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Discussion Starter #1
So I got a code 628 and 629 both related to excessive torque converter slippage. Only the 629 is electrical fault or something.

I was reading and that's connected to the solenoid pack, correct me if I'm wrong. So this weekend I'm going to pick n pull to try a used one, only 20 bucks or so.

Which models can I interchange?
I have a 91 302 with e4od, could I switch one out with a 351 e4od? Or even like a f150 with e4od? Tranny ran smooth as hell before, so I don't want to waste money on a rebuild if I don't have to. I'd rather gamble with a used one. Or if that doesn't work I'll just buy a new one.

Also is there a way to inspect a solenoid pack visually? My volte meter broke so I don't have one at the moment.
 

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91-94 will be the same for you..

I would check the EEC before you even bother doing anything else. I had 625 628 and 629 and it was my EEC. Pull it and look for burn marks under the capacitors like this......
If you have anything like that you need a new EEC.


 

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Discussion Starter #3
That's been mentioned before, I'm just too lazy to figure out how to pull it. lol Looks like I have a project this weekend. Do I have to pull the dash to pull it? I'm gonna do a search on how to remove it.
 

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X2 on checking your EEC. Excessive fault codes are generally caused by damage or corrosion on the board.

The EEC is SUPER easy to remove. All you need to do is pull the trim panel by the parking brake pedal. That silver box is your EEC. Next, you'll need to remove the bolt holding the plug on the EEC. This is in the engine compartment. Its the plug under the brake booster with about 100 wires coming out of it. Loosen the bolt on the plug until it turns freely. It won't come out of the plug itself. Next, just remove the plastic bracket supporting the EEC to the wall and the EEC should come right out. Takes about 10 minutes the first time. 2 minutes after you've got it figured out. Then you just pop it open and see what the board looks like.

When it comes to electrical components like the relay, you should consider buying new first. The ones in the junkyard are going to be just as old as the one your replacing, so if possible, buy a new one and have some piece of mind.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm gonna check the EEC, I'm just on a broke college kid fund so anything cheap is great lol but yeah, do you know any links on how to remove it, I'd rather read about it before jumping in and messing some more stuff up
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Just read your edit�� thanks man. Now if only Friday could hurry up.
 

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yo Stone,
DTC 62, 628 and/or 1728 Transmission Shifts Hard TSB 98-4-19 in 90-96
Source: by miesk5 at http://www.fullsizebronco.com/forum/showthread.php?
LIGHT TRUCK:
1989-97 F SUPER DUTY, F-250 HD, F-350
1989-98 ECONOLINE, F-150, F-250 LD
1990-96 BRONCO
1997-98 EXPEDITION
1998 NAVIGATOR

This TSB article is being republished in its entirety to correct the vehicles listed.

ISSUE:
Some vehicles may exhibit a flashing Transmission Control Indicator Lamp (TCIL) and Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs) 62, 628, and/or 1728 may be stored in memory. These DTCs can be set by any internal transmission element slippage or potentially by torque converter slippage.

ACTION:
Refer to the following text when servicing these codes.

NOTE:
WHEN SERVICING A VEHICLE WITH A FLASHING TCIL WITH DTCS 62, 628 AND/OR 1728, DO NOT REPLACE THE TORQUE CONVERTER UNLESS PROPER DIAGNOSIS HAS PROVEN THE TORQUE CONVERTER TO BE THE CAUSE.

Always verify the customer concern. Proper diagnosis for DTCs 62, 628 and/or 1728 may require talking to the customer to find out if there were any other symptoms associated with the TCIL flashing, (i.e., shift concerns, erratic/early/late, proper torque converter operation, etc.), prior to noticing the TCIL flashing.

Prior to transmission repairs for DTCs 62, 628 and/or 1728 or investigating other causes, repair all non-related transmission DTCs first, then repair all other transmission DTCs other than 62, 628 and/or 1728.

Some of the other causes that may result in DTCs 62, 628 and/or 1728 are as follows:

- Aftermarket modifications (i.e., performance enhancers, electrical modifications, etc.)

- Missing shifts (some/all)

- Transmission fluid leakage (internal and/or external)

- Erratic shift timing

- Valves, springs or retainers in the main control/accumulator body not assembled correctly, binding or sticking

- Check balls missing and/or mislocated. Damaged, unable to seal/seat properly

- Higher or lower than normal line pressure

- Transmission fluid restrictions and/or level

- Erratic/inoperative vehicle speed and/or rpm sensor

- Poor engine performance concerns

Any vehicle system concerns that could cause the strategy to detect a perceived internal slippage or change in the expected rpm of internal transmission rotating components may cause DTCs 62, 628 and/or 1728 to set.

NOTE:
ONCE DTCs 62, 628 AND/OR 1728 SET, OTHER TRANSMISSION FUNCTIONAL DTCs MAY NOT SET.

OTHER APPLICABLE ARTICLES:

-94-2-26

-96-10-14

SUPERSEDES: 98-1-23

WARRANTY STATUS: INFORMATION ONLY

==========

DTC 628; "...I did things in a stupid-simple way when the 628 came up: I tapped into the TCC line, and attached a voltmeter between that line and chassis ground. While driving, I could watch for it to go between zero volts (meaning the PCM was commanding the converter to lock) and battery voltage (meaning the converter should be unlocked). It sounds counterintuitive at first, but that's a matter of perspective, I suppose. Anyhow, if you see the PCM trying to lock the TCC and nothing happens to the engine speed, or if you can give it a little more throttle and the engine speed rises while it's commanded to lock, then you're assured a problem exists. If there was an electrical problem, then the PCM should also be giving you a code 627 as well. The 628 indicates excessive converter slippage. At a steady cruise, say your 60 mph, if you tap the brake the engine speed should rise slightly, and then come back down as the TCC re-engages. This condition can be intermittent, and it's more of a mechanical problem than an electrical one. The fix for a slipping TCC is to replace the torque converter and stator shaft seal, nothing more. You'd be out a little over a hundred bucks probably, and a few hours' labor, if you get one through a reputable transmission shop. I wouldn't buy anything but an OE-type replacement. You may even be able to get a Motorcraft/Ford replacement through a local dealership, but I've no clue how much their price would be..."
Source: by SigEpBlue (Steve) at FSB

DTC 628; "...code 628 can be caused by a mechanical problem or electrical problem. First thing to do is to check power to the solenoid connector at the transmission. These solenoids are 12 volt solenoids, not 5 volts......I have attached a few pictures for reference. Unplug the transmission connector and check the VPWR wire for 12 volts first with the key on at the harness itself. Then if OK, check the solenoid resistance with an OHM meter on the 200 OHM scale through the pin on the connector coming out of the transmission marked TCC & VPWR pins. Should be 0.98 to 1.6 OHMS as MTB has said. I usually used a special transmission tester tool, but this is the only way you can do it. I have seen many of these code 628 in the past, and I'm sorry to say 95% have been internal Mechanical failure. These tests for the solenoids are only going to tell you if the solenoid is open or within spec. It will not tell you if a piece of junk is stuck in the solenoid causing it to bleed pressure to the TCC, therefore giving you a rough running engine, shuddering feeling or stall in 2nd, 3rd, or 4th gear caused by the Torque converter clutch being applied at the wrong time..." miesk5 Note, look in my site here for the connector pin-outs for Bronco, etc. in Trannsmission, Automatic, E4OD
by Fordace at lincolnsonline.com


Solenoid Body Connector Location; "...It's on the passenger side of the transmission. You'll need to remove a small heat shield (two bolts) next to the catalytic converter, and probably clean away a TON of gunk before yanking it. Ford wasn't too bright in designing the placement of this connector. The connector has a single press-in tab latching it in place, IIRC; It looks like this, and there's only one locking tab on it technically. But if you look at the bottom of the picture, there's one of those Ford-style mechanisms that should (repeat should) separate upon pulling the connector. You may find it helpful to pinch both sides of the connector while pulling on the harness (it won't hurt the connector). The corrosion can really be a bitch to pull against. If you still can't pull it off, you may find it beneficial to use a flat-blade screwdriver and apply some leverage to it from underneath. Make sure you've got plenty of light under there to see all..."
Source: by SigEpBlue (Steve) at FSB

DTC 62, 628 & 1744 Converter Overheat, High Line Pressure; "...E4OD/4R100 transmissions often have problems with converter overheat, codes 62, 628, 1744, high line pressure and low cooler. The OEM valve can close off critical converter/cooler circuit under high-demand situations, causing the TCC to drag on and glaze the lining at idle, or restricting converter/cooler charge during high load causing converter slip codes, overheat and lube failures. flow. Sonnax now offers an upgraded line-to-lube pressure regulator valve 36424-04K with a patented internal line-to-lube passage with anti-drainback check valve, and a revised balance-end orifice. While drilling the pump casting will allow full-time flow to the cooler circuit, it is not precise and allows converter drainback, causing delayed engagements complaints. A revised balance end orifice is built into the valve and ensures sufficient oil is fed to the end of the PR valve to keep the valve in the proper regulating position and further preventing converter/ cooler flow restrictions. This is a drop in replacement that requires no machining..."
Source: by sonnaflow.com

Solenoid Body Connector Location; ..."I just pulled an e4od out of a 92 and that connector is VERY easy to get to if you are willing to pull your carpet. There is a very convenient access panel in the center there and it makes reaching the top and sides of the tranny very easy..."
Source: by gunterelectric226 at FSB

Solenoid Body Connector; "...the connectors were changed starting in 95 for both the mlp senser and the solenoid pack. other than that they are interchangeable. the internals were changed in 95 for the better..."
Source: by thePUNISHER (Paul) at FSB



DTC 91/621, 92/622, 93/626, 94, 629, 641 and 652 indicate (shift) solenoid did not change state when requested by the Powertrain Control Module (PCM). DTC 566 or 629 indicates the CCO or SS3/4-4/3 did not change state when requested by the PCM. Possible causes & Pin-Point Tests in a 94
http://www.thedieselstop.com/faq/9497faq/maint/vra/vra06108.htm

Will get wiring diagram if you chose to troubleshoot
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Awesome, I would like the wiring diagram. I might as well trouble shoot, I'll pick up a cheap harbor frieght voltmeter. But your quote says 95% it's mechanical, would that mean I need a rebuild, if that's the case, or would trouble shooting verify that for me?

The reason I'm leaning towards the solenoid pack is because the 629 code

(629
(O,M)
Torque Converter Clutch circuit fault – Transmissions)

Would that be correct, I'm gonna pull the EEC to see if some capacitors got fried, but after that I would like to test everything else.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Ok, so I was driving and decided to turn off the overdrive button, and it shifts perfectly. I never got around to messing with the EEC, but is it bad to drive with overdrive off for long periods of time, my transmission is going to be rebuilt in February so I don't want to dump too much money into it.
 
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