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Discussion Starter #1
So I've read a lot of threads related to this type of swap.
How do I tell if the speed sensor is in the axle? Is there a 9" I can use if it is? If I can't use the speed sensor in a 9" how do I make it work?
My 8.8 has rear abs, but I can just disconnect that and not use it.
I'd like to have disc brakes with a parking brake on the 9". How can I achieve this? Many suggest currie, but if I want to get a junk yard 9" and rebuild it, what model and year should I pull it out of? What is the stock yoke on an 8.8 and will any modifications be needed to the 9"?
BTW, I run a 1992 Bronco Custom on 35's with a 302, e40d, and 1356 transfer case
 

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So I've read a lot of threads related to this type of swap.
How do I tell if the speed sensor is in the axle? Is there a 9" I can use if it is? If I can't use the speed sensor in a 9" how do I make it work?
My 8.8 has rear abs, but I can just disconnect that and not use it.
I'd like to have disc brakes with a parking brake on the 9". How can I achieve this? Many suggest currie, but if I want to get a junk yard 9" and rebuild it, what model and year should I pull it out of?
BTW, I run a 1992 Bronco Custom on 35's with a 302, e40d, and 1356 transfer case
92+ had the vss in the 8.8, so disconnecting the rear abs sensor will leave you with no speedo.
There are a few options to getting around to swaping to 9. one would be to get a transfer case that has the vss port in it. there are also a few other things out there where they mount the sensor on the outside of the rear, which arent to prety lookin.
 

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aka: kemicalburns
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i know its about $300-400 bucks for that part alone. Why are you wanting to change? what are your goals for the bronco. im running an 8.8 out back for years now granted its open diff still but its been fine.
 

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Granted the Ford 9" axle is the best axle ever made but unless you're planning on running off road only or climbing the rocks, stick with the 8.8. Way less problems in modifying. The Ford 8.8 is way stronger than a Dana 44. You can always upgrade the 8.8 to disc brakes juts like you'd have to with a 9".
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I was looking for an axle that is stronger and more reliable than the stock 8.8 on the trail. I've read that the c-clips on the 8.8 are a huge point of weakness and drum brakes suck when full of mud. If I keep the 8.8, I could do the disk brake conversion. As far as eliminating the c-clips I could also use the eliminator below on the 8.8 with matching axles below. But can I combine the disc brake conversion AND c-clip eliminator kit and use them both on the same axle? I suppose this would solve the 8.8 weaknesses of the 8.8 on the trail right?
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/MSR-9333/All/
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/MSR-A31-87BRON/
 

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I was looking for an axle that is stronger and more reliable than the stock 8.8 on the trail. I've read that the c-clips on the 8.8 are a huge point of weakness and drum brakes suck when full of mud. If I keep the 8.8, I could do the disk brake conversion. As far as eliminating the c-clips I could also use the eliminator below on the 8.8 with matching axles below. But can I combine the disc brake conversion AND c-clip eliminator kit and use them both on the same axle? I suppose this would solve the 8.8 weaknesses of the 8.8 on the trail right?
Although the c-clip is an issue, other concerns are thin induction hardened OEM axles that can break midshaft or at the splines, axle tube flex that can break at the housing welds and a weak differential housing that can crack.

You should ensure at least 31+ spline performance alloy steel axles, some sort of axle tube bracing (or at least adding welds to the axle tubes at the center housing) and installing a quality limited slip differential.

Single piston disc brakes have much less performance than the larger surface area of drums. The benefit is less debris retention and a bit easier maintenance.
 

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FSB's Dirty Jersian
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Also be aware no ford 9" came with flanges, so if you want everything to match properly you may need to swap out either within the rear axle to a flange, or change the end of your driveshaft to run yokes and ujoints.
 

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I have a friend that had an 89 Bronco that he wheeled in California and is a hard core rock wheeler and he used his stock 8.8 with no problems at all. He did break one axle shaft on the TTB but that was it and he finally got rid of the Bronco when he twisted it so bad it split the roof behind the doors. He then bought an old Jeep CJ I think it was and put the stock Bronco axles in it. He did swap the TTB for an SA but is still running that 8.8 in the rear and he is still rock crawling. He also runs 39" tires on the Jeep. I've seen every form of destructive testing possible done on both the 9" and 8.8 and I have to say the 8.8 is a terrifc axle. The 9" is of course better but the 8.8 ain't no slouch. I know nothing about the C clip eliminators except they work by pressing a bearing retainer on the axle shaft with a very heavy press fit....just like the 9" axle.
 
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