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Discussion Starter #1
Sorry, there are so many 4wd threads that I couldn't look through them all to see if this had been asked.

I could find this somewhere, but you guys are quicker than me, so.....

My dad has an old 85 beater F-150, but the 4wd has that stupid old Ford setup where the ratios were different and the truck cannot be driven in something like light snow or dry ground. What year did that change?

And also, after that problem was fixed, what were the most common problems with the new 4wd? Any certain things that seem to break on everyone's?
 

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The problem with new 4wd is that is push button. Yeah it makes it easier to shift but its also more of a hastle to fix. But as far as the ratios go i'd assume that if the front and rear gears are the same your good to go. Cause i know if the ratios are different in the front and rear you only want to use 4wd in sand or mud cause you will eithier screw up the gears, carrier, or driveshafts. Hope some of this info will help.
 

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im kinda new with the 4x4 setup, but I know if you have auto locking hubs that they break and dont engauge. Happen to my on my '93 Bronco XLT, when I bout it and tried the 4x4 I heard it tryign to engauge but they wouldn't lock up. Now I got Super Wench locking hubs, you lock them in and they go!!!!!
 

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Don't know what year it changed per specific models. But, the thought behind it was so the rear end wouldn't try to push the vehicle into a spin when in 4WD. If you are driving in snow/ice, 4WD should work just fine for you. The point is to not drive it in 4WD on dry pavement or on sandstone with above average traction.

The difference is minimal. 4.09 to 4.11 gears. Not going to grenade anything off road or on icy/snowy conditions.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well my Bronco is an 88 and I'm almost positive it's got the same ratios, but it has the manual hubs and manual shift, not the push button, so I was just wondering what some common problems with those were. Although my dad's 95 is a push button and it was a ridiculous fix compared to what i have heard manual cases are.
 

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Not all FSBs or Trucks are push button 4x4.

My 96 FSB is manual shifting but, does have auto hubs.
 

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Since at least '80, Ford has made the 1/2-ton (& maybe heavier) front axles turn SLIGHTLY faster than the rears to improve off-road handling. It makes the steering tires PULL the front of the truck thru turns. The front ratios are always 0.01 higher (numerically lower) than the rears. The only exceptions I know of are pre-'86 with 9" rear & 3.50 ratio. That's the only rear 1/2-ton ratio I know of that was also available in the D44 reverse-cut, but there might be 1 or 2 more. No 8.8" ratios match D44RC ratios. So if you have 3.55 in back, you have 3.54 in front. 3.08 in back, 3.07 in front. Etc.

The only disadvantage is that the tires NEED to turn different speeds, but since there's no center diff in the t-case, they can't if you're on a high-traction surface. But then, WHY would you ever use 4WD on a high-traction surface??? If you need low range, just leave the hubs unlocked. If you have auto hub locks, tough $#!+ - swap 'em.

The point is: it's not a 'problem' - it's a good design feature, and I think they still do it.

The problems with the 'new' 4WD systems are all the vacuum leaks, and the fact that you have LESS control over it than you do in our older trucks. Not many mechanical problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
They might still do it, but I know on my other Ford's (5 of them), I have no problem driving them on normal road surface. Plus, I do drive in 4wd because the area where I live has alot of sections that will be snowed over, then a mile down the road, the road is fine. I'd rather not have to stop every mile and lock or unlock the hubs and so on, thus I consider it a problem, though it is only my opinion.
 

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88 XLT & 95 EB said:
I know, but for the way mine is setup, I am wondering the problems those setups commonly have.
Push button 4 wheel drive problems usually mainly consist of the automatic transfer case motor going out, and when you push the button, nothing happens. There are other things related to this that can go wrong, but that is the main one.

The Auto hubs problem is that the hubs go bad. They try to lock while your moving, and make a horrendous grinding noise.

I've done it with my Jeep and I do it with this truck, If it's snowing, before i leave, i lock the hubs, and then put it in and out of 4 wheel drive as i need it. The area i live in, the main streets are usually really clear because no one has taken the time to plow the side streets. So i will go from wet pavement, where i don't use the 4x4 to packed snow pavement, where i need the 4x4.
 

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Thanks Steve, I was just going to ask about that that. I was told though that it was so your back end doesn't try and catch up with the front end.
 

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88 XLT & 95 EB said:
They might still do it, but I know on my other Ford's (5 of them), I have no problem driving them on normal road surface. Plus, I do drive in 4wd because the area where I live has alot of sections that will be snowed over, then a mile down the road, the road is fine. I'd rather not have to stop every mile and lock or unlock the hubs and so on, thus I consider it a problem, though it is only my opinion.


Just because you hit a spot where you do need 4x4 and a little later on you end and go back to 2x4 you don't have to jump out and unlock the hubs. Once you shift back to 2wd the frond DS is in neutral and the front tires don't give a crap about gear ratio compaired to the rear cause they are no longer tied together. Just leave them locked when you think you might need 4wd and if you do shift it in 4wd and your good to go. If anything it will splash the gear oil around in the front diff and keep the bearings from aquiring flat spots.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Yah, I know I completely phrased that wrong, I meant just shifting in and out of 4wd, but I didn't proofread until now. LOL, thanks for the help.
 

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So, what's the point in turning your hubs off when you don't need them if they don't do anything with the front DS in neutral? From what I've read here, it's a good thing to leave them locked...but I know that cannot be true (because if it were people wouldn't need hubs at all)
 

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Ziggy_Moto said:
So, what's the point in turning your hubs off when you don't need them if they don't do anything with the front DS in neutral? From what I've read here, it's a good thing to leave them locked...but I know that cannot be true (because if it were people wouldn't need hubs at all)

My uncle left his locked all the time. It don't hurt anything. Unless you have a locker, spool, or welded front. Then you risk throwing U-Joints on hard surfaces.
 

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Unlocking the hubs with the t-case in 2H allows the front driveline to stop while the truck rolls. Less rotating mass = better fuel economy & less noise/vibration/wear. New F-series' axleshafts are always turning, but they're so light that it's not a big deal.
 
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