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Discussion Starter #1
I own a 1995 351w, Idk if it's a stupid idea buying a performance top end kit (says 400 hp) or should I stick with the stock engine and upgrade something else? And if so what's a good start.
 

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If it is not a Bronco, it's just not worth driving.....
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It would really help if we knew what your end goal of the truck was going to be. Is it going to be a daily driver? an off road monster? stock restoration?

In my opinion the first thing to do to a 25 year old truck is to make sure it 100% road worthy. Make sure all of the suspension is in good shape, new bushings etc, transmission in good shape, steering, brakes etc.

If you spend a lot of time and money on an engine and your rear end craps out, then the investment in a souped up engine is wasted since it cant go anywhere.

One thing that is free and doesn't really take a lot of time is to pour through this forum and find out what problems, issues upgrades other members have had to see what you might check on your own rig for the same issues.
 

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Yo Justdriving,
Welcome!
See EFI Performance Upgrades by former member and Ford Bronco, etc EFI GURU Ryan M @ Ford Fuel Injection » EFI Performance Upgrades

And Ryan's How to Pick a Camshaft for EFI (BRONCOS)" @ How to pick a CAMSHAFT for EFI

Also consider:
MAF Swap in an 89 F 150 by Booba5185 @ MAF swap sensor
He wrote, "
I found the following cars used this MAF, while also using 19 pound injectors:

1995-94 Mustang 3.8L F2VF-12B579-A2A,
1994-92 Crown Victoria 4.6L F2VF-12B579-A2A,
1995-94 Mustang, Mustang Cobra 5.0L F2VF-12B579-A2A,
1994-92 Town Car 4.6L F2VF-12B579-A2A,
1994-92 Grand Marquis 4.6L F2VF-12B579-A2A

Mustang guys upgrade to these MAF housings because they are 70mm (stock Mustangs are 55mm), just like the truck's MAF housing. The specific MAF I ended up with was off of a 1994 Grand Marquis 4.6L, and it bolted directly onto the truck's airbox. Honestly, I think I could have dropped the new MAF into the truck's housing and called it good, but I just wanted to be sure. I wanted to update the thread for anyone who has these questions in the future."

MAF Upgrade in a 90 by Seattle FSB @ MAF Upgrade - Lessons Learned Thread

COLD air intake - insulate air intake from grille entry area to throttle body.
Air Tube & Box Insulation pics in a 94 5.0; Ken used Reflectix Insulation, avail @ Lowes. etc. ST16025 - 16" x 25 feet. miesk5 Note; Ken installed the K&N® & removed the cold air intake tube that runs to the top of the radiator; but he could have installed the intake tube section later.
One pic for example;

Source: by Ken B (Kenny's 94) @ 1994 Ford Bronco insulating air box and intake tube pictures, videos, and sounds | SuperMotors.net

Some use a 4.9 EFI engine's air intake inlet

Try Sixlitre Tune-Up @ ignition upgrade and timing bump (no 56K)

See Project M.P.G. in a Centurion 460; miesk5 Note, Results are Comparable to Tests in other Ford Engines
Source: by performanceunlimited.com
Some use this information while others write that the results are not achievable.
⊙●⊙

ASAP, find out if speed control recall work, if equipped was completed @ Recalls Look-up by VIN (Vehicle Identification Number); or @ Welcome to Ford Owner | Official Ford Owner Site; or ... have VIN ready. While there, see most Ford dealer maintenance/repairs done @ any dealership nation-wide.
"Summary: ON CERTAIN PICKUP TRUCKS, PASSENGER VEHICLES, SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES, AND MOTOR HOMES CHASSIS, THE SPEED CONTROL DEACTIVATION SWITCH MAY, UNDER CERTAIN CONDITIONS, LEAK INTERNALLY AND THEN OVERHEAT, SMOKE, OR BURN. THIS COULD RESULT IN AN UNDERHOOD FIRE."
See this guide by jowens1126 to confirm recall status @ 93 & 94-96 Cruise Control Recalls Repair
Note that the 93 recall is different than 94-96.

1995 Bronco Dealer Brochure

1995 Bronco Drivetrain, Powertrain Service Manual - Google Drive
&
1995 Bronco Chassis, Service Manual - Google Drive
To switch between folder list & grid views, click the button to the right of the "DOWNLOAD ALL" button in the upper right corner of the window) by HawkDriver

For any Bronco questions or to chat about it's planned modifications or build, it's better to post each seperately in Noobie Bronco Tech Questions. Flame free zone. This will get more attention and you can build up your post count to get into other sections such as Bronco and Ford Parts/Accessories (75 non-padded posts required to participate, due to scammers who preyed on our members).

To save you time and for better responses, please fill out your Bronco info with location, year, engine size, transmission type, transfer case type (manual or electric shift), locking hub type (automatic or manual) info & major mods such as a Lift, etc. .
Bronco info is now able to be put under your user name.
Click your profile button in the top right and go to account settings.


On that first page, named Account Details, scroll down to "Vehicle Info" and type in up to 100 characters.

Now you can simply enter your information in the text editor and click save.

Our Forum FAQs includes for example, How to Use Search and more tips!

See Baba Looey's Favorite FSB Links (lots and lots of tech links)
... Includes such as, How do I fix my back window?

Take time to participate in our upcoming Full-Size of the Quarter & Full-Size of the Year Contests @ Voting
You will get ideas by those competing. Also see the prizes. They are awesome as compared to other sites' "contests"!
Al
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well today of July 28th I found out I only have 1 issue, my bronco idles strangely, goes up and down and wants to turn off, and the bronco doesnt wanna give the power it can with this problem
 

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1994 Ford Bronco Eddie Bauer 5.8
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Agree with klh95bronco. Make sure everything is sound.

Could be the tps sensor? I had a bronco that idled high. Changed the sensor and cleaned out the throttle body and it fixed it. Its very inexpensive to do and probably take 30-60 min to do the entire job. Run the codes to see what it is.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I did run the code (only engine check code) but it came to a pass, I'll try that by tomorrow and see what happens
 

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Idle irregularities such as this are generally caused by sludge buildup. You need to remember that the vehicle is now 25 years old. In that time who knows for sure what maintenance was done. I always assume none and go from there.

The pcv system in the bronco requires periodic maintenance. To properly clean the system you will need some assorted sizes of test tube brushes, long handle stainless bristle brushes, 6 pack of brake Kleene, rags, and typical tools.

Start by disconnecting the intake tubes and any sensors plugged into them. Speed density versions have 2 individual tubes leading from the filter box to the throttle body. Inside the filter box you will find a small pcv breather filter that will need to be replaced. Remove the intake tubes. Then disconnect the throttle linkage. Remove the 4 bolts holding the throttle body in place. The sensor on the bottom of the throttle body is the TPS or throttle position sensor. If you replace it use motorcraft only parts. Also on the TB is a 4" long cylindrical valve. This is your IAC or Idle Air Control valve. You will want to replace it. You can try to clean it, but my experience has shown it's better to just change it. Beneath the iac there are some air ports. You will need to use throttle body cleaner and a small brush to clean all of that area. You will also need to clean any black sludge deposits off of the throttle body blades and inside the bore. I completely clean mine inside and out.

Next you should remove the upper intake. Its held on with 6 bolts. The center passenger side bolt requires a long torx bit, T45 size about 6 to 10" long which can be sourced on Amazon or at a fastenal store. One the upper intake you have your vacuum tree and the pcv dump line. I highly recommend taking this opportunity to replace every single hard plastic vacuum line with either silicone or rubber. The original lines get brittle and crack and eventually disintegrate. Then remove the vacuum tree fitting and the nipple for the pcv line. Get a plastic bin used to catch oil or coolant and use it as a wash tub. Spray down the inside of the intake with brake Kleene and scrub with long handle brushes. Go thru the TB holes and up the runners. Get it as clean as possible. Next, take a test tube brush, cut off the loop end of the handle and mount the brush in a cordless drill. Spray brake Kleene down the pcv passage and ream the hole with the drill and brush. This may take several cans of brake Kleene. Clean your brush regularly. Keep going till the brush comes out as clean as it went in.

Next, get a set of felpro blue 1 piece rubber valve cover gaskets. Remove the passenger valve cover. Clean the inside of the valve cover including the pocket where the pcv valve connects. Once clean, replace the grommet and pcv valve and hose. Reinstall the valve cover. To prevent future issues I would recommend installing a catch can in the pcv line between the valve cover and intake. Reinstall everything. Connect all the new vacuum lines and it should run better than ever.
 

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Yo Justdriving,
For the idle issue, see my Vacuum leak test in post #11 incl jowens126 HVAC Control Panel info & Mikey350 tests @ Help with dtc codes and idle

Excerpts;
When vacuum leaks are indicated, search out and correct the condition. Excess air leaking into the system will upset the fuel mixture and cause conditions such as rough idle, missing on acceleration, or burned valves.
If the leak exists in an accessory unit, such as the power brake, the unit will not function correctly. Or Air Conditioning when in MAX mode may switch to Defrost
.
 

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How long have you owned your Bronco?
How many miles are on it?

That would be the first two questions I would ask personally. These two answer greatly effect the direction I would personally go. Have you owned it long enough that you know it's had regular maintenance?

How's the suspension? Just because it drives fine, doesn't make loud noises etc - that doesn't mean that likely many OEM parts are past time to be replaced. Many times, especially trucks / SUVs like the Bronco, when people buy them and start to drive them, they think the performance is subpar and of course look to "upgrade". Many times these drive trains would perform much better if they were simply tuned up and gone through.

When's the last time your Bronco had a complete tune up? Spark plugs, good spark plug wires, distributor cap and rotor, air filter etc? How's the exhaust? Is the cat converter original? You know how many times I've witnessed older vehicles that were "down on power" and it was running the original converter with hundreds of thousands of miles on it and a replacement aftermarket converter instantly "made the engine run better".

Upgrading an engine is great - but keep in mind, especially on vehicles with a lot of miles - other components usually need replacing after a significant bump in engine power.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ctandc

I have replaced a decent amount of parts, whether they were working or not, spark plugs replaced, spark plug wiring too, drive shaft, sway bar bushings, radiator, (thermostats if that's important) cap and rotor (thinking on a new distributor soon) and I owned this bronco for bout 4 months, I got it from my dads brother that's been sitting for 4 years in his yard, and it got 200,000 miles, as far as I know, the engine is all stock.
 

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If the engine has 200K miles on it - it might be time. Just keep in mind that the transmission (if it has as many miles) might now like that extra power from a new / rebuilt engine. And if you are doing the upgrades to the engine piece meal (like say a valve job on the heads) I've seen rings start to fail with the rebuilt cylinder heads.

If it were me - I'd do a compression test then a leakdown test on the engine, then go from there. Problem with "upgrading" engines with high miles, when you start tearing into them you start running across more and more parts that are at or close to their service limit and need replacing.

Replacement engines don't have to be expensive. In fact, if the truck runs decent now - it's the perfect time to research building your own short block. Get a shop manual, some plastigauge and start researching. Heck, if you call around, shop around you can usually find a roller 302 short block built for someone else for a lot cheaper. Check high volume engine / machine shops. You know how many deals I've gotten on cylinder heads / short blocks / long blocks because someone ended up with a machine shop bill they couldn't / didn't want to pay and the machine shop just wants to recoup some of their investment (parts and labor).

HTH
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I do plan on upgrading my engine, whether be a kit or part by part, but right now i am pretty sure my suspension also is giving in it's time, so i might rebuild the engine and if so, would it be smart to buy a rebuild kit like this one or get mine recleaned
164493
 

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I do plan on upgrading my engine, whether be a kit or part by part, but right now i am pretty sure my suspension also is giving in it's time, so i might rebuild the engine and if so, would it be smart to buy a rebuild kit like this one or get mine recleaned
Generally, if you can afford the downtime, pull motor, strip it, bring it, the crank, and heads to a shop. have them check everything, bore out as needed, do any requested head-work, block work (chamfered returns, increasing oil lines, etc for your purposes, and then order the kit afterwards, that way you know overbore for sure, whether or not you need a new crank, you can get a better idea on your compression ratio in case heads or block needed to be decked, etc etc.
 
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If you are okay with your Bronco being down for a good chunk of time - sure, pull your engine and rebuild it. Or look around / call local machine shops / check classifieds for a roller 351 engine. They are harder to find than 302's but it all depends on if you can afford the down time with your Bronco.

Find a GOOD machine shop. Pull the engine, bag up and label EVERYTHING. Bag up and label by cylinder and valve the entire valvetrain (valves, rockers, springs etc) unless you are replacing it all.

I personally would tear down the engine myself. Saves money on labor and if you pay attention it isn't hard at all. Then take the block, crank etc to the machine shop. They'll clean 'em and see what machine work they'll need. Here's where it becomes REALLY important to figure out EXACTLY what you want before spending any money or time.

Do you want a stock rebuild? A bit more than stock? Here's where (in my lowly opinion) a lot of people go down the rabbit hole. First off - the engine is for a Bronco. Your goal shouldn't HP - it should be torque - more specifically low to mid range torque.

Block - normally a .030 overbore is pretty standard.
Cylinder heads - maybe it's just me - but there is NO WAY I'd spend more than $150-200 on reconditioning the stock cylinder heads. If I was JUST doing a valve job, new valve seals etc sure - but there are a lot of cylinder head options out there. GT40 for example - IF you get them cheap enough and they don't need a ton of work.

An internal combustion engine is a giant air pump. The more air you can flow the more power you can make.

I spent a good bit of time on a flywheel dyno years ago. We tried all sorts of stuff - since we had free access to it. One thing we learned was that even mild, close to stock engines, benefited from better flowing cylinder heads. Add a mild camshaft designed to make more low to mid range torque and it benefited from better flowing heads even more.

The problem is when you get to the point where you are pushing enough power than you need to tune / possibly modify the stock EFI to make it run right. Read time and $$$$

It's almost always a money vs time scale. If you have more time than money - do the research ahead of time and do it all (but the machine work) yourself. Heck you know how many 400+ HP small block chevys (many of them strokers) I built in my shed back in the day? Using a decent scale and plastigauge, I even balanced and blueprinted them myself. Attention to detail goes a LONG way and if you do find a good engine builder with an eye for detail, they aren't cheap - and if they are reasonably-priced - they are usually backed up for months.

If it were me - and the Bronco was going to be driven a lot - I'd clean up the block, new pistons, rings and bearings. If the stock heads are okay - get a basic valve job and look up how to improve the flow of the heads yourself (plenty of info out there), throw in a mild cam, headers, a decent flowing exhaust system, clean / rebuild the injectors and make sure the rest of the EFI system is up to snuff, install it, run it, then add gears and enjoy your truck.

I'm sure opinions vary.
 
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