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i recently ran into some overheating and decided the thermostat needed to be replaced. however, when i went to replace it i found it was impossible to wrench off the bolts because of the water pump and location of the thermostat housing. what kind of wrench do you need to get these bolts off?
 

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i recently ran into some overheating and decided the thermostat needed to be replaced. however, when i went to replace it i found it was impossible to wrench off the bolts because of the water pump and location of the thermostat housing. what kind of wrench do you need to get these bolts off?
:rofl: Funny you ask. I am looking for the same thing. I asked this in a different thread that somehow disapeared.:shrug

I have been looking at different wrenches at Harbor Freight to see if any of the different shapes will work. I have seen people mention cutting a 1/2" wrench in half. So I imagine a stubby 1/2" wrench would work. But I am looking for other options. Let's hope someone can shed some light on this for us!:beer
 

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First drain the coolant below the T-stat/lower intake manifold level so you don't make mess all over then "liberally" soak the bolts on the T-stat housing with PB Blaster and that should help free them up.

Usually the top 1/2" bolt is easer but for the lower one I cut a cheap open end 1/2" wrench in half to work in that tight spot and you can put a metal tube on the cut end for a bit more leverage, small turns and patience gets it out. Look over the threads and see what shape their in, wire wheel cleans them up nicely but if they questionable replace them, anti-seize prevents rust but I'm sure most will suggest loc-tite...your call

Also wire wheel the T-stat housing to clean off any gasket debris then check to see if it's flat/smooth, take a metal file if necessary so when re-installing it you get a nice fit and it won't leak. Clean off the end of the intake manifold where the T-stat housing bolts to and using a good RTV sealer, I like Ultra Copper because it sets up quickly so when installing the T-sat it won't move around, make sure it goes in the correct way and it's centered in the round ridge, sealer then gasket let it dry, install. Permatex form a gasket is another good sealer but it takes much longer to set up and dry. Use a good quality gasket there because most of the ones in the box are thin and flimsey and it will leak from the bottom.

Hand thread the 2 bolts and don't over tighten or you'll will crack the housing most of which are aluminum so bottom out the bolts and snug tight with hand/wrench = 12-15lbs torque max, done. Go back in a few days and recheck bolts, they can become loose from heat expansion/contraction.

Now might be a good time to "backflush" the cooling system since your're draining coolant anyway if you haven't done it in a while. Wash any reusable radiator/bypass/heater hoses in detergent to remove the rusty residual inside and the engine will run a bit cooler internally, the radiator and heater core get cleaned and you'll have nice heat if you live in a cold climate...


Good Luck ~ :thumbup
 

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I think I loosened it with a wrench, then spun it with my fingers the rest of the way out.
 

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I went out and bought a cheap home depot stubby wrench set just to do this. I've since replaced it with a better Gearwrench wratcheting set but any stubby will get the job done. I second what JKoss said use anti-sieze on the bolts of the water pump and thermostat, I also use copper grade.
 

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Are yours that much different than my 93? I was just working on mine and could get to both bolts just fine with a socket and extension. Now, I ended up snaping a bolt which was corroded and ended up leading to a series of problems that require a lot of time and work but thats besides the point.
 

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Are yours that much different than my 93? I was just working on mine and could get to both bolts just fine with a socket and extension. Now, I ended up snaping a bolt which was corroded and ended up leading to a series of problems that require a lot of time and work but thats besides the point.
The way the thermostat neck bends I couldnt get a socket on mine, regular or XL wrench wouldnt get on it either. Had to buy a stubby.
 

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Success!!:drinkbud

I just removed both bolts. I also had to purchase a stubby 1/2" wrench. And after about 15 minutes of slooooowly turning the right bolt it finally came out. Now time to clean everything up and put it back together with new bolts!:rockon

G/L with your removal FullSizeBronco1990. :beer
 

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I think all Automotive engineers should be forced to work in the service
department for at least a year before they are allowed to design anything...
Back in the old days there were automotive engineers on certain hobby
newsgroups and they blamed the MBAs for getting impatient and taking
the design away from them before they were finished. But like they said,
at some point somebody has -got- to take the project away from an
engineer because they are never-ever really finished with it! LOL :)

The Ford company is ran-by and the work-force is made-up of people. :/
Who you gonna blame? huh? ;)

My personal favorite is to blame "middle management" in general and
MBAs specifically. LOL :) My step father always cussed the MBAs and
swore the new MBAs were the ones that ruined the Southern Pacific.

YMMV

Alvin in AZ
ps- All the Robert Shaw type thermostat look to be made on the same
equipment by one outfit so might as well go for the best price...
http://www.panix.com/~alvinj/file12/CylinderWear.png
http://www.panix.com/~alvinj/file12/RobertShaw.jpeg
http://www.panix.com/~alvinj/file12/RobertShaw.jpg
pps- I don't have a picture but I took a basically useless 1" socket and
cut into it with a cutoff blade and knocked out the chunks so it's fit the
handle of a boxed end wrench. Kinda the same as J.Owens' cool tool,
it's just it didn't take any welding is the -only- advantage. :)
ppps- Jonathan's idea is cool too, BTDT but it was 5/8" socket for a
different situation. Anyway, modified tools are cool! IMO :)
pppps- I don't remember that particular bolt being a problem tho. LOL :)
 

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I like Ultra Copper because it sets up quickly so when installing the T-sat it won't move around, make sure it goes in the correct way and it's centered in the round ridge, sealer then gasket let it dry, install. Permatex form a gasket is another good sealer but it takes much longer to set up and dry. Use a good quality gasket there because most of the ones in the box are thin and flimsey and it will leak from the bottom.
Pay attention to this part. Like he says go ahead and glue the thermostat in its home inside the housing before you install it. Let it dry for a few hrs b/c if its not in that little ridge when you go to tighten it up it will break the housing.
 

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