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Hey, I bought a 96 bronco in august of 2009. The radiator was full of rust I flushed most of it out ,but ended up buying new radiator,water pump, new fail safe termostat and new fan clutch. And have flushed the coolent sytem many times using flush machines and in the back yard with the water hose. The other day i was helping a car that got stuck in sand and let my truck runing and the a/c on for mabey 15 minutes and it started to overheat (it was also about 97 degrees outside), the gauge got about 3/4 the way up and the truck started missing so i shut it off. The water was boiling and pouring out. I let it cool down and has ran great since, but i noticed the coolent was brown so i flushed it again. I must have rust in the block how do i get it out, i have flushed it again and again. An old man told me to put baking soda in the radiator cause it neurtrulizes acids and will break down rust so i am trying that any one got any ideas?
 

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hey bro welcome to FSB im local to you im in inverness i also have rust in my cooling system but no overheating. pm me and maby u can come over to my place and ill give you a hand with it.
 

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may be a major pita ,but you may be able to pull the freeze out plugs and try flushing the block.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I flushed everything out the rust isnt in the radiator it brand new, and i runing bakin soda in it and it seems to be breaking some of it up
 

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Toyota 4-cylinders have a nasty habit of doing that as well. I think an air pocket gets trapped in the block and allows rust to form. My 93 Camry just started doing this and I've just been flushing it once every few months to keep the circulating rust to a minimum.

Flushing the block isn't a cure, you have to address the source of rust to get it to stop.

Let us know how the baking soda works out, I may try that.
 

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Try flushing it with a citric acid flush. I use the Mercedes Benz powder with my diesels and it worked great in all the other cars i used it in, including my 89 351 F250, my friends 87 f150, 88 F250 and my 94 F350
 

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Pull the drancock and side enginer block plugs, and flush the block. Rust will be in a system if you don't use some type of rust preventor.

But is rust, really the cause of your overheating?

With having a new radiator, pump, and most of the other coolant system changed and or flushed, I would look more closely at what's happening.
 

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Pull the drancock and side enginer block plugs, and flush the block.
Rust will be in a system if you don't use some type of rust preventor.
x2 on the freeze plugs. :)
I'm new to this rust business, but. :)

I just bought a 390FE engine and with it sitting on a 55 gallon drum and
running the garden hose through it with only the block-plugs-out, got me
pure clean water right up until the water would just about stop flowing
then the rustiest dangged stuff I ever saw would come out. Over and
over! Finally wised up and knocked out the freeze-plugs-out and found
a rusty gelatin-ized mass on both sides that had to be dug out with my
finger etc.

"radiator stop leak" cause that?

I like to run a drill in those little 1/4" pipe block drains and tap them out
to 3/8" pipe and use a square head pipe plug and a 7/16" 8 point-socket
that's 1/2 drive and an impact-like swivel joint and a 2 foot extension.
...works for me. ;)

Oh yeah ...and lots of anti-seize!

I swear a guy could run a pond's full of water through it and never have
got that stuff out through those little block-plug-holes! LOL :)

3/8" tapered pipe = 37/64" drill bit
1/2" tapered pipe = 23/32" drill bit

You know?
...betcha that gelatin-like stuff wasn't transferring heat worth anything.

Butthead in AZ
ps- http://www.panix.com/~alvinj/file12/fe390+55.jpg
 

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I take it that your oil is fine, and that is not oil in your coolant?
 

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FYI, disconnecting the bottom radiator hose and re-filling thru the radiator neck won't backflush the cooling system, it will only drain the engine block possibily over heating the engine. You need to work off the top radiator hose for this to work.....there are flush kits available to splice in to the heater hoses etc.....google for video..

Unless the freeze plugs are leaking there's no need to pull all of them out just to get rid of the rust, be patient and just keep using plain water......stay a way from chemical flushes as they tend to be harsh on the inside of the engine block and could remove too much scale creating thin spots in the block walls adding to possible over heating..

Definately check/pull the heater core for rust otherwise it will keep circulating thru the system....you can ground the heater core by soldering a small piece of wire to it's side, run it to the sheetmetal behind the kick panel and this will stop the "galvonic process" creating/adding to this problem...the different metals in the heater core cause a very low level elec. current....

FYI, "electrolysis" is for bodily hair removal ......lol lol

Wash any re-usable heater and radiator hoses in Tide and it will remove any "rusty sludge" inside....clean the overflow tank as well....make sure ALL clamps hose are tight enough...

Use a good quality anti-freeze and with all the new parts and you should be good to go. I recommend you do a backflush once a year as preventative maintenance to extend the life of the water pump, radiator, heater core, engine block and freeze plugs...

If you feel the over heating was serious enough change the oil asap, a loss of viscosity in the motor oil is like burning oil in a frying pan, it won't lubricate and maintain internal moving parts and could cause a blown head gasket...



Good Luck ~ :thumbup
 

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AKA: Butthead
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x2 on almost everything! :)

...stay a way from chemical flushes as they tend to be harsh on the inside
of the engine block and could remove too much scale creating thin spots in
the block walls adding to possible over heating..
What? :)
So the scale was holding it together?
...or is it the other way around? ;)
There were bad spots and one or more gave-way and was blamed on
something that was done recently, related or not, is the way I see it.
YMMV?

"told you staying out late in bars was going to ruin your engine" -mom

Definately check/pull the heater core for rust otherwise it will keep circulating
thru the system....you can ground the heater core by soldering a small piece
of wire to it's side, run it to the sheetmetal behind the kick panel and this will
stop the "galv{a}nic process" creating/adding to this problem...the different
metals in the heater core cause a very low level elec. current....
Cool idea. :)
I wonder if it really works to protect it longer or makes the ruining process
go faster?

FYI, "electrolysis" is for bodily hair removal ......lol lol
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrolysis ;)
The word was already around, it's just that now (wasn't that way when I
was a kid) most people only know it for its "new" meaning. :/

Wash any re-usable heater and radiator hoses in Tide and it will remove any
"rusty sludge" inside....clean the overflow tank as well...
That works too? :)

Usually acid is used to clean up rust stains etc.
Like bathroom cleaners, thay can be both soapy and acidic.

Butthead in AZ
 

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The engine "scale" is just metal debris that comes loose over time from rusting away but can cause blockage in the water passages inside the block, create pockets of sludgey build up through out the cooling system playing havoc you know....

Those chemical flushes can strip off too much scale where the block wall is thinned out creating a hot spot....not enough block insulation so to speak...

Soldering a small piece of wire to the side of the heater core for grounding prevents the low level electrical current that happens when metal and cooper are joined, basic components of a heater core..

People tend to use the word "electrolysis" referring to this application but that's incorrect it is a "galvonic process" which actually takes place...

I suggest Tide as a cleaner because it won't harm anything BUT anything with acid in it could do more harm, think of the effects...acid BURNS, soap just breaks down grease and will dissolve with water...big difference IMO...

Good Luck ~ :thumbup
 

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The engine "scale" is just metal debris that comes loose over time from
rusting away but can cause blockage in the water passages inside the
block...
For sure. :)
Now there's a cause and effect I get behind. :)

Yeah, I guess the E word is more about having an outside electric current
added as opposed to galvanic action, which can be either way.

The radiator is grounded on the older vehicles, but seems like the core is
isolated from ground on my '90 and 91's except through the coolant itself.

Alvin in AZ
ps- Thanks for not getting defensive on me. :)
 

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No reason too Brother , it's all good as long as the information is correct and that's why we're all here to help and get it right you know....

Good Luck ~ :thumbup
 

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Discussion Starter #18
thanks, everyone the baking somda seems to be working, i have notied the water is brown again and flushed it and it seems to be stay clean. And iam goin to pull the heater core out a clean it. but the oil is fine it barly got hot acording to the gauge. iam goin to fush it out some more than run straight collant
 

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my old auto shop teacher swore by using cascade dish washer soap in it. it doesnt foam up like regular soap and it cleans very well.
 
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