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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is one of those projects that probably does not need a write up, but sometimes its nice as a guy new to wrenching to have one, or at least a spot to begin asking questions. So, with that here we go.

Tools needed: A variety of smaller wrenches and or sockets.

Step 1 Disconnect your battery cables.



In this pic you can see two large positive cables coming from the battery. The cable on the right runs directly to the starter. The one on the left runs to the post on the window side of the starter relay.



The relay itself is on the passenger side fender (this is NOT the solenoid, this IS the starter relay). Note the smaller wire on the batter side of the terminal. This wire runs from the relay down to the starter.



Step 2. Locate your starter. On my 95, its located on the passenger side under the engine just interior of the stock radius arm bracket. Here it is:



Please note that the round cylinder juuuust poking over the top of the starters body. That is the starter solenoid. On the later years, the starter solenoid is integrated with the starter. If you look very close just on the top right of the nipple at the end of the starter, you can see the cable coming from the battery (its dark, sorry).

Step 3. That cable from the battery runs to a post on the top of the starter solenoid. Remove the nut and lock washer then remove the cable.

Step 4. Next, you will see the relay wire that is attached to on solenoid (yellow wire in my pic above). Remove the nut holding on relay wire onto the solenoid then remove the lock washer and the wire.

Step 5. There are two bolts that hold the starter on. You can see them in the pic below. One is to the top left of the starter, the other is on the bottom. I believe they were 14 mm.



Step 6. Carefully remove the starter. Make sure not to get it caught up on any of the wiring. Once its out, you will see ring gear on the flywheel/flexplate exposed, like this:



Step 7 – 12 – Do everything listed above in reverse!!

New starter installed:



Time: About 20 minutes if you take your time….

Hope this helps someone sometime!!!! Any additons, input or suggestions are appreciated.
 

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This is one of those projects that probably does not need a write up...
As many threads as we see about changing a headlight bulb, this is CERTAINLY a valid tech writeup! :thumbup
Step 1 Disconnect your battery cables.
This step isn't necessary if the starter is the old style with only 1 heavy wire (no small wire) since it's only hot during cranking. But it's a good practise on any starter with a solenoid, like the one shown. While they're off, inspect, clean & tighten all 7 terminals on the 2 heavy cables.
The relay itself is on the passenger side fender (this is NOT the solenoid, this IS the starter relay).
:thumbup :chili: :bday :twotu:
Step 2. Locate your starter. On my 95, its located on the passenger side...
Same for all FSB engines.
Once its out, you will see your pressure plate...
That's actually the ring gear on the flywheel/flexplate visible thru the starter hole in the "engine rear plate".

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That's actually the ring gear on the flywheel/flexplate visible thru the starter hole in the "engine rear plate".
Thanks Steve. I will make the change above so its accurate.

Nice, might want to add "Never leave a wrench on the battery!"
:doh0715: You are right....

Cool, motorcraft battery.

What brand starter did you go with? reman or new?
Love the motorcraft... got it new at Car Quest a few monts ago. Dont remember the price... but they arent cheap I know that!
 

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I will make the change above...
It's still a little off. :shrug A "pressure plate" is what pushes against a clutch, inside the diaphragm of the clutch cover. The starter never touches the pressure plate. And it doesn't touch the ring gear on the flexplate/flywheel except when it's cranking. So the only part the starter actually touches during installation is the engine rear plate. The starter bolts go thru to the bellhousing, but the starter doesn't actually touch it, either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It's still a little off. :shrug A "pressure plate" is what pushes against a clutch, inside the diaphragm of the clutch cover. The starter never touches the pressure plate. And it doesn't touch the ring gear on the flexplate/flywheel except when it's cranking. So the only part the starter actually touches during installation is the engine rear plate. The starter bolts go thru to the bellhousing, but the starter doesn't actually touch it, either.
Thats it... I am not doing anymore write ups :histerica

Okay, I just removed the entire portion because it didnt really apply....
 

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very good, and this is certainly a nice technical writeup many might be looking for.

Couple things, some already discussed:

-- no metal tools left on battery.
--this might also be a good time to replace that power wire coming from the battery (this big 4-6ga one).
--did you buy the starter from fireguy? or some other brand? is it working well, no issues, all happy-happy?? If you bought from fireguy he can also supply a nice 2ga cable that is pretty darn flexible. my stock cable from the batt down to the starter I left after a recent install of a 200A alternator. Only because I knew I was going to do the starter soon as well, and would then replace that cable.
--on your order of removal/reinstall, I've been thinking it would be easier to disconnect the starter/solenoid from the plate/bellhousing and then disconnect the electrical connections once you've lowered it where you can get at it better. but I have not done it this way so could be wrong.
--lastly in the pic it appears your yellow wire is rather close to the exhaust manifold? And why does your '95 not have the heat shield installed?
 

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Zombie Hunter
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di-electric grease on all your connections isn't a bad thing either.

That looks like an Auto-Zone starter, i can't remember the brand, but it's sealed and guaranteed for life. The guaranteed for life part is what sold me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
very good, and this is certainly a nice technical writeup many might be looking for.

Couple things, some already discussed:

-- no metal tools left on battery.

I know... my bad. It was supposed to be left there for visual effect but obviously that was a mistake....

--this might also be a good time to replace that power wire coming from the battery (this big 4-6ga one).

I actually did do that. I am gonna be doing a write up on that as well later. Your right though, if you have the cash, its a great time to replace the battery cables.

--did you buy the starter from fireguy? or some other brand? is it working well, no issues, all happy-happy?? If you bought from fireguy he can also supply a nice 2ga cable that is pretty darn flexible. my stock cable from the batt down to the starter I left after a recent install of a 200A alternator. Only because I knew I was going to do the starter soon as well, and would then replace that cable.

Its a Carquest starter. I didnt realize Ryan sold starters, but will make a note on that incase this one craps the bed.

--on your order of removal/reinstall, I've been thinking it would be easier to disconnect the starter/solenoid from the plate/bellhousing and then disconnect the electrical connections once you've lowered it where you can get at it better. but I have not done it this way so could be wrong.

Its actually really easy to access both cables with the starter in the bellhousing. I removed the cables first because I didnt want the weight of the starter pulling on the cables. I am sure it would be fine in either order.

--lastly in the pic it appears your yellow wire is rather close to the exhaust manifold? And why does your '95 not have the heat shield installed?
That wire IS close to the exhaust manifold. If you look at the pic closely, youi will see that there is actually bare wire exposed!!! I replaced that wire as well when I did the battery cable change and it is routed straight down and not up and around like that wire. Those doing their install might also consider replacing that wire or routing it differently if its like mine. There never was a heat shield there and I didnt even realize there was supposed to be one!!! Looks like I need to work on getting one...
 

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This is a tech writeup thread - it's only about how to change a starter. Post tech questions about diagnosing starting issues in the NBTQ forum; preferrably in a VERY similar old thread. But read SEVERAL of the old threads first, and try everything that applies so you can post your results.
 

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Thanks for the nice instructions and especially great photos. My Bronco had been in my garage for at least 6 months with trickle charger on new battery. Only been started a couple of times. When I tried to crank it today, it would only click. Cleaned battery posts and cable connectors, same thing. Pulled starter with your instructions and tested it. Worked fine. One of the screws had backed out on the solenoid. Anyway, tightened that up and cleaned up terminals on starter and wire connectors, hooked everything back up using dielectric grease. Starts easily every time now. Glad I didn't just put new starter on, which was my initial plan. Thanks again!
 

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Thanks for the nice instructions and especially great photos. My Bronco had been in my garage for at least 6 months with trickle charger on new battery. Only been started a couple of times. When I tried to crank it today, it would only click. Cleaned battery posts and cable connectors, same thing. Pulled starter with your instructions and tested it. Worked fine. One of the screws had backed out on the solenoid. Anyway, tightened that up and cleaned up terminals on starter and wire connectors, hooked everything back up using dielectric grease. Starts easily every time now. Glad I didn't just put new starter on, which was my initial plan. Thanks again!
Just so you know, dielectric grease is non-conductive, we've covered this many times. So you'd use it for spark plug boots to keep moisture out, but you would not put it on the terminals. Same thing with your new starter connections, I'd put the grease on after I bolted everything back down, not before.
 
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