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Discussion Starter #1
my daughter (just turned 2) was recently diagnose with type 1 diabetes. because of this, my wife has to quit her job to care for her. there aren't any daycares that are qualified to care for her not to mention the cost would exceed her income. i was wandering if there is any type of financial assistance that can subsidize our income. i work out of a union hall (i know some of you bitch about unions but avoid this here) which usually provides a good enough income for our family of 4. however since the economy has been terrible there is a huge lack of work and out of the 7 months this year i have been laid off at least 3.5-4 of those months. i just thought there could be some type of aid until the economy picks up to where i can work more steady, or my daughter is old enough to understand her illness enough to care for herself some.
thanks
 

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penis
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You can do side labor? where is the wife/sig. other? Are you divorced? Public aid (i know you may not want to but it does help til you get on your feet.) Changing your kids diet and getting exercise may help her get rid of it at the very lease help her control it and prepare her for what she would need to know to control it.
 

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Screw the Jeep Thing
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Type one isn't that serious, if I'm remembering them correctly. There has to be someone somewhere in a daycare that could handle her. Do you have any freinds that don't work with kids? Maybe you can talk to them about watching your daughter. Offer to pay for the classes if they're willing to do it?

Just some thoughts. Maybe your local Hospital can help you out with locating some care and or help...
 

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Type one isn't that serious, if I'm remembering them correctly.
:doh0715:

Type 1 diabetes is a disease in which the pancreas does not produce insulin. If you have type 1 diabetes, glucose builds up in your blood instead of being used for energy.
 

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'05 Excursion Limited
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Sorry you are in a tough spot. Don't be ashamed, this is exactly the situation these programs were designed for. You are trying to take care of your family. As long as you aren't abusing the system use it. Better you than some p.o.s. with 5 different "baby daddy".

http://www.dpw.state.pa.us/

http://www.pawic.com/
 

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'05 Excursion Limited
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Type one isn't that serious, if I'm remembering them correctly. There has to be someone somewhere in a daycare that could handle her. Do you have any freinds that don't work with kids? Maybe you can talk to them about watching your daughter. Offer to pay for the classes if they're willing to do it?

Just some thoughts. Maybe your local Hospital can help you out with locating some care and or help...
Seriously? No one will care for his daughter better than the mother. Diabetes or not, she will be better with mom around.

Back to the OP: Some additional things will be figuring out how to save on bills and expenses. Basically trim out as many of the little extras as you can, some you may not even realize are there. My wife is much better at that and with her financial planning we have done awesome with her cutting back to just part time 2 nights a week and me full time. She used to make 44k/yr and me around 30k/yr. According to our taxes last year together we made 38k. I'll ask her to post up some tips to help on that end.
 

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IM FAT, YOUR UGLY!
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have you checked for any state programs that pay for the long term care as a job like situation for your wife?
 

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Screw the Jeep Thing
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I know what Diabetes is, my mother has it, 2 of my aunts have it, 2 of my aunts have it.. and a couple of my friends have it. I know there is a couple types, just couldn't remember which is which. Which is exactly why I said "if I'm remebering correctly"

I wont get into the who mom working or not BS.. Thats not what this thread is about. If he can't make enough money to support his family he either needs to do 1 of 2 things... Get another job or mom needs to work. I guess he can live off of OBAMA like the rest of the country too if he wants too...

Have you tried talking to your union reps? Maybe the union has somthing that can help you?

I hope you get this all figured out quick.
 

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I know what Diabetes is, my mother has it, 2 of my aunts have it, 2 of my aunts have it.. and a couple of my friends have it. I know there is a couple types, just couldn't remember which is which. Which is exactly why I said "if I'm remebering correctly"

I wont get into the who mom working or not BS.. Thats not what this thread is about. If he can't make enough money to support his family he either needs to do 1 of 2 things... Get another job or mom needs to work. I guess he can live off of OBAMA like the rest of the country too if he wants too...

Have you tried talking to your union reps? Maybe the union has somthing that can help you?

I hope you get this all figured out quick.
There is type 1 and type 2 Diabetes, both are very bad and both lead to very serious health problems.
 

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JEEP CREEP
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Sorry to hear about your little girl man. I don't know how handy you are but when work got slow for me I made up some stupid little handy man fliers and past them out everywhere I could. Maybe you could do something like that if your not working or maybe on the weekends. I hope eveything turns out ok for you and your family.
 

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Screw the Jeep Thing
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Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. An autoimmune disease results when the body's system for fighting infection (the immune system) turns against a part of the body. In diabetes, the immune system attacks the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas and destroys them. The pancreas then produces little or no insulin. A person who has type 1 diabetes must take insulin daily to live.

At present, scientists do not know exactly what causes the body's immune system to attack the beta cells, but they believe that autoimmune, genetic, and environmental factors, possibly viruses, are involved. Type 1 diabetes accounts for about 5 to 10 percent of diagnosed diabetes in the United States. It develops most often in children and young adults, but can appear at any age.

Symptoms of type 1 diabetes usually develop over a short period, although beta cell destruction can begin years earlier. Symptoms include increased thirst and urination, constant hunger, weight loss, blurred vision, and extreme fatigue. If not diagnosed and treated with insulin, a person with type 1 diabetes can lapse into a life-threatening diabetic coma, also known as diabetic ketoacidosis.

Type 2 Diabetes

The most common form of diabetes is type 2 diabetes. About 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes have type 2. This form of diabetes is associated with older age, obesity, family history of diabetes, previous history of gestational diabetes, physical inactivity, and ethnicity. About 80 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight.

Type 2 diabetes is increasingly being diagnosed in children and adolescents. However, nationally representative data on prevalence of type 2 diabetes in youth are not available.

When type 2 diabetes is diagnosed, the pancreas is usually producing enough insulin, but for unknown reasons, the body cannot use the insulin effectively, a condition called insulin resistance. After several years, insulin production decreases. The result is the same as for type 1 diabetes--glucose builds up in the blood and the body cannot make efficient use of its main source of fuel.

The symptoms of type 2 diabetes develop gradually. Their onset is not as sudden as in type 1 diabetes. Symptoms may include fatigue or nausea, frequent urination, unusual thirst, weight loss, blurred vision, frequent infections, and slow healing of wounds or sores. Some people have no symptoms.

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes develops only during pregnancy. Like type 2 diabetes, it occurs more often in African Americans, American Indians, Hispanic Americans, and among women with a family history of diabetes. Women who have had gestational diabetes have a 20 to 50 percent chance of developing type 2 diabetes within 5 to 10 years.
 

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JEEP CREEP
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Or maybe your wife could try to find something where she can work from home. That way she can still be there for your daughter.
 

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'05 Excursion Limited
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Just another thought... are you involved in a church? If so, sit down and talk with the pastor/priest/whatever. Your church community may be able to help more than you realize.
 

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Satyr of the Midwest
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I've had Type 1 diabetes since I was five. :toothless

I would check for assistance at the state level, starting by asking for information at local pharmacies and pharmacists, since they seem to know the ins and outs of the system better than anyone else. I know here in The Love Glove, we have numerous programs in place to help those that need it. IIRC, some were in concert with BCBS of MI.

Hopefully you're already lined up with an endocrinologist, but if not, find one as soon as you can. Regular pediatricians are just NOT equipped with the specific knowledge to manage this condition, whereas a qualified endocrinologist can (literally) be a life saver. She should be seen every three months, and the visits should include Hb-A1c (hemoglobin A1c) testing, blood & urine analysis (checking for proper nutrient, microalbumin, ketone, and protein levels), height and weight measurements, and so on. It is CRITICAL that these appointments are kept, so that any new or dangerous trends can be tracked and dealt with accordingly.


To keep costs down, I'd suggest sticking with two things:

1. Regular syringes and insulin vials. No need to get a multi-thousand dollar insulin pump or other nonsense, especially at this stage. I've tried almost every type of device out there, and yet I've always come back to a good old, dependable, and cheap syringe & vial setup. Sometimes, you can get syringes for free, but again this will vary with the type of assistance or coverage you can find.

2. Be careful on your selection of blood glucose meter, i.e. do some research first. Some meters need expensive test strips; some may be covered under your state's medical program, whereas others may not. I'm using a Freestyle meter. The strips are a little over a dollar each, if I were to pay retail, and at four to five tests per day it's easy to see it can add up quickly. I know there are others out there that are much more expensive, but also a few cheaper ones. Accu-check makes an excellent product, and they're all US-made, IIRC.

I actually have a meter sitting next to me I got for free from my local pharmacy when my test strip Rx ran out, and it was the weekend. It's a TrueTrack, comes with a few test strips and lancets, and a lifetime warranty. Only had to use it a few times, but it's pretty nice, especially for a free machine!

I'm just gonna throw this one in here: NO HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP in her diet. Period. The only exception is when treating a low blood sugar and there's nothing else available. We diabetics fare much better when we eat natural sugars and carbohydrates (actually all humans, but us especially), such as those found in fresh fruit and produce. This is a great portion of the reason I've switched to locally-grown and/or organic foods. Win-win.

One more thing I'd recommend: use the BD Ultra-fine line of lancets and syringes if you are able. They're the sharpest on the market, and will help prevent callouses on the fingers and painful injection site irritations.

Best of luck to you finding what you need for your daughter. I know it seems like an uphill battle, but it will get easier with time. Rest assured there are thousands of kids out there just like her, and let her know that! Don't feel bad or treat her any differently; this IS a manageable condition, and she will live a normal, happy life with your love and support.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I've had Type 1 diabetes since I was five. :toothless

I would check for assistance at the state level, starting by asking for information at local pharmacies and pharmacists, since they seem to know the ins and outs of the system better than anyone else. I know here in The Love Glove, we have numerous programs in place to help those that need it. IIRC, some were in concert with BCBS of MI.

Hopefully you're already lined up with an endocrinologist, but if not, find one as soon as you can. Regular pediatricians are just NOT equipped with the specific knowledge to manage this condition, whereas a qualified endocrinologist can (literally) be a life saver. She should be seen every three months, and the visits should include Hb-A1c (hemoglobin A1c) testing, blood & urine analysis (checking for proper nutrient, microalbumin, ketone, and protein levels), height and weight measurements, and so on. It is CRITICAL that these appointments are kept, so that any new or dangerous trends can be tracked and dealt with accordingly.


To keep costs down, I'd suggest sticking with two things:

1. Regular syringes and insulin vials. No need to get a multi-thousand dollar insulin pump or other nonsense, especially at this stage. I've tried almost every type of device out there, and yet I've always come back to a good old, dependable, and cheap syringe & vial setup. Sometimes, you can get syringes for free, but again this will vary with the type of assistance or coverage you can find.

2. Be careful on your selection of blood glucose meter, i.e. do some research first. Some meters need expensive test strips; some may be covered under your state's medical program, whereas others may not. I'm using a Freestyle meter. The strips are a little over a dollar each, if I were to pay retail, and at four to five tests per day it's easy to see it can add up quickly. I know there are others out there that are much more expensive, but also a few cheaper ones. Accu-check makes an excellent product, and they're all US-made, IIRC.

I actually have a meter sitting next to me I got for free from my local pharmacy when my test strip Rx ran out, and it was the weekend. It's a TrueTrack, comes with a few test strips and lancets, and a lifetime warranty. Only had to use it a few times, but it's pretty nice, especially for a free machine!

I'm just gonna throw this one in here: NO HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP in her diet. Period. The only exception is when treating a low blood sugar and there's nothing else available. We diabetics fare much better when we eat natural sugars and carbohydrates (actually all humans, but us especially), such as those found in fresh fruit and produce. This is a great portion of the reason I've switched to locally-grown and/or organic foods. Win-win.

One more thing I'd recommend: use the BD Ultra-fine line of lancets and syringes if you are able. They're the sharpest on the market, and will help prevent callouses on the fingers and painful injection site irritations.

Best of luck to you finding what you need for your daughter. I know it seems like an uphill battle, but it will get easier with time. Rest assured there are thousands of kids out there just like her, and let her know that! Don't feel bad or treat her any differently; this IS a manageable condition, and she will live a normal, happy life with your love and support.
thanks for all the replies.

sig. yes we are in touch daily with an endocrinologist. we are also in touch with a nutritionist to help set up a stable diet to keep the highs and lows at a minimum. however she is obviously still in the honeymoon state so things are still difficult to keep controled. we test her sugr like 10 times a day including 3 while she sleeps and she recieves up to 7 shots a day. its a hell of alot for a two year old.as to the rest of your post, i do use the bd lancets and syringes. i guess i'm lucky in that my medical coverage through the ironworkers covers all of her testing supplies. i recieved two meters from the hospital when we were discharged. the are the one touch ultra mini.
 

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Truthfully...


What is a Union? I have heard of them but in my neck of the woods I don't hear of this.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Truthfully...


What is a Union? I have heard of them but in my neck of the woods I don't hear of this.


i live in western pa, the birthplace of unions. google pinkertons and coal miners union,or UMWA and you'll learn a little

trades unions are a bit different than you run of the mill grocery store union or fab shop. (I know giant eagle is now part of the umwa)
 

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ID has a pretty generous childcare reimbursment program, especially where there is a medical need.. PA may have something similar...

And it is sliding, so there is a consequence, it is not just alacarte. We don't have the union thing here, we have the antithesis, we are a right to work state. From what I have seen in the various construction fields I have played in, our Journeyman make $15-18 an hour. That seems to be the cap.

Sometimes I wish we were union. Just let my main client go, as my business was only making 12 or 15 an hour,at what he was willing to pay before hard overhead was calculated..
 

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i know alot dont want to hear this, but prayer is your number one problemsolver, followed and prefaced by faith. you are not in this alone, and it is not insurmountable. when our youngest daughter was born with a Cerebral Paulsy diagnosis, (and much more later) seemed like the end of the world also. my wife also had to quit work to care for her, just like yours. we trimmed down all we could, and applied for every gov't help program there was. yep, we lived off the gov't hand out for a while...i paid into it, i should be able to use it. so should he. he has paid taxes for years, now reap some benefits. the links that were provided before for the dept of human services will be your best bet. screw pride, and what others think of you. this is your kid's LIFE here. just be sure to fill out the paperwork correctly and completely, as there are many loopholes you can fall through. Church and family are your number one sources of support, as well as specific support groups for that particular disease. face it now, some of the stuff may have to just go back (if you owe and cant pay)...and your credit may get messed up. but so what? your child is the priority, and they dont put you in debtors prison anymore. when it comes to your child's health, all else is secondary...including bankruptcy. it sucks, but alot of us have been there, done that, and have survived to try again. you may find, as we did, that it is actually cheaper for your wife to be an at home mom, not to mention better for the kids, rather than trying to work and pay for daycare and all its related expenses (gas, lunch for your wife at work, after care, late pick up fees. etc.).

bottom line is...have Faith, be strong, and don't give up. it will get better, and this will bring you closer together as a family if you let it.
 
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