this you will hear a clunk sound as the pad moves when you stop. Of course i learned this the hard way and had to do mine over again and install the clips.

Glayd
 

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I'm getting ready to do my front brakes this weekend, I've done it before, but it's been a long time. Thanks for posting, and thanks for all the great replys! I'm sure I'll be using this thread lot's.:thumbup
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Well let's start with this. The calipers do have bolts holding them on. They also have these 2 square pins that you drive out with a hammer and punch which will be necessary to do when replacing, but , not when removing. Be prepared to ruin a brake line or two when removing even if soaking them for a couple days prior with PB blaster. The lines on the front are pretty much a nightmare. To start with they have these crazy double sided clips that hold them in the body. These will have to go before you can take the line loose. The clips have to be spread far enough to get over the fittings and then slid off. Keep in mind there is no room to work or hardly get tools in. It may be easier to work from the top or depending how you are built you may want to attack it from the bottom. The rubber line on the rear is held on by a standard U clip that just has to be slid off. If you are doing the rear line as well keep in mind it is a center hose only. There are steel lines running off either side. The fittings for the steel lines are two different size flare nuts . So examine them and the new part before mounting b/c you may indeed get it on backwards.




All of it has a DOT3(dept of transportation) rating. I always get the house brand , especially when you are about to lose a quart from bleeding.

I always start out by gravity bleeding the system. I open all of the blled valves just enough to let them trickle and keep an eye on the master cylinder b/c of you let it run dry it will re introduce air into the system and then you have to start all over again. I reccomend using the 2 party bleed process which requires someone working the pedal. Start with the bleed valve farthest away from the master cylinder and them work towards it doing the front drivers side as the last one. Bleed every valve until the fluid is clear with no air and is not milky looking. Then move to the next one.
I plan on replacing the front rubber lines when I replace the calipers.

Any pointers on what tools or what is the best way to remove these clips?

And do the '88 calipers have bolts retaining them? I recall seeing the pins but not sure on the bolts.

Thanks for all the responses!!:beer
 

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I plan on replacing the front rubber lines when I replace the calipers.

Any pointers on what tools or what is the best way to remove these clips?

And do the '88 calipers have bolts retaining them? I recall seeing the pins but not sure on the bolts.

Thanks for all the responses!!:beer
The clips sucked... Bent needle nose pliers helped, if I remember right.
 
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