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Sayulita Layta!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Tidbits, nut sizes, and bolt whereabouts are bound to change on various years. I replaced the brake pads and rotors on my 1996, use these pictures as a guide along with Chiltons or the Ford Service CD. I am not to be held accountable for anything! :toothless

1. Pull that big 'ol honky tonky thing in the driveway or shop.




2. Lift 'er up! Safely support the truck with jack STANDS and not the hydraulic jack itself.





3. Pull of yer big meats and feed your lug nuts to the squirrels.




4. Check out the condition of your rotors; if they are scarred go get them turned, if they are below minimum specs. get some new ones.





5. I chose Ford OEM rotors because the first pair lasted 12 years and they are made in USA!





6. Pick up your good set of Motorcraft pads






7. Okay back to work! Lean under the truck and unbolt the two on the back of the caliper (late models), earlier models were pins that you hammered out...






8. Gently pry the little clip jobber out so you can pull the caliper off the rotor. Set the caliper on the radius arm or the upper coil mount. DO NOT let the caliper hang like a horse.






9. Remove the locking hub. See here for details or just enjoy the pictures.






10. Say hello to your Spindle. Now is a good time to repack/replace your wheel bearings, seals, and check your blinker fluid. Go ahead and grease up those seals (late model is two piece) to keep squealing to a minimum.






11. Put everything back together the way it came out, checking your Chiltons or other manual for torque specs. Use lots of grease on the shafts and in the hubs to keep everything spinning freely and prevent mud/water/crap from coming in.




12. Compare old vs. new brake pads :popc1:






13. Admire you work





14. And tad-ah!



 

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couple of more items...

1. on the older models the lower slide pin is held in with a bolt...make sure to remove it before trying to pound it out...

2. you need to compress the piston back in to the caliper for the new pads to fit.
 

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Since you are pointing out safety info you might point out that it's a good idea to chock your rear tires too... Particularly on an uneven surface like a driveway. Maybe it's just me but I don't trust my parking break or transmission park pin to stop the truck from rolling over me.
 

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Just one more thing----was it Sig or someone else that had earlier mentioned using synthetic grease on the spindles and bearings? Because it's supposedly more waterproof than the dead dinosaur stuff?.............
 

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Sayulita Layta!
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
couple of more items...

1. on the older models the lower slide pin is held in with a bolt...make sure to remove it before trying to pound it out...

2. you need to compress the piston back in to the caliper for the new pads to fit.

1. I did not know that, thanks for adding that in :thumbup

2. YES you do. I used a c-clamp and a piece of wood to even out the load on the caliper bore. Be prepared to clean up some brake fluid though...


 

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MORTAL KOMBAAAAAAATTT!!!!
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1. I did not know that, thanks for adding that in :thumbup

2. YES you do. I used a c-clamp and a piece of wood to even out the load on the caliper bore. Be prepared to clean up some brake fluid though...


One thing I've learned, is to loosen up the bleeder before you bear down on that caliper piston. It makes old stuff come out, so you can put new stuff in the top, so old/nasty stuff doesn't overflow your brake fluid reservoir. Minimal brake bleeding might have to be done.
 

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I like to use the old disc brake pad with the C clamp when pushing the caliper pistion back in because it fits right in there.......

Good Luck ~ :thumbup
 

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Hey Stan,
Were the wheel bearing races and the other part of the seal already pressed into the hub when you got them?

Thanks.
 

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Thanks

Not to long ago i replaced all the braking components on the front of my bronc. Im 25, and while i do work on my own cars for regular maintence, i would have never tackled this project w/o your writeup stan. thanks a million.

also to the two posts before, i bought like a shitty lil tool from schucks for 4 bucks that pushes the caliper back in, not really needed but i like having tools.

To the other guy, when i bought all the gear for mine, they were not pressed in. had to do that myself. not that it is in anyway hard. just make sure you do it right, because if you mess up you have to repull the seal, and when i did that i ****ed it up and had to spend 10bucks for a new one.
 

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Sayulita Layta!
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hey Stan,
Were the wheel bearing races and the other part of the seal already pressed into the hub when you got them?

Thanks.
Mine were already pressed in which was a plus. I believe there are some threads on how to press in new races if you have to. The seals just slide or pop into place depending on which one you are talking about.

Not to long ago i replaced all the braking components on the front of my bronc. Im 25, and while i do work on my own cars for regular maintence, i would have never tackled this project w/o your writeup stan. thanks a million.
:thumbup Its the way I learned, glad I could give back to the forum.
 

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One thing I've learned, is to loosen up the bleeder before you bear down on that caliper piston. It makes old stuff come out, so you can put new stuff in the top, so old/nasty stuff doesn't overflow your brake fluid reservoir. Minimal brake bleeding might have to be done.
The Ric is exactly right! To all you ABS bronco guys....compressing the calipers without loosening the bleed screw is a BAD idea. That is the fastest way to get trash in that expensive ABS actuator. loosen that bleed screw and bleed the excess fluid off. When you are done, bleed the systems and top off with new.
 

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1996 5.0 Standard transmission, XL, bone stock bronco, manual 4x4 shift, automatic lockers
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