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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
That’s good to have. I’m going to compare your videos to my startups. I’m also going to let my Bronco sit for a whole week and report the results…


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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Well… let it sit for well over a week and did the Doose cold start method. Wouldn’t you know it kicked right off. So cool! Like I said I never would have known that. Put a big smile on my face! Thanks again Doose!


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I would say your excessive cranking would be from your float bowl draining the fuel down into your engine.

The needle & seat attached to the float, that control the amount of fuel to enter the carb are not sealing properly, and when all the fuel leaks into the engine two things happen.

The 1st is you have to crank and crank to fill the float bowls with fuel again before it can feed the engine.

The second, and more concerning thing is that all of that raw fuel drains down into your engine each time, essentially washing your cyllinders & diluting the oil with gas, which kills the lubrication qualities of oil. This will take out rings & all of your bearings, so its pretty important to address this asap.

Check your oil, is it overfilled, and smelling like gas?

It's a very common issue with a carb that sits to have fuel evaporate & cause sludge & one little speck of that debris can cause the float bowl needle to not seat properly. The other possibility on an old vehicle is that it could also be caused from old rusty fuel tank & even the fuel lines.

The band aid fix, is to clean the carb, carb rebuild kit, & get an in-line filter on the fuel line so if your tank & lines are full of rust/sludge tank debris, that are not re-clogging things up, but be sure to check the tank & lines & if they are rusty inside, they probably need to be replaced.
Fuel in carb bowls does not leak into the engine if needle/seat does not seal properly, it has to go up to the venturies to get into intake tract.
The needles can not seat, flooding bowls and many times forcing raw gas into engine flooding it, but that is a different problem than float bowls
being empty (which does happen over very long periods of not running engine and can cause long cranking issues).

Here is a 2150 cutaway showing fuel tract. Engine vac is what sucks fuel through main jet and ultimately through venturi into engine.

 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Thanks OX. I’ll add this to my files….


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