Bronco Forum - Full Size Ford Bronco Forum banner
1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Apparently my TPS needs to be replaced:



Code 63 = Throttle Position (TP) circuit fault, below minimum voltage

If I am correct, it is located here:



That looks like a royal pain in the @$$ to replace, my question is ...

Is there some nifty trick that you guys can share to replacing this without a major headache ?

ps. my nifty little code reader was $31 delivered to my front door :chili:
 

·
~*~*~*~*~*~*~
Joined
·
10,473 Posts
Yes thats it. Looks like a royal PITA, but really it should take no more than a half hour to replace. Just unhook your intake tubes and undo the 4 bolts holding the throttle body on, and maybe a small coolant line and that should have you at the point to replace your TPS. And remember to clear your codes too. You could have save your $31 by using a test light and a paper clip. Sometimes its easier to break the old TPS off so you can put a pair of pliers on the screws because since they've been in there so long, its easy to strip out the heads with a screwdriver. Oh and you'll need a new gasket too for your throttle body.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ah Thanks. I don't mind the $31 - I read about reading the codes manually and counting flashes didn't appeal to me :)
 

·
OUT OF BUSINESS / M.I.A
Joined
·
4,658 Posts
Ah Thanks. I don't mind the $31 - I read about reading the codes manually and counting flashes didn't appeal to me :)


Don't let Steve83 hear you say that. Cuz he thinks we're all just flushing money down the throne.................:smokin:
 

·
Satyr of the Midwest
Joined
·
17,738 Posts
Don't let Steve83 hear you say that. Cuz he thinks we're all just flushing money down the throne.................:smokin:
Well, you really ARE if you merely pull a code and go replace a sensor. That's just about the dumbest thing to do. DIAGNOSE, TEST, SERVICE. Not the other way 'round.

Also, code readers are for girls. :goodfinge
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well, you really ARE if you merely pull a code and go replace a sensor. That's just about the dumbest thing to do. DIAGNOSE, TEST, SERVICE. Not the other way 'round.

Also, code readers are for girls. :goodfinge
So ... using a tool designed to interface with the computer is for girly men? Okay. It does more than read codes. But I am sure you know that.

Hey, if you prefer to count das blinkenlights more power too ya! :drinkbud

ACHTUNG!
ALLES TURISTEN UND NONTEKNISCHEN LOOKENPEEPERS!
DAS KOMPUTERMASCHINE IST NICHT FÜR DER GEFINGERPOKEN UND MITTENGRABEN! ODERWISE IST EASY TO SCHNAPPEN DER SPRINGENWERK, BLOWENFUSEN UND POPPENCORKEN MIT SPITZENSPARKSEN.
IST NICHT FÜR GEWERKEN BEI DUMMKOPFEN. DER RUBBERNECKEN SIGHTSEEREN KEEPEN DAS COTTONPICKEN HÄNDER IN DAS POCKETS MUSS.
ZO RELAXEN UND WATSCHEN DER BLINKENLICHTEN.​
 

·
Forward Some Money
Joined
·
5,087 Posts
Well, while everyone else argues over tools and penis size:chili:.......while you have the TB off, take a toothbrush and some TB cleaner and scrub the inside.

Pretty sure you will also need to do an idle reset.
 

·
Satyr of the Midwest
Joined
·
17,738 Posts
Keep in mind that's a 'last resort' operation. Messing with the idle stop screw is serious business. :toothless No, really, it has the potential to create more problems than it solves.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,995 Posts
If on the odd chance you HAVE to replace the TPS be aware that there are 2 types both have spring loaded rings in the center with "Tanges" (little tabs) that engage the TB shaft tab.

The first type has elongated slots for the screws and can actaully be adjusted/moved for proper voltage setting using a mulitmeter.

Clean the TB with TB cleaner only, replace the gasket and the performance will be greatly improved.................

The second type is a plug & play, voltage setting is automatic when connected, this is where you put the TPS in your hand turn a bit CCW then put it on the the TB shaft tab on the bottom and turn CC to line up the screw holes, tighten and you're done.

On either TPS style make sure you scribe the current position for reference with a magic marker! Check out "Ultimate Throttle Body" which has lots of pictures on cleaning and TPS etc. posted by Xris IIRC..............

Using the idle stop screw should only be used for base line idle adjustment so "search" Steve83's thread for more in depth information regarding this ~

Good Luck ~ :thumbup
 

·
OUT OF BUSINESS / M.I.A
Joined
·
4,658 Posts
Hey JK, didja finally get the Bronk going? I was gonna call you last week (when it was hot and sunny) to see if you wanted to meet up at PV Cove for a chat and a beer---but couldn't find your number.............
 

·
Forward Some Money
Joined
·
5,087 Posts
Keep in mind that's a 'last resort' operation. Messing with the idle stop screw is serious business. :toothless No, really, it has the potential to create more problems than it solves.
I guess this is the proper thread.....would you mind elaborating? I am trying to adjust my brain to all this. There is a ton of "mis-information" and "someone said" stuff going around. I am trying to fix an idle stumble myself on a 5.0 HO in an older vehicle.

I was told that when you swap out a TPS you need to readjust the base idle. Is this not true?

Thanks Sig
 

·
Satyr of the Midwest
Joined
·
17,738 Posts
It's the PCM's job to adjust the idle speed. When you mess with the throttle stop screw, you're messing with the amount of air that's going to be allowed around the throttle blade, which can lead to the PCM not being able to control idle speed at all, especially on warm days.

On older EEC-IV PCMs (say, before 1992 for our trucks), it's important to have the TP voltage in the range of about 0.8 to 0.95V, as many of those programs used 1.0V as a 'threshold' for off-idle, i.e. the driver wants to go! The same is true for most Fox-body Mustangs (I own a few of those too :toothless ). On the later Broncos, the throttle-closed TP voltage is of less consequence; it will automagically 'remember and update' the minimum TP voltage observed, which is a much more intelligent way of going about ascertaining throttle-closed position.

It's also important to remember that for idle speed to be correct, all of the other systems that can affect it must be functioning near-perfect. PCV, the vacuum controls (TAB, TAD, FPR, EVR), brake booster, MAP, CANP, etc. and all of the intake manifold gaskets and fittings MUST not leak or allow too much/not enough air to enter the manifold. It's sometimes a balancing act on crack, because the engine has virtually ZERO load on it at idle. So any additional air WILL increase idle speed in a seemingly disproportionate amount. IIRC, Ford targets the IAC to have a duty cycle of around 40% when the engine is new and is at SAE-rated standard temperature, pressure, and humidity.

If the vehicle was running fine before the TP went to shit, it should be just fine replacing the TP sensor with no other adjustment.
 

·
Forward Some Money
Joined
·
5,087 Posts
Thanks for the insight. I guess I leaned toward believing it b/c my new TPS was sloppy around the 2 mounting screws.

In view of your response, you get 2 "get outta Michigan points". If you can help me figure out my stumble (starting new thread in Anything Else) I may be forced to cheer for Michigan in the next OSU matchup. :whiteflag
 

·
Satyr of the Midwest
Joined
·
17,738 Posts
Nope. That's the ONLY year of Bronco you absolutely need an electronic tool for, due to the requisite OBD-II system. Maybe I should've said code readers for anything but OBD-II.

Let me add something: if you're hard of hearing, or you have not-so-good vision, THEN I can advocate using a reader over a paperclip. But for the average Joe, there's no justification for spending money on something that can be done for free, IMHO.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top