Bronco Forum - Full Size Ford Bronco Forum banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
648 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Help me figure out what this is.

1. tick tick tick so loud I can hear it while driving with windows up.
2. sounds like driver side engine when I'm outside the truck
3. sounds like driver side firewall inside the truck
4. I used a vac hose to look for exhaust leaks and found small header gasket leak. Fixed gasket, no leaks, sound is still there.
5. quiet tick at idle in neutral
6. gets louder in gear in neutral
7. even louder while driving, especially under load
8. can't hear it if you let off the gas and cruise
9. ticks in rhythm with the engine

I thought it was an exhaust leak, sounds like an exhaust leak, but I've taken the rubber hose all over the exhaust and can't find it.

I took a wooden dowel and could hear the tick when I hold the dowel to the driver valve cover. I pulled the cover and retorqued rockers and still have it.

Do lifter ticks get louder under load?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,893 Posts
Sounds like an exhaust leak, especially if its quieter idling in netural then gets louder when put in gear. Sometimes you can check it by pulling the spark plug wire to one cylinder at a time to cut the spark off. If the noise goes away then thats the cylinder thats causing the problem. However there is other types of noises, like a rod knock, that that will work to quiet down too so it doesn't guarantee its an exhaust leak, it just tells you which cylinder is causing it.
 

·
Nvr Been Bnnd
Joined
·
8,675,443 Posts
I've found that by depressing the loud pedal fully for long periods of time it will properly diagnose any engine noises.:rofl:

p.s. not responsible for accidents, injurys, getting to work late, or missing beer:beer



yank a valve cover youll see the problem im sure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
648 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Good advice guys. I did check the pushrods when I pulled the valve cover.

I'm going to try Mike2's tip and pull plug wires 1 by 1 to see if that narrows it down any.

I'll even check the EGR tube.

The truck runs great BTW. Just noisy as hell. I had to let off the gas to pass someone today because I was embarrassed about the noise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
I have the same thing currently, and the truck runs great just noisy and sounds like an exhaust leak. If I find anything I'll certainly let you know too, and I've also checked the headers too. The plug idea is an AWESOME idea btw!

:beer

Tony
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,070 Posts
I had the same tick, tick, tick, and replaced the lifters and pushrods and stuff. Still there only it sounded better, finally got around to rebuilding the motor and come to find out, one of the pistons had a 1 inch sized hole blown out of the top of it.
The funny thing about it, when I bought it, it had that same exact tick it never got better or worse for 2 years. It was really kinda of strange, I always knew I was kinda underpowered for a 5.8HO, but I never expected a hole in the top of a piston.

Just another idea to look at.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
26,292 Posts
yo,
Ticking could be a Secondary Air check valve that rusts out or it's tubing; mine was rusted badly and caused an exhaust leak type sound a few yrs ago; louder on acceleration of course. here it is in a diagram by Steve83; or air diverter valve.


for Ford PNs on any above get it in;
Vehicle Emission Control Information (VECI) Decal, Vacuum Diagrams & Calibration Parts List for 88 & UP. On-Line for Free at Ford. Click "Quick Guides" in left panel; Scroll to & CLICK VECI Labels "Provides Vehicle Emission Control Information (VECI) and a related calibration parts list." Enter applicable info (need to know your Calibration number from your B-pillar sticker). Vacuum Diagram is the same as the one on the core support or hood or air filter cover.
Source: by Ford @ http://www.motorcraftservice.com
an example of my 96.50 Parts List; CALIBRATION: 6-53E-R10:

SENSOR ASSY, Catalyst Exhaust Gas Oxygen Monitor- DOWNSTREAM F65F 9G444-CA F65Z 9G444-C
RESERVIOR ASSY, EGR Vacuum F4UE 9E453-CA F4UZ 9E453-C
CONTROL ASSY, EGR Vacuum Regulator FOTE 9J459-A1A FOTZ 9J459-A
SENSOR ASSY, EGR Pressure Valve F48E 9J460-BA, BB F4ZZ 9J460-B
VALVE ASSY, Thermactor Air Control Solenoid Vacuum E7TE 9H465-AA E7TZ 9H465-A
VALVE ASSY, Thermactor Air Control Solenoid Vacuum E7TE 9H465-BA E7TZ 9H465-B
SENSOR ASSY, Exhaust Gas Oxygen - UPSTREAM F68F 9F472-AA F68Z 9F472-A
VALVE ASSY, EGR F27E 9D475-A2B, A4B F2TZ 9D475-A
TUBE ASSY, EGR Valve to Exhaust Manifold F6TE 9D477-ED, EE F6TZ 9D477-E
PUMP ASSY, Thermactor E5TE 9A486-DB E5TZ 9A486-D
VALVE ASSY, Thermactor Check - Hose Nipple One End-Press in Tube Other End - DOWNSTREAM E8DZ 9A487-A
VALVE ASSY, Thermactor Check - 3/4-14 Thread One End-Hose Nipple One End - UPSTREAM E9VZ 9A487-A
VALVE ASSY, Thermactor Control E9AE 9F491-AA F0AZ 9F491-A
INJECTOR ASSY, Fuel F2TE 9F593-A3A F2TZ 9F593-A
VALVE ASSY, Throttle Air By-Pass F4TE 9F715-AA F4TZ 9F715-A
REGULATOR ASSY, Fuel Charging Pressure F4TE 9C968-BA F4TZ 9C968-B
POTENTIOMETER ASSY, Throttle Position Sensor F6TF 9B989-AA F6TZ 9B989-AA
DISTRIBUTOR ASSY F2TE 12127-BA F2TZ 12127-BA
SENSOR ASSY, Mass Airflow F5UF 12B579-BA F5UZ 12B579-BA
SENSOR ASSY, Engine Electronic Control Coolant Temperature F5AF 12A648-AA F5AZ 12A648-A
PROCESSOR AND CALIBRATOR ASSY, Powertrain Control Module - EEC-V - TYPE: ML1-442 - REPROGRAMMABLE F6TF 12A650-JD F6TZ 12A650-JD
SENSOR ASSY, Air Charge Temperature F5AF 12A697-AA F5AZ 12A697-A

Secondary Air Injection system consists of a belt-driven Air Pump, single or dual AIR Diverter valve(s), an AIR Bypass valve, and AIR Bypass solenoids, air silencer/filter, Powertrain Control Module and connecting wires and vacuum hoses. The Belt-Driven Secondary Air Injection system provides either upstream/bypass air or upstream/downstream/bypass air. The number of these system configurations vary significantly with AIR Bypass and AIR Diverter valve combinations (Figure 179).

1. The PCM requires ECT, IAT and rpm inputs to initiate Secondary Air Injection operation.
2. The PCM provides one or more signals that enable one or more AIR Bypass solenoids.
3. The AIR Bypass solenoids control one or more AIR Bypass valves and/or AIR Bypass Diverter Valves in order to route secondary air depending upon the specific configuration.
4. The belt-driven Air Pump is operational any time the engine is running.


Unburned fuel is probably the single biggest concern in vehicle emissions, not only because it's the most detrimental to the environment, but also because it's a waste of money. As engine management technology has progressed, a continually-increasing proportion of fuel is burned within the combustion chambers where it produces useable energy. Possibly the single biggest step in this direction is EFI, which results in MUCH more precise control of fuel flow, MUCH better atomization, and consequentially higher engine efficiency & reliability. Electronic engine management has also contributed significantly by instantly adjusting fuel delivery to the engine's exact state, and to the operator's needs. But overfuelling still occurs frequently (for several reasons), resulting in unacceptable HC emissions. The earliest attempt to reduce these emmissions was the addition of a device to "re-burn" the exhaust & consume this fuel (a "thermactor"). Engineers found that pure Platinum metal facilitated the reaction between fuel molecules & oxygen in the hot exhaust stream, without consuming the Platinum (meaning that it "catalyzes" the reaction). So powdered Platinum was mixed with ceramic clay & formed into honecomb-shaped tube extrusions to be incorporated in the exhaust system. Given its high surface area, the vast majority of the unburned fuel could be catalyzed before being emitted, but the Lead that was being added to gasoline as an anti-knock agent coated the Platinum, requiring UNleaded fuel to be produced. (The anti-knock agents in unleaded fuel are cheaper than Lead, but oil companies recognized the opportunity to gouge consumers & priced the new fuel accordingly.) But the high cost of Platinum & the expenses associated with developing the technology caused early designers to undersize catalytic converters, resulting in exhaust restrictions that noticeably reduced engine performance. Their initial solution was to add air to the exhaust (secondary air) using a belt-driven pump so that the fuel would burn more easily. But again; the system was too complicated & poorly designed for the typical mechanic to understand, so it was often neglected, modified, or sabotaged causing most people to think it was counterproductive or unnecessary. Over time, the cost of producing catalytic converters has come down, and the quality of their construction has gone up, making them very reliable & effective. So effective, in fact, that most now don't require the addition of downstream air. They have also been improved with additional catalyst chemicals that reduce CO & NOx emissions (3-way cats). Currently, the single biggest threat to a catalytic convertor/thermactor is probably mechanical damage. Collisions, road debris, improper service technique, & fording can shatter the delicate ceramic structure, causing exhaust restriction, noise, & increased emissions. But another significant threat is severe overfuelling (either because of fuel delivery or misfiring) which can overheat the ceramic substrate to the point that it powders & erodes. Modern engine management systems include dedicated downstream Oxygen sensors to monitor the catalysts' performance, but this performance generally has no impact on engine performance (exhaust restriction being the main exception).



The 2ndry air system is known to fail in a wide variety of ways. The check valves that prevent hot exhaust from entering the rubber hoses age, rust, leak, & crack open melting the plastic TAB & TAD valves, creating exhaust leaks that can damage other components, raising exhaust oxygen levels (setting lean codes or rich adaptive limit codes), and making rattling noises. The hard steel tubing between the exhaust & the check valve can rust or crack (especially the infamous "crossover tube" on the backs of V8 heads). The vacuum controls leak (including the "coffee can" reservoir on the R wheelwell), get misrouted during other repairs, or the diaphragms rupture. The electronics that control the vacuum controls can fail electrically or mechanically, or the wires can be damaged. But all of these failures are either A) relatively cheap & easy to repair, or B) cheap & easy to prevent with normal inspection & maintenance.

By Steve83
 

·
Urban Assault Bronco
Joined
·
1,280 Posts
cracked egr or a cracked exhaust manifold.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,549 Posts
6. gets louder in gear in neutral

hows it get louder in gear in neutral????


if it gets louder under load and quiets while coasting generally it sounds like a exhaust leak, but if you believe your exhaust is not leaking any place then second item on the list would be a main bearing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
648 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
hows it get louder in gear in neutral????


if it gets louder under load and quiets while coasting generally it sounds like a exhaust leak, but if you believe your exhaust is not leaking any place then second item on the list would be a main bearing.
oops, I meant to say that it is louder idling in gear than idling in neutral.

I'm going to take the rubber hose to the thermactor system in the back of the head today to see what I find.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
26,292 Posts
ok, I use a mirror & LED flashlight to shine on what I need to ck back there; be wary of Belts, fans, pulleys and hot engine; also shocks for coil/plug wires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
648 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
ok, I use a mirror & LED flashlight to shine on what I need to ck back there; be wary of Belts, fans, pulleys and hot engine; also shocks for coil/plug wires.
Thanks Miesk, best part of the efan conversion is that I don't get my fingernails knocked off anymore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
648 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Sounds like an exhaust leak, especially if its quieter idling in netural then gets louder when put in gear. Sometimes you can check it by pulling the spark plug wire to one cylinder at a time to cut the spark off. If the noise goes away then thats the cylinder thats causing the problem. However there is other types of noises, like a rod knock, that that will work to quiet down too so it doesn't guarantee its an exhaust leak, it just tells you which cylinder is causing it.
Well we have a winner. I pulled the #6 plug wire and the noise went away. I also shocked my testicles because I was leaning against the fender.

I'm going to repull the valve cover and check the # 6 rockers and pushrods. I pulled the #5 pushrods and only twisted the others to see if they were loose. This time I'll remove them and see if I see anything.

So, how bad is rod knock? Could it still be lifter tick?
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top