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I have good rubber weather stripping on the back of my 1979 bronco where the tailgate meets the body and around the glass. I have the tailgate aligned. But still it seems to let some air around it while driving. What do you guys do to better seal up the tailgate and glass. I installed some stick on weather stripping on the tail gate where it meets the rubber weather stripping
 

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82 XLT Lariat 351w, Edelbrock 1406 4bbl ,C6 auto, auto locking hubs ,33x10.5x15
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I got the replacement upper run rear window gasket from lmc and no leaking here.
 

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I agree with Bmom- check all your seals around the T gate for sealness. Is that a word? You may choose to ride in the back to listen for the wind noise. On the cheap, use a long funnel, pointy end near the glass, wide end near your ear to hear the sound and listen everywhere. Use blue masking tape to mark where you hear the most noise. Then try your weather strip, etc. Remember- these old trucks are not modern vehicles and they make lots of noise. Hope this helps.
 

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Thanks I have installed dynomat in the rear it helps with the noise. I sometimes get a very slight exhaust smell while driving. I have the pipes turned out behind the rear tires. I did find that the bottom of my tailgate was bent in where it hits the rubber seal. I straightened it and that made it fit tighter along the bottom.
 

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Yup. I've used Hushmat in the doors and roof and stuffed the A pillars with fiberglass but still get a ton of wind noise over the roof. Plus I have mud terrain tires. Its just not a modern vehicle. All we can do is all we can do. 🤣
 

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From experience with the 'other' pop top SUV's in my past - adding sound deadening material to the top itself (roof) underneath the headliner makes a HUGE difference.
 

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Yo 79broncoowner,
Also inspect drain holes at bottom of tailgate.

Following by Steve:"

One of several signs that the t/g weatherbelts are ruined is rain coming out of the access panel and soaking the rear carpet. This can be difficult to notice if the ('94-96 only) t/g carpet is installed, but the trails are visible here. They appear because the factory painted paper water shedder is installed in the easy (WRONG) location, and it deteriorates rapidly.

Other signs of weatherbelt failure include:
  • defrost grid abrasions, sometimes causing the glass to shatter when the defroster is activated
  • glass abrasions
  • loose glass
  • noise when glass is moving
  • tailgate rust

The factory drip shield is just painted paper with duct tape along the bottom (which has never made sense to me), and it's almost useless. I'm surprised this one is in such good condition. It's taped along the bottom (the t/g is upside-down), and has a tacky adhesive along the top and across the middle. But since the rain leaks in along the top where the weatherbelt meets the glass, and then drips off the bottom edge of the glass, it falls on the paper and then runs in between the paper the t/g. The tape is supposed to create a seal & a dam that holds the rain in its pocket, forcing it to flow back into the t/g, but over the years, the rain works its way down past the tape. Then it flows down between the t/g & the access panel, out onto the t/g threshold seal. When that fills, it overflows the threshold and runs over to the carpet, where it seeps in and continues forward (assuming the truck is parked flat) under the rear seat, and down onto the front floor where it soaks into THAT carpet. Eventually, it makes its way to the front door thresholds where it corrodes the wiring.


This is a factory water shedder. It's taped along the bottom (the t/g is upside-down), and has a tacky adhesive along the top and across the middle. But since the rain leaks in along the top where the weatherbelt meets the glass, and then drips off the bottom edge of the glass, it falls on the paper and then runs in between the paper the t/g. The tape is supposed to create a seal & a dam that holds the rain in its pocket, forcing it to flow back into the t/g, but over the years, the rain works its way down past the tape. Then it flows down between the t/g & the access panel, out onto the t/g threshold seal. When that fills, it overflows the threshold and runs over to the carpet, where it seeps in and continues forward (assuming the truck is parked flat) under the rear seat, and down onto the front floor where it soaks into THAT carpet. Eventually, it makes its way to the front door thresholds where it corrodes the wiring.

The inner face of the water shedder is painted black so it doesn't absorb water QUITE as fast as if it was bare.

I've never understood why Ford didn't use a plastic shedder here, like on the front doors; OR why it was installed so that the water still comes inside the t/g.


This can be done with the tailgate open or closed. After removing the inside access panel, remove the vapor barrier. This one had 2, but it was obviously accidental.


This scrap of common plastic drop sheet should last much longer than the factory paper water shedder, and perform much better installed inside the t/g where it will keep the water inside so it goes out the t/g drains.

Being very careful not to wrinkle the plastic, I applied a few strips of Gorilla tape along the top edge, folded the bottom over so it would fit through the access hole, and fed it straight into the t/g along the glass.



This was the REALLY tricky part: lifting the tape and sticking it to the t/g inner reinforcement bar, without wrinkling the plastic. But this location will cause any water dripping off the bottom of the raised glass to fall on the glass side of the plastic. Then it will run down the plastic past the access opening and out the bottom of the t/g thru its original drain holes, onto the ground where it belongs.

I'm sticking the tape to the "inner top reinforcement" in this photo:

That will keep it from interfering with any of the operating rods, or fouling into the regulator.


After the tape is secure along the top, the plastic sheet is unfolded and tucked so it SHOULD stay between the glass and the operating rods. The driver's side has to stay clear of the defrost wiring (if installed).

The tape is stuck to the "inner top reinforcement" in this photo:


I don't expect it to be very difficult to push the plastic out of the way for t/g service, but time will tell. If it has to come out, it's cheap, and quick to replace."
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Mine does not have a head liner in the topper. I have sound deading material above the headliner above the front seat. I like the plastic idea in the tailgate also
 

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Mine does not have a head liner in the topper. I have sound deading material above the headliner above the front seat. I like the plastic idea in the tailgate also
i used some 1/2 thick dense camelhair / carpet underlay type material cut to fit between the ribs on the center portion of the top them covered it in black carpet
it made a huge diffeence in noise and the sound did not bounce off the top as much, and it made a huge difference in keeping truck cool in summer and my kids top of heads from freezing in the winter
 
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