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Man of endless projects
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9,167 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
jsut gotta say. absolutly love my HEI dizzy in my 88s 351. looks badass as hell, cleaned up a tone of wiring and easy as hell to install. problem is im not sure how im gonna seal it up so water wont get in when mudding deep. i still am gonna wanna have it serviceable when needed and have a vent. anyone have ideas?
 

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Wrenching for a Livin'
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6,950 Posts
Should have a seal below the distributor cap.

Our distributors get wet, because they are at the front on the engine. Its almost a fact of life.
The foxbody mustangs had a fancy rubber boot.

Or just convert to EDIS :thumbup
 

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Man of endless projects
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9,167 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Still wouldn't drive a chevy
random? its a BKO that i converted to a HEI dizzy primarrily for easy of install, nah having wires everywhere to worry obut, and cause i needed one anyways. being a dedicated mudder with a snorkel, im going to seal it one way of another and i want it a more permenent than a bag over is but not where i can service it. WD-40 wont help much if i stall over hood deep. problem is that the vent is a big notch where the wire for the coil comes out of the side of the dizzy and it makes it very easy for water to get in but sealling it off will eliminate the vent.

being that i jsut spent 100$ on a dam carb plunum to adapt to my snorkel, i dont want my dizzy being its limit. just wanted to know if anyone had ideas but i guess ill jsut use light silicone over everything , enough to seal it but not too much that i can pull it appart in the future. then ill drill a small hole for the vent
 

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Chillin on the Gulf Coast
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1,592 Posts
My MSD cap just has a little breather style cap similar to the old style ones on valve covers. If I were trying to seal mine I would drill that out and install a hose barb and run a hose to the central area that I am running all of my breathers. I am going to get one of those fancy breather sets eventually and put the water resistant type filter thingys on top of them. I am also planning to do something similar with the breather on my E4OD.
 

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Well, you could always seal the cap with just plain old silicone from a tube that can be picked up at any hardware store. It would stay flexible, be water-proof and wouldn't be hard to remove the cap. Just my .02
 

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Super Moderator
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25,366 Posts

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Super Moderator
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25,366 Posts
yo king,
The boot helps protect the coil & plug wires on top. and you can seal and insall vent hose up thru clutch blank and into cab with small engine filter
So, why ask?, seal it with a venthose...lol
 

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Super Moderator
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25,366 Posts
yo,
btw, for posterity, here is an article by Dean B at can4x4.com - I retreived from www heaven via the archives a few yrs ago; it won't help turning the Bronco into a SSN 21 Class, but...
Waterproofing Article; "...Waterproofing your vehicle is essential to maintain long term reliability. It may also give you the confidence to tackle deep water crossings without fear of engine failure. To waterproof your vehicle requires attention to the engine intake/electrical, and the drivetrain (axles, transmission and transfercase). If you have or are contemplating driving in water deeper than 30 cm. (12 inches), the following modifications are a necessity. Axles are the first parts in the driveline to be submerged upon entering deep water or mud. Axles are easier to modify than the transmission or transfercase, due to easier access to the vent tubes located on the housings. All differentials, transmissions and transfercases need a vent due to the changes in temperature created by the gear oil. Factory vent fittings are located on the surface of the housing or casing and consist of a small threaded fitting with a metal capped vent. Remove the vent & fitting and replace with threaded male fitting for a hose. You will also need two hose clamps and a filter with a male fitting. Route the breather away from moving parts and exhaust and incorporate enough length into the tube to compensate for suspension stretch. Note: extra length is not needed for transmission and transfercase, as they don't move. Place the breathers high in the rear of the engine compartment or in the corners of the body or if possible into the cab. It's possible to join transmission and transfercase breathers with a "T" fitting and use only one breather (refer to shop manual if you are having difficulty finding vent tubes). Make sure you place breather vents higher than anticipated water depth. It is vital that your engine air intake avoids water. Remember, water will not compress like gas. If submerged, the engine may suck water into the cylinders, which almost certainly will bend internal components such as piston connecting rods, destroying the engine. This is also known as 'hydraulicking' your motor. If you ever feel than your engine may have gone too deep, turn it off immediately. It's better to be safe than sorry. A few seconds is all it takes to suck water in through the carburetor or fuel injection once submerged. Going through water too fast will also splash water upwards inside the engine compartment, so keep your speed down while submerged. If you suspect water has entered the engine, pull it out to a safe place. Remove all the spark plugs and turn the motor over until all the water is ejected out through the plug holes, then reinsert spark plugs and restart. Remember also water can be sucked up the exhaust pipes, especially with headers and free flowing exhaust. If you turn off the motor while submerged, without the exhaust pressure the steel of your exhaust super cools, pulling the water up into the engine through the exhaust ports. Never stop in the middle for a "photo shoot" and turn off the motor, or you may have an unpleasant surprise. Some vehicles (particularly newer ones) have the air intake facing forward in the grill. This is the worst location. When entering deep water from or even shallow water from a steep angle, the grill area dives in first and becomes engulfed in water due to a bow wake or just from the angle of entry. By the time your rear wheels enter and your vehicle levels out, it is too late. Keep the inlet away from splashing water or submerging. Face the inlet backwards inside the engine compartment - the air is somewhat hotter, but there's much less chance of water getting in there. The distributor can also become wet. If it does, simply remove the cap and spray WD-40 inside, which will disperse the water and evaporate quickly. Re-attach the cap and start. The fan spraying water around the engine compartment may cause a wet distributor. With older vehicles, one option to prevent this is to disconnect the fan belt before starting a deep-water crossing. Unfortunately newer vehicles use serpentine style belts, which once removed will also eliminate your power steering and alternator. Another choice is to remove the mechanical fan before you leave home and install an electric fan instead. Then just before crossing any deep water, you can just switch it off or remove the fuse to turn off the fan. Flex fans should usually be avoided because if it contacts water, it can bend towards the radiator and damage both the rad and your day. Remember, always check water depth before entering. When crossing water (particularly rivers), avoid soft grassy areas, do not spin your tires, and enter and exit at the shortest crossing. Always drive slowly to reduce the bow wake created by your vehicle. When the crossing is complete, it is a good idea to ride the brakes slightly to help dry them off so they work properly afterwards..."
==============
add da EEC, alternator, all connectors, relays, grounds and most sensors and actuators to the List. Some move EEC into cab in overhead console, but the alt ,,, and all the other electrical devices and conns...will eventually be contaminated and corrode; worse will be trying to find the conductor corroded inside of the insulation &/or terminal of the connector.

===============

Waterproofing the EEC Discussion
Source: by members at FSB
 

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Registered
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80 Posts
yo,
btw, for posterity, here is an article by Dean B at can4x4.com - I retreived from www heaven via the archives a few yrs ago; it won't help turning the Bronco into a SSN 21 Class, but...

Waterproofing Article; "...Waterproofing your vehicle is essential to maintain long term reliability. It may also give you the confidence to tackle deep water crossings without fear of engine failure. To waterproof your vehicle requires attention to the engine intake/electrical, and the drivetrain (axles, transmission and transfercase). If you have or are contemplating driving in water deeper than 30 cm. (12 inches), the following modifications are a necessity.

Axles are the first parts in the driveline to be submerged upon entering deep water or mud. Axles are easier to modify than the transmission or transfercase, due to easier access to the vent tubes located on the housings. All differentials, transmissions and transfercases need a vent due to the changes in temperature created by the gear oil. Factory vent fittings are located on the surface of the housing or casing and consist of a small threaded fitting with a metal capped vent. Remove the vent & fitting and replace with threaded male fitting for a hose. You will also need two hose clamps and a filter with a male fitting. Route the breather away from moving parts and exhaust and incorporate enough length into the tube to compensate for suspension stretch. Note: extra length is not needed for transmission and transfercase, as they don't move. Place the breathers high in the rear of the engine compartment or in the corners of the body or if possible into the cab.

It's possible to join transmission and transfercase breathers with a "T" fitting and use only one breather (refer to shop manual if you are having difficulty finding vent tubes). Make sure you place breather vents higher than anticipated water depth. It is vital that your engine air intake avoids water. Remember, water will not compress like gas.

If submerged, the engine may suck water into the cylinders, which almost certainly will bend internal components such as piston connecting rods, destroying the engine. This is also known as 'hydraulicing' your motor. If you ever feel than your engine may have gone too deep, turn it off immediately. It's better to be safe than sorry. A few seconds is all it takes to suck water in through the carburetor or fuel injection once submerged. Going through water too fast will also splash water upwards inside the engine compartment, so keep your speed down while submerged. If you suspect water has entered the engine, pull it out to a safe place. Remove all the spark plugs and turn the motor over until all the water is ejected out through the plug holes, then reinsert spark plugs and restart.

Remember also water can be sucked up the exhaust pipes, especially with headers and free flowing exhaust. If you turn off the motor while submerged, without the exhaust pressure the steel of your exhaust super cools, pulling the water up into the engine through the exhaust ports. Never stop in the middle for a "photo shoot" and turn off the motor, or you may have an unpleasant surprise. Some vehicles (particularly newer ones) have the air intake facing forward in the grill. This is the worst location. When entering deep water from or even shallow water from a steep angle, the grill area dives in first and becomes engulfed in water due to a bow wake or just from the angle of entry. By the time your rear wheels enter and your vehicle levels out, it is too late. Keep the inlet away from splashing water or submerging. Face the inlet backwards inside the engine compartment - the air is somewhat hotter, but there's much less chance of water getting in there.

The distributor can also become wet. If it does, simply remove the cap and spray WD-40 inside, which will disperse the water and evaporate quickly. Re-attach the cap and start. The fan spraying water around the engine compartment may cause a wet distributor.

With older vehicles, one option to prevent this is to disconnect the fan belt before starting a deep-water crossing. Unfortunately newer vehicles use serpentine style belts, which once removed will also eliminate your power steering and alternator. Another choice is to remove the mechanical fan before you leave home and install an electric fan instead. Then just before crossing any deep water, you can just switch it off or remove the fuse to turn off the fan. Flex fans should usually be avoided because if it contacts water, it can bend towards the radiator and damage both the rad and your day.

Remember, always check water depth before entering. When crossing water (particularly rivers), avoid soft grassy areas, do not spin your tires, and enter and exit at the shortest crossing. Always drive slowly to reduce the bow wake created by your vehicle. When the crossing is complete, it is a good idea to ride the brakes slightly to help dry them off so they work properly afterwards..."
==============
add da EEC, alternator, all connectors, relays, grounds and most sensors and actuators to the List. Some move EEC into cab in overhead console, but the alt ,,, and all the other electrical devices and conns...will eventually be contaminated and corrode; worse will be trying to find the conductor corroded inside of the insulation &/or terminal of the connector.

===============

Waterproofing the EEC Discussion
Source: by members at FSB

great info, but it really needed to be broken up... there has also been discussion of waterproofing under the "overlanding bronco" thread.

and my vote goes for rtv everywhere, and a nipple/hose for a vent.
 

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Man of endless projects
Joined
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9,167 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
ya i covered all those topics long ago. ive been using my truck as a sub for awhile but not that i got a new motor thats carbed, its a bit more complicated. but the HIE dizzy doesnt have a dedicated vent and jsut uses slots n it for a vent that y i have this thread. but i will jsut use some rtv or somehting so seal it, drill a hole for a vent and be good. jsut need a way to seal the carb and keep it functional
 

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Screw the Jeep Thing
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4,522 Posts
I've been in water over my hood on my bronco. And the engine bay has always been perfectly dry, exept for a few splash spots. It always amazed me, that I could go through such deep stuff and be dry. Yet my freinds where always soaked under the hood.. Just lucky I guess.
 
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