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You guys think this is too rough to clean up the seals for an intake manifold with this? It's really soft to the touch.

 

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on a cast iron manifold you should be ok as long as you don't lean into it
on aluminum, one split second too long and you are looking to get manifold resurfaced

whenever I clean a manifold surface, I always check after using fine sand paper on a long flat block of wood to make sure manifold is flat and true


are you running on a drill or die grinder?

I like the plastic disc with the little nubs on it, will not remove any metal
 

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I always use a good sharp scraper and then use a piece of emory cloth by hand to get tough stuff and scuff the surface a little. If you use that your probly gunna round off the edges and you wont have a good square surface like you need and could get leaks
 

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I avoid using abrasives on gasket surfaces if possible. The discs tr mentioned, a good scraper, or even a fine-bristle wire wheel (on iron) would be better.

Permatex gasket remover will really help soften them up if they are baked on there.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
on a cast iron manifold you should be ok as long as you don't lean into it

on aluminum, one split second too long and you are looking to get manifold resurfaced



whenever I clean a manifold surface, I always check after using fine sand paper on a long flat block of wood to make sure manifold is flat and true





are you running on a drill or die grinder?



I like the plastic disc with the little nubs on it, will not remove any metal

I cannot find the plastic disk anywhere! Where do you get them. And I had it on a drill since my die grinder has something else on it at the moment lol
 

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Did you go to Napa like I suggested in your other thread? I even gave you s part number.
 

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This is what you need. Both Advance and Oreilly should have them in their paint/bodywork section. Its a pad that your drill can use that has new scotch brite pads that screw into it
 

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This is what you need. Both Advance and Oreilly should have them in their paint/bodywork section. Its a pad that your drill can use that has new scotch brite pads that screw into it
Is that what everyone uses? Ive been using wire wheels on a die grinder for that kind of stuff. :brownbag
I've rebuilt tons of small engines and prepped lots of sealing surfaces with a large wire wheel and die grinder (the small wheels will take chunks out) and I've yet to have any sealing issues. Except on my timing cover (which I only scraped) and my thermostat housing (which is warped and corroded).
I tried a nylon brush once but it wouldn't take the old gasket off.
That being said I would never use any kind of sanding wheel for preparing a sealing surface. I use those on a grinder and they will easily take out nice chunks of metal, and I'm not talking about just aluminum either.
 

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I've personally only used wire wheels for removing large amounts of crap. Maybe I'm just paranoid :shrug That being said I so use the more aggressive scotch brite pads but go over it one last time with a fine one

I also dont have the luxury of air tools so I went for what was easiest to use on my drill
 

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I've personally only used wire wheels for removing large amounts of crap. Maybe I'm just paranoid :shrug That being said I so use the more aggressive scotch brite pads but go over it one last time with a fine one

I also dont have the luxury of air tools so I went for what was easiest to use on my drill
I may try a nylon brush again but I'm not counting on it working. Your making me paranoid now.
I just put a whole engine together using a wire wheel to clean everything , no leaks. It's definately something you need to have a feel for. I could easily see someone slapping a wire wheel on and ruining something because they used the wrong one.
 

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Some dumbass at ace convinced me to get one of these but its made of like rubber. Most useless thing I've ever used. Can't even clean off dirt
 

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Flapper wheels remove metal for sure, any engine, pump turbine etc that ive rebuilt its scraper, scotch brite and stone used to clean up machined surfaces. flapper wheel removes metal, and wire wheel roughs up surface,but the gaskets are thick enough on these engines as well as low enough pressure u can get away with using wire wheel as long as down pressure is light but its not the best way to go
 

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Some dumbass at ace convinced me to get one of these but its made of like rubber. Most useless thing I've ever used. Can't even clean off dirt
I tried basically the same thing but smaller and for a die grinder.


I hate using a scraper. I always end up spending a ton of time trying to get the old gasket off and there's still bits left over.
Last time I did the timing cover gasket was around 5 years ago and I just scraped as much gasket off as I could. Now that there isn't any sludge in there it's leaking. Looking back at the pictures it's clear that there was stubborn junk on the sealing surface keeping it from sealing properly.
 

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I like using brass wire wheels and cup brushes for machined surfaces, they don't remove the base metal like a steel brush will but they remove crud just fine.
 
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