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Discussion Starter #1
Ran the key on engine OFF test, using a jumper wire and reading the CEL. I received the codes 51 (DE 10 ATTEMPT TO GENERATE CODE 61 ) the ECT signal is greater than self-test max of 4.6 volts and 33 (DN 40 VERIFY VACUUM IS PRESENT AT THE EGR VAVLE). So first question is the order in which the codes are given should be the order you try to fix them, severity of issues (i.e. biggest problem shown first).
Second question why/how did I get a code 33 on the key on engine OFF when that code is suppose to be for key on engine ON?

Working on the CODE 33 now so far I have replaced the EGR valve, coffee can reservoir and all vacuum lines with new silicone. Going to start over again with the trouble shooting steps from the pub.
 

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Yo First,
The ECT problem should be taken care of first.

DTC 51 Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) sensor signal is/was too high -
This code is usually because the test was run with a cold engine, and the computer is expecting to see the sensor reading an already warmed engine.
The engine temperature must be greater than 50° F for the Key On Engine Off (KOEO) Self-Test and greater than 180° F for the Key On Engine Running (KOER) Self-Test.
Run it around to heat the engine up and shift thru all gears incl Reverse. Then turn off all accessories/lights, etc.

Make sure A/C is off and transmission is in Park (automatic) or in Neutral for a Manual & release clutch.

Do Key On Engine Off (KOEO) portion first.

DTC 51 ECT sensor signal is greater than the Self-Test maximum of 4.6 volts
Open circuit in harness
Sensor signal short to power
Damaged PCM - let's not get into this, yet
Improper harness connection
Damaged sensor
Remove the ECT sensor, If you see some rust in it clean it by sanding the surface using a fine grit sandpaper, Also check the connector and wiring. Reinstall and check for codes, if some are present change the unit.
Possible bad ECT sensor, or wiring. Possible missing signal ground –
See test @ Fuel Injection Technical Library » Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor (ECT) by Ryan M
R
emove egr valve, attach vacuum line, suck on the open end, look at the bottom of the egr valve to make sure the pintle moves and hold vacuum on the line to make sure it doesnt leak down and close. thats pretty much all you need to do there. You can clean the insides up with brake kleen to get all the gunk out of it. It will make it move alot easier."


151118

EVR, TAD, TAB pic by Seattle FSB

DTC 33 is triggered when the EVP sensor is not closing;
Testing & Operation; "...The EGR Valve Position (EVP) sensor monitors the position of the EGR valve pintle. The EVP sensor converts the mechanical movement of the pintle into an electrical voltage signal which is relayed to the PCM. The EVP sensor is a linear potentiometer in which resistance varies with the EGR valve pintle movement.
Voltage is fed to the EVP by the signal return circuit. As the EGR is opened the EVP directs more voltage to the EEC and less down the voltage reference circuit. The EVP sensor provides the PCM with information on EGR flow and EGR system failures. The EVP should read between 0.24 and 0.67 volts at idle with a closed EGR valve..."
EVP Test @
EGR Valve Position (EVP) Sensor Testing & Replacement by SeattleFSB
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Miesk5,

Thanks for the info, followed the steps on the EGR Valve link, the resistance test on the EVP and SIG RTN showed Ohms of 500 when it should have been 100,000 per the link. But when I went through tech manual test step D4 Check EVP Signal for short to ground say the resistance should be greater than 10,000? Also with step DN2 Check VREF to SGN RTN voltage it says it should be 4-6 volts, I got 0 Volts. But the EGR link has you check the voltage of VREF and EVP should be between 4-6 and I got 4.76V. Does anyone have any thoughts on this? I want to make sure I diagnosed the correct issue before I buy another part.

If it is the EVP I am guess no signal was getting back to EECC saying the EVP is doing its job so in turn the computer thought the EGR valve was not working.

Also does anyone know why I got code 33 with key on engine off, when the tech manual showed this code as a key on engine on code?

Next up the ECT.

(QUICK UPDATE FOR SOME REASON WHEN I BACK PROBED THE SIG RETURN TERMINAL IT DID NOT GET A GOOD CONNECTION, HENCE THE 0 VOLTS. SO WHEN I WENT IN THROUGH THE FRONT I GOT A GOOD CONNECTION AND GOT 5 VOLTS)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
So for the ECT is followed the tech pub trouble shooting and put a jumper wire with the ECT harness to generate a 61 code which it did. The pub says replace ECT, I bought a new ECT and just out of curiosity I did a resistance test between the 2 probes on the ECT that connect to the wire harness which was about 42.5, with the one installed (bad one) I could not get a reading.

So question, the new ECT had a resistance of 42.5 and per the pub you should get that reading when the temp is between 50-68 degs. Doing some more math the resistance for 42.5 is about 63 degs which is close to the ambient air temperature. Does ambient air temperature affect the part and am I getting a correct reading?

Also still trying to find out why I got a code 33 that is an key on engine RUNNING code during a key on engine OFF test?
 

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Yo
33 is also shown in Continuous Memory in addition to KOER.

TSB 92-24-03 by Ford
Publication Date: NOVEMBER 18, 1992
This TSB article is being republished in its entirety to include the Taurus and Sable models.
ISSUE: Occasionally, there are reports of the Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL) "Check Engine" or "Service Engine Soon" lamp being lit with no Self-Test codes in Continuous Memory. An explanation of three digit EEC IV Self-Test Codes has been developed along with reasons for the MIL lamp being lit with no accompanying Continuous Memory Self-Test codes.
ACTION: Refer to the following explanation of three digit EEC IV Self Test Codes to determine why the MIL lamp is sometimes lit with no accompanying Continuous Memory Self-Test codes.

MIL LAMP ACTIVATION
Following is a list of reasons why a technician may see the MIL lamp lit with no accompanying Continuous Memory Self-Test codes.
1) Technician Not Familiar With Self-Test Code Output
There are two types of EEC Self-Tests, Key On Engine Off (KOEO) and Key On Engine Running (KOER). While both of these will test for various "hard faults" that are present when the test is run, the processor continuously monitors various operating parameters whenever the engine is running. If the processor detects a problem, it will store a "Continuous Memory" code and light the MIL. These Continuous Memory codes are put out during KOEO Self-Test after any codes associated with hard faults are output.
Self-Test Codes are displayed by flashing the MIL. They are also output as voltage pulses on the Self-Test Output (STO) circuit in the Self-Test connector. In either Self-Test mode, all codes are output twice and in KOEO, the hard fault codes are separated from the Continuous Memory codes by a "separator" pulse.
A technician that is unfamiliar with the EEC Self-Test can mistakenly believe that continuous Memory codes are not present when they really are. He may run KOER Self-Test and get a pass code (111) and not realize that KOEO Self-Test must be run to receive any Continuous Memory codes. He may run KOEO Self-Test while counting MIL flashes and misinterpret the repeated hard fault pass code (111) to mean that Continuous Memory does not contain any codes.
2) Inadvertent Erasure Of Continuous Memory Self-Test Codes
Continuous Memory Self-Test codes are erased by ungrounding STI before KOEO Self-Test is complete and all KOEO and Continuous Memory codes have been displayed. It is possible to inadvertently erase Continuous Memory codes by ungrounding STI without realizing that KOEO Self-Test is not complete or the processor has not finished displaying all the codes.
The EEC Self-Test codes are not only used by service technicians, they are used as a final system test in the assembly plants. To make this test as efficient as possible, Self-Test codes are output as a very fast, short pulse width signal before the codes are displayed by the flashing MIL. These "FAST" codes can only be interpreted by end-of-line equipment or code-reading testers like Ford's Self-Test Automatic Readout (STAR) testers.
The EEC IV processor puts out both 2-digit and 3-digit Self-Test codes in both formats, "FAST" pulse width mode and "SLOW" pulse width mode. While all "STAR" type testers display 2-digit codes, the original STAR tester cannot display 3-digit service codes. If the STAR tester is used on 3-digit service code applications, the display will be blank but the tester will beep. The beeps can be counted to determine service codes. The SUPER STAR II tester will only display 3-digit service codes in "FAST" code mode. If slow code mode is used on 3-digit service code applications, the display will be blank but the tester will beep. The beeps can be counted to determine service codes. For more information on running Self-Test, refer to the "EEC IV Quick Test Procedures and Appendix" section of the Powertrain Control/Emissions Diagnosis Service Manual.
Since certain STAR testers are capable of reading and displaying fast codes before the slow codes are finished being output on the MIL, a technician can assume that since he sees codes displayed, he can unground STI and move on. If he ungrounds STI before all slow codes are output, Continuous Memory will be erased and could put out a pass code (11/111) the next time KOEO Self-Test is run. The technician may also realize that his tester is in "SLOW" mode after he has initiated the KOEO test and stop the test to change tester settings. Another possibility is that another person, a vehicle owner or another technician, could have erased the codes before the technician reporting the situation has run Self-Test. In any of these situations, the vehicle must be driven until the Continuous Memory codes are reset.
3) The Concern That Set The Continuous Memory Code Is No Longer Present
The EEC processor will erase a Continuous Memory code if the concern that caused it has not been present for 40 or 80 warm-up cycles, depending on the vehicle. A warm-up cycle occurs when the vehicle is started with the coolant temperature below 120° F (49° C) and then shutdown with the coolant temperature above 150° F (66° C). If a vehicle is brought in for service with a MIL complaint and the vehicle is driven or otherwise allowed to warm-up before Self-Test is run, the code may be cleared before the technician tests it.
4) Grounded STO/MIL Circuit
The processor controls the MIL by grounding the STO/MIL circuit (Pin 17). If this circuit shorts to ground, whether the processor is controlling it or not, the MIL will be lit. Starting in 1991, if the processor has lit the MIL, it will hold it on for a minimum of 10 seconds. If the MIL flashes quickly, the concern is probably the STO/MIL circuit shorting intermittently to ground.
5) Engine Running In HLOS
The EEC processor will enter Hardware Limited Operation Strategy (HLOS) if it detects a problem that could cause further damage to the system. Under HLOS, the processor modifies its operating strategy so that certain functions are disabled but the vehicle can be safely driven in for service. If the vehicle is in HLOS, Continuous Memory codes will not be set and Self-Test cannot be initiated. However, Continuous codes that were set before the processor entered HLOS will be retained.
6) Misinterpretation Of MIL Bulb Check
The MIL will light as a bulb check if the key is on and the engine is not running. If the engine is running and stalls or stops for any reason with the key on, the MIL will be lit and no Continuous Memory codes will be set. When the key is first turned on, the MIL will stay lit briefly after the engine is started as part of the bulb check feature.
7) MIL Flashes During Self-Test
The circuit that controls the MIL is also the Self-Test Output (STO) circuit that goes to the Self-Test connector. The MIL will flash during Self-Test as the STO circuit is cycled on and off. This is normal and no Continuous codes are set.
8) Processor KAM Is Erased Or Fails
The Keep Alive Memory (KAM) within the processor must always have voltage supplied to it. This voltage is supplied by the Keep Alive Power (KAPWR) circuit (Pin 1) that connects directly to the battery. KAM contains adaptive parameter tables that allow the processor to adapt to different operating requirements. It also contains the Continuous Memory codes. Continuous Memory codes will be erased any time KAPWR is disconnected (i.e. battery disconnected, processor disconnected, breakout box installed, open in the wire, etc.). If KAM fails within the processor, all Continuous codes will also be erased.
9) Damaged STAR Tester
A damaged STAR tester can produce erroneous code output or accidentally erase Continuous Memory.
10) KOEO Processor RAM Test Failed
The processor's Random Access Memory (RAM) is tested during KOEO Self-Test. If the processor's RAM has failed, the MIL will light and no codes are output.
11) Intermittent VSS Fault Detected In Wiggle Mode
If in wiggle mode (STI grounded) and an intermittent Vehicle Speed Sensor (VSS) fault is detected, the MIL can be lit momentarily. If the VSS signal returns to normal, the associated code is erased. In normal operation, the VSS will not light the MIL.
12) IDM Pulsewidth Not Recognized By Processor (EDIS Vehicles)
EDIS vehicles can have the MIL on with no Continuous codes if the processor does not recognize the Ignition Diagnostic Monitor (IDM) pulsewidth. In this case, coil pack failure codes may not be set since the fault filters can be erased before they reach the threshold that sets the code.
13) Intermittent Ignition System Fault
Vehicles with a Cylinder Identification (CID) sensor can light the MIL with no Continuous codes present if an intermittent ignition system fault is present long enough to activate the MIL and then goes away. The CID sensor can indicate that the fault was momentary and clear the coil pack faults but the CID fault may not register if the fault goes away fast enough.
14) Intermittent Open STI Circuit
If the Self-Test Input (STI) circuit opened during KOEO Self-Test or code output, Continuous Memory would be cleared.
15) Power Lost To EEC Processor
On some applications, the processor can lose power while the MIL stays powered. The MIL can light if a ground path is present through the processor.
16) Other Warning Lamps Mistaken For MIL
The MIL can sometimes be confused with other warning lamps like the amber Air Bag lamp if they are located near each other in the dash panel.
17) Development Testing Or Wrong Processor Released To Production
The MIL can be lit without Continuous codes during testing or if the wrong processor is installed" by Ford
 

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Discussion Starter #6
miesk5,
So the self test with KOEO will show codes that are stored in the continuous memory, whether or not if the code is suppose to be KOEO or KOER?
So these are the posts I like, getting in to the weeds to speak about Broncos.

Some follow up questions:
1. Is the hard fault code something the computer read during the last start-up cycle as opposed to the continuous memory code that can stay for up to 40-80 start up cycles?
2. Since the continuous memory code could stay for up to 40-80 start up cycles and I have replaced vacuum lines, EGR and Vacuum Canister should I erase the continuous memory code and see if the code 33 comes back?
3. With FAST and SLOW codes, I can only see SLOW codes running the quick self-test (using a jumper wire for the SELF TEST INPUT - SGN RTN). I may have FAST codes that are not displayed during my quick self test?
4. After following the steps with the EVP trouble shooting looks like the EVP maybe a problem, but if it was the problem why am I getting an EGR code vs an EVP code?
5. Was I on the right track with the new ECTs resistance reading vs the installed ECT?
 

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Yo First,
miesk5,
So the self test with KOEO will show codes that are stored in the continuous memory, YES

... whether or not if the code is suppose to be KOEO or KOER? JUST IN KOEO


So these are the posts I like, getting in to the weeds to speak about Broncos. ME TOO😎

Some follow up questions:
1. Is the hard fault code something the computer read during the last start-up cycle as opposed to the continuous memory code that can stay for up to 40-80 start up cycles?
When in Self-Test, the MIL is not limited to Continuous Memory Codes and will also flash other DTCs. Also, Continuous Memory Codes are erased from Continuous Memory if the original fault has not occurred in the last 80 warm-up cycles (40 cycles on some applications).



2. Since the continuous memory code could stay for up to 40-80 start up cycles and I have replaced vacuum lines, EGR and Vacuum Canister should I erase the continuous memory code and see if the code 33 comes back?
YES!
Note: Do not disconnect battery to clear Continuous Memory. This will erase the Keep Alive Memory (KAM) information which may cause a driveability concern.
  1. Run the Key On Engine Off Self-Test.
  1. When the DTCs begin to be displayed, deactivate Self-Test:
  • STAR Tester: Unlatching the center button (up position).
  • All others: Remove the jumper wire from between Self-Test Input (STI) connector and the Signal Return Pin of the DLC.
  • Scan Tool: Pushing the STOP button.
  1. Continuous Memory will be erased in the PCM.
Also, How to Clear Keep Alive Memory (KAM)
The PCM stores information about vehicle operating conditions and uses this information to compensate for component tolerances. When an emission related component is replaced, Keep Alive Memory (KAM) should be cleared to erase the information stored by the PCM from the original component.
To clear KAM: Disconnect the negative side of the battery for a minimum of five minutes.
After KAM has been cleared, the vehicle may exhibit certain driveability concerns. It will be necessary to drive the vehicle 10 miles or more to allow the processor to relearn values for optimum driveability and performance. (Distance is dependent on the vehicle application.)

3. With FAST and SLOW codes, I can only see SLOW codes running the quick self-test (using a jumper wire for the SELF TEST INPUT - SGN RTN). I may have FAST codes that are not displayed during my quick self test?
Fast DTCs are issued before slow service DTCs. These DTCs contain the identical information as the slow DTCs, but are transmitted at 100 times the normal rate. These DTCs are interpreted by special equipment at the end of the assembly line by the Body and Assembly Division, as well as the SUPER STAR II tester. After Fast DTCs have been output, Self-Test should not be exited (remove jumper, unlatch button, etc.) until all the Slow DTCs have been output. Exiting before slow DTCs have been output will erase any Continuous Memory DTCs.
Some meters in service detect these codes as a short burst of information (slight meter deflection).

Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) Format
Key On Engine Off and Continuous Memory DTCs




4. After following the steps with the EVP trouble shooting looks like the EVP maybe a problem, but if it was the problem why am I getting an EGR code vs an EVP code?
I believe it was a Ford tech group decision to place a hierarchy on certain component such as the EGR over the EVP. Guessing, EGR does the work and EVP Report on it.
Hence,
154469


DTC 33, 332 EGR valve opening not detected; "When performing computer Self-Test after installing this kit it is normal to get code...The computer is acknowledging that the EGR is permanently closed. This is your desired result. However if you get the following codes: 31 / 327 - EVP circuit failed below the closed EGR limit of 0.24 volts 32 / 328 - EVP circuit failed below the closed EGR limit of 0.24 volts 34 / 334 - EVP circuit failed above the closed EGR limit of 0.67 volts 35 / 337 - EVP circuit failed above the open EGR limit of 4.81 volts;Check your connection again; make sure there is no resistance in the harness;..." in Eliminator Installation Manual
Source: by Ryan

5. Was I on the right track with the new ECTs resistance reading vs the installed ECT?
YES!
 

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Another view point:

There are three sets of Codes:
  1. Key On Engine Off
  2. Stored Codes from Continuous Memory
  3. Key On Engine Runng
Some codes can be displayed in all three.
Some are Key On Engine Off (KOEO) only.
Some are Key On Engine Running (KOER) only.
Some are Stored Code only.
Some can be displayed in more than one set of tests.

In many cases the code definition can change depending on when it was displayed, i.e. KOEO or CM or KOER. That's why it is extremely important to know when the code was displayed to get the correct definition.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
miesk5,

Awesome, great information. I am going to swap out the ECT, then clear the Continuous Memory codes, then disconnect the battery, then go take it for a spin for about 20 minutes. Then we will see where I sit.

rla2005 thanks for input,
Some can be displayed in more than one set of tests.

In many cases the code definition can change depending on when it was displayed, i.e. KOEO or CM or KOER. That's why it is extremely important to know when the code was displayed to get the correct definition.
That's some good info to know.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
So quick update. I replaced the ECT, cleared the continuous memory and KAP. Took her for a 30 minute drive ran good. Came back, temp was the same as with the failed ECT, but no more codes. So I ran the KOER.

Got code 4, sat there for awhile nothing else came so I did a throttle wide open test. Got codes:
44: Air Management System AM1/AM2 issue
33: EGR Issues again
For Code 4 I have to do a in point test. Pub looks like I am trying to find a ground fault?
Two other things came up:
1. I have what seems to be a very light hissing/sucking noise come near the break pedal. When I press the gas it goes away and when I lightly press the break and I mean to the point where the break lights don't even come on it goes away?
2. When she gets warm she is really, really hard to start up right after you turn her off. Happened at the gas station and when I warmed her up for the KOER test (got her warm turned her off put on jumper wire). Sounds like she doesn't want to crank, just a low and long ruh ruh ruh, then after about 3-5 seconds she will start up. Sometimes takes a couple of tries.
3. The wire loom keeps melting that has the vacuum line to the Air Bypass Valve (passenger side back part of engine) right near the manifold. Its not touching and higher than the spark plug. I bought some from cable and ties and more, its supposed to be good up too 200F

Will have more work to do.
 

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Yo First89Bronco,
I've never seen a code 4 in any Ford publication. Try the test again.

DTC 44 (KOER); AIR system inoperative – Air Injection;
FIGURE YOU FOUND THE ISSUE "The wire loom keeps melting that has the vacuum line to the Air Bypass Valve (passenger side back part of engine) right near the manifold. Its not touching and higher than the spark plug. I bought some from cable and ties and more, its supposed to be good up too 200F"
".. 1. First check that the two vacuum lines are connected to the Vacuum Reservoir (coffee can) and the resevoir is in good repair with no leaks on the bottom. Frequently the can leaks or the vacuum lines are accidentally knocked off. Check the vacuum hose to the bottom of the TAB (Bypass) Valve. Check the vacuum hose to the TAD ( Diverter) Valve. Check the vacuum hoses to the TAB/TAD Solenoids. Then check your TAB/TAD Solenoids.
Then check your TAB/TAD Solenoids. These are common easy to miss problems. Once these are ruled out all that is left is: Thermactor Air Supply Hoses. One-way Check Valves. Main TAB/TAD Valves..."*
I

Source: by SeattleFSB

The Yellow Vacuum Line goes from the TAD Solenoid (driver's side forward solenoid) to the TAD (Diverter) Valve located at the rear of the Intake Manifold. You have to climb up onto the engine to feel the Diverter Valve or remove the Intake Manifold. I'd rather climb up using plans, ala a scaffolding type set-up; maybe remove hood depending on circumstances such as me now, w/ backache..."

&
The Pink Vacuum Line goes from the TAB Solenoid (driver's side rear solenoid) to the passenger side (adjacent to the Vacuum Reservoir Can) and down to the bottom of the TAB (Bypass) Valve. Note that my Pink Vacuum line appears Yellowish in this pic and is not yet connected to the base of the TAB Valve as I was working up a solution at the time.

&
Test; Key off. Disconnect both TAB/TAD Solenoid connectors and measure both solenoid resistances. each resistance should be between 50 and 100 ohms.

Source: by SeattleFSB

Pump Test; "...
1.Check and, if necessary, adjust the belt tension. Press at the mid-point of the belt's longest straight run. You should be able to depress the belt about 1/2 in. (13mm) at most.
2.Run the engine to normal operating temperature and let it idle.*
miesk5 note, beware of fan blades, belts, pulleys, hot engine, etc.
3.Disconnect the air supply hose from the bypass control valve. If the pump is operating properly, airflow should be felt at the pump outlet. The flow should increase as you increase the engine speed. The pump is not serviceable and should be replaced if it is not functioning properly..." by Ford


Slow Cranking With Engine @ Normal Operating Temperature;
Check both battery posts, cables, connectors & GROUNDS for looseness and corrosion. If you see corrosion on a cables' wires strands between connectors or lugs and leading into the insulation, peel back the insulation to see how far back it reaches.

by El Kabong @
"Cheesy clamp on end. Do not use for a long term repair. Only to get you home when nothing else is available. If you have one of these, suspect it before anything else" El Kabong @ Common Replies to FAQs

Check starter relay for looseness or rust to the inner fender. It's ground is through its body to the inner fender.
Check that starter is mounted securely and connectors are clean and tight.

Engine Block pic in a 94 5.8; "...The black battery wire goes from the front bolt of the engine mount (on the block) to this tab & up to the battery post, where a smaller black wire goes to the core support, providing a continuous ground path between the engine, frame, battery, & body..."

Source: by CodysBigBlueBronco (how much $???)

Intake Manifold to Block Strap Location pic in a 96 5.0
Source: by boss (bossind, Steve) at SuperMotors.net

it is between 2nd & 3rd plugs on passenger side
Heat Is Your Enemy!:
Ignition Control Module (ICM)
top three leads (for PIP signal) can lose continuity with the back plate (ground) on the module when the unit is hot. You should consider a remote mounted Ignition Control Module (ICM).

Ignition Control Module (ICM) Location pic @ distributor in an 89


it's the rectangular object with wires on right side.
Pic by Handy_andy_cv64 (Ed )

Take your ignition module off and have it tested. Have them test it up to three times. If it fails any one of those times, replace it.

Ignition Control Module (ICM) Removal Tips @ distributor; "...To remove the TFI = thick film integrated module you need to loosen the saftey "lock bolt" at base of the distributor so you can TURN the distributor for better access and removal but make a referecne mark so you can turn the distributor back exactly where it was otherwise you'll have to re-set the timimg so it will start and run properly. There's a special tool "ignition module socket, mfg by Powerbuilt # 648420 so you can remove the screws on the module to replace it BUT to test it you just need to turn the ignition key to the "RUN" position, engine off. don't remember what I paid for the "socket" maybe $15.00 range...?
Source: by our late friend, JKossarides ("The Bronco", Jean) RIP MY FRIEND...

Ignition Control Module Relocation & Modified Mount in a 90
Source: by Seattle FSB

Some other Stalls When Hot Tests without a Code:
Following can be considered for your 89:
" LONG CRANK—STICKING IDLE AIR CONTROL Article .
(IAC) VALVE—VEHICLES BUILT FROM 11/1/94 97-9-5 THROUGH 3/30/96
• STALL—AFTER STARTING WHEN ENGINE ALLOWED TO SOAK FROM 1-4 HOURS—STICKING IDLE AIR CONTROL (IAC) VALVE—VEHICLES BUILT FROM 11/1/94 THROUGH 3/30/96
FORD: 1995-1996 CONTOUR, CROWN VICTORIA,
"...After a 1-4 hour engine soak time, long crank times and/or long crank to start followed by a stall may occur on some vehicles. No further stalling or rough idle will occur after the engine is running. The long crank and/or stall may be due to the Idle Air Control (IAC) Valve sticking. Replace the IAC Valve with a revised IAC Valve if no Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs) are present."

Read more and see the IAC ValveTesting, etc @ Fuel Injection Technical Library » Idle Air Bypass (IAB) by Ryan M.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Miesk5,

Thanks for the info. With regards to the "code 4". When I looked at the tech pub for KOER test it describes the CEL lights flashes, it said if you get 4 flashes then 1 then any codes go to part C of the test pin procedures.
I dont have access to the pub right now to get you too a page number.
Also and recommendations on wire loom for that area of the engine. I caught it just in time that the silicone tube is good, just the wire loom is deformed.
I have to do some work this weekend and will try to get to it in a week or two.

I will keep posting updates.
 

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At the beginning of the KOER tests the computer flashes the engine ID code. 4 flashes equals 8 cylinder engine. After that the actual KOER tests start which also requires user intervention.
 
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