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Discussion Starter #1
Ok folks i got a whine coiming through my system and i have an amp installed my question is wether the whine comes through the radio then goes through the amp or is it coming out the amp....Head unit is hooked up to to the normal radio hook up and the amp has 1 line hooked up to the battery and the other power line is hooked into the fuse box on the ingition switch..any ideas...thanks for the help...
 

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the wine could come from both, if it started when you installed the amp then, obviously its from the amp, the most common cause of it with an amp is running the signal wires along with the power, to eliminate it just run all the power down one side of the vehicle and the signal down the other, and make sure they dont cross. for the HU you can check to see if any of the power wires run near a computer of any kind, and you can also run a new power wire for it thats away from anythign else, also radio shack sells a little thing that filters the power wire to help eliminate that, its like 20 bucks
 

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i'd say that if u ran the wires from your deck with the hot wire(power) than that's what's giving u the noise. so a safe bet would be to run your hot wire away from the signal wires.
 

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But what does mine say?
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:stupid That's what I was gonna say.
 

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You will have to find it on your own.

That is one of the fun things about installing, troubleshooting.

My suggestion is to take the remote turn on that is wired to your fuse box and connect it correctly to the remote turn on lead on the back of your deck.
First of all, you always want to avoid wiring anything from your amp into your fuse box. The fuse box is where you get most of your noise.

Second make sure your amp ground is the same size as the primary power wire and also make sure it is grounded to the frame or to a point that is mounted to the frame like a seat bolt.

You should also take your deck out and make sure all your wires are hooked up properly and none of them have been cut or stripped by mistake. If for some reason your ground wire came loose from its connection and is just sitting up against another metal object that would create a lot of noise.

If you have eliminated all the obvious then just start troubleshooting from scratch.

If it is noise that you only get when the engine is on then it is most likely coming through your alternator. Make sure the amps power wire is NOT mounted to the starting relay switch. I have seen that to many times.
Make sure the power wire is mounted directly to the battery.
Check if there are any cuts or shorts in the power wire where it comes through the firewall.

Check your grounds on the amp, is your ground wire under 18 inches?

Is your amp running high and mids, or is it running subs?

If it is running highs/mids then you will want to source ground the amp to the deck. That can also create noise because of bad ground loops in your system.

DAMN I could go on all day long with troubleshooting a sound system, it is just one of those things you have to work out.
If you dont know what source grounding is please look it up or ask.

Good luck
 

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haaarrrrr haaaarrrr
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Beerman said:
You will have to find it on your own.

That is one of the fun things about installing, troubleshooting.

My suggestion is to take the remote turn on that is wired to your fuse box and connect it correctly to the remote turn on lead on the back of your deck.
First of all, you always want to avoid wiring anything from your amp into your fuse box. The fuse box is where you get most of your noise.

Second make sure your amp ground is the same size as the primary power wire and also make sure it is grounded to the frame or to a point that is mounted to the frame like a seat bolt.

You should also take your deck out and make sure all your wires are hooked up properly and none of them have been cut or stripped by mistake. If for some reason your ground wire came loose from its connection and is just sitting up against another metal object that would create a lot of noise.

If you have eliminated all the obvious then just start troubleshooting from scratch.

If it is noise that you only get when the engine is on then it is most likely coming through your alternator. Make sure the amps power wire is NOT mounted to the starting relay switch. I have seen that to many times.
Make sure the power wire is mounted directly to the battery.
Check if there are any cuts or shorts in the power wire where it comes through the firewall.

Check your grounds on the amp, is your ground wire under 18 inches?

Is your amp running high and mids, or is it running subs?

If it is running highs/mids then you will want to source ground the amp to the deck. That can also create noise because of bad ground loops in your system.

DAMN I could go on all day long with troubleshooting a sound system, it is just one of those things you have to work out.
If you dont know what source grounding is please look it up or ask.

Good luck
:wacko too much effort, just spend the $10 and install the isolator :thumbup
 

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Beerman,
Should I throw my $.02 in here or leave it to these other clowns? :thumbup
 

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Discussion Starter #10
:thumbup Hey you folks gave some good ideas but,hats off to drexelsteve.. :rockon ..he hit it dead on..I install a ground loop isolator and it cleared it right up....thanks
 

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Brieldo said:
Beerman,
Should I throw my $.02 in here or leave it to these other clowns? :thumbup
Exactly. I keep thinking to myself "Why did I spend that much time if they are just going to hold it all together with duct tape". :banghead
 

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What Beerman is saying is that a ground loop isolator is a bandaid for a headwound. System noise is caused by a limited number of things...they may be great in number, but theres only so many things it can be.


What you guys need to do is short the RCA inputs on your amps. You can do that by making muting plugs which involves soldering the signal pin to the outer shield. Stick them in the RCA inputs to the amp. Then turn things on. If you still have noise, you have a ground problem at the amp that is unrelated to the signal chain. Things to check are your ground connections or the traces on the board inside the amp. Alot of times, things can come loose when you're toolin arou nd with whatever and if hte ground connection is shitty, you get noise. If you have the problem of noise despite the RCA inptus being shorted, try grounding the heatsink of the amp. If the noise goes away, you have a broken trace on the board.


If the noise isnt there when the RCA's are shorted, you need to trace the signal chain. The best thing to do is get a different set of RCAs and see if replacing them fixes the problem. Alot of times, RCA's will get smashed and the conductors inside will come into contact with each other, resulting on noise being put into the signal, as the noise cancelling/blocking ability of the cable is lost. If the RCA's solve your problem, great.

If not, you need to start looking at individual components. First, check your head unit ground. If its through the stock wiring harness, you're a dumbass and you should be beaten with a blunt object :twak If its grounded to the firewall, you should also be beaten with a blunt object because alternator whine loves to be transmitted through the firewall. What I do is get a ground distribution block that is grounded to good, solid metal that isnt anywhere near interfereance from heater motors, alternators, spinning disco balls, etc. :histerica Good, so your HU ground is good. Next, if you have processors inline, try eliminating them and see if that makes it go away. If not, and you've already muted the amplifier and the noise disappeared...your head unit is probably to blame. If your HU grounds are good, the RCA's are good...you probably ahve some kind of internal head unit problem. In this case only, I would use a ground loop isolator, HOWEVER, personally, i'd get a new head unit because Ground Loop isolators kill sound quality....audibly! I realize most of you guys dont care what you have for stereo as long as it plays but I'm a pretty picky dude.


So, thats my noise tutorial. remember: Ground to the frame for your amplifiers, ground your alternator to the frame directly, and make sure that your other auxillary grounds are good...99% of the time, good grounds solve all noise problems. :thumbup
 

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Brieldo said:
99% of the time, good grounds solve all noise problems. :thumbup
EXACTLY.

I could have went into all that too, but as you said I had to quit rambling sometime,
Thanks for your helping hand on the load. :beer

It is funny how well we work together when i am not being a dickhead huh? :toothless :histerica
 

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I quickly scanned all the posts and never saw mentioned what brand equipment was being used. This could explain all!

Like Brieldo and Beerman said:
What Beerman is saying is that a ground loop isolator is a bandaid for a headwound. System noise is caused by a limited number of things...they may be great in number, but theres only so many things it can be.
:thumbup
 
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