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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im going to be doing a fluid change for my tranny and hopefully my TC. I read the tech article about how to go about this, but my question is when i drain the TC, its completely empty, no fluid in it. so when i put some new fluid into the tranny and start the truck and let it idle like the tech article says, wont the Torque converter be spinning with no fluid in it when i first start it and let it idle? since it takes time for fluid to get pumped back into it....
 

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Howdy howdy howdy!
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Yes, but you will be just fine man. If you drained all the fluid, put new fluid in with the engine off, fired up your rig and tried driving off right away then you could damage something. If you follow all the proper directions then you will be just fine.

Remember to cycle through the gears after you put the new fluid in then with the truck idling in park or neutral check the fluid level. If its correct then go for a short drive around your "hood" and check the level again.

While you're at it, why not consider adding an external cooler, fluid filter and possibly a shift kit? Now's the right time if you are considering any of those.
 

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Roller rockers are gay
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i agree with what timmy said, except that these trucks need the trans fluid level checked with the engine running/transmission in PARK. Neutral will give you a false reading.

also, look up the spec for a full fluid change including dropping the pan and draining the converter. i always like to just fill it most of the way up before starting it so the trans isn't starved for fluid at all when you first start it.

and that dipstick tube is long, it's going to take a long time for the fluid to drain down, so you will get bogus readings due to the fluid still draining down the sides of the filler tube. thats another reason why i look up the spec and dump most of the ATF in before i do my final top off and fluid check. saves a lot of time.
 

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"While you're at it, why not consider adding an external cooler, fluid filter and possibly a shift kit? Now's the right time if you are considering any of those."

liltimmy08
Can you explain Shift Kit? Sorry still a transmission newb here.

Thanks,

Glayd
 

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yo,

as liltimmy08 advised;

Fluid & Filter Change in a 96 from 1996 All F-Series and Bronco with E4OD Automatic Transmission Workshop Manual
Loosen, then remove the transmission fluid pan attaching bolts to drain fluid.

CAUTION: Cork gaskets and elastomeric gaskets are not interchangeable. If you remove a cork gasket, replace it with a cork gasket. If you remove an elastomeric gasket, clean, inspect and reuse unless gasket is damaged. Be careful not to cut or bend elastomeric gasket.

Remove transmission pan gasket. If transmission is equipped with a cork gasket, discard it. If transmission is equipped with the new elastomeric reusable gasket, clean, inspect and reuse unless damaged.

Old Style Transmission Pan and Cork Transmission Pan Gasket
see diagram dd0610a

New Style Transmission Pan and Elastomeric Pan Gasket
see diagram dd0611a

Perform required internal repair and cleaning.

Drain the torque converter by removing drain plug.

Thoroughly flush torque converter (7902), cooler lines and transmission in-tank radiator cooler and auxiliary cooler (if equipped).

After torque converter has been drained, install new torque converter drain plug and tighten to 24-27 Nm (18-20 lb-ft).

CAUTION: Mixing 4x4 and 4x2 transmission fluid filters and transmission pan assembly components could cause transmission damage.

Select the appropriate style filter assembly and transmission pan for either 4x2 or 4x4 models.
see d16541a

Replace fluid filter and seal assembly.
CAUTION: Cork gaskets and elastomeric gaskets are not interchangeable. If you remove a cork gasket, replace it with a cork gasket. If you remove an elastomeric gasket, clean, inspect and reuse unless gasket is damaged. Be careful not to cut or bend elastomeric gasket.

NOTE: A unique transmission pan and pan retaining bolts are required to use the new elastomeric gasket for past model service. The cork style gasket will be retained for past model service where a new transmission pan is not required. If the transmission pan is damaged and requires replacement, a kit will be available. This kit will contain a transmission pan, elastomeric gasket and 20 pan bolts having an increased thread length to accommodate current and past model usage.
If transmission is equipped with a cork gasket, discard it and install a new gasket. If transmission is equipped with the new elastomeric reusable gasket, clean, inspect and reuse unless damaged.
Install cleaned pan, gasket and bolts. Tighten bolts to 14-16 Nm (10-12 lb-ft).
CAUTION: Use only MERCON® service fluid as the use of any other fluids may result in a transmission malfunction or failure.

Add 6.2 liters (6.5 quarts) of MERCON® service fluid to the transmission through the fluid filler tube.

Start engine. Move the transmission range selector lever through all gear ranges, checking for engagements.

Check and adjust the transmission fluid level in 0.24 liter (0.5-pint) increments to the proper level (cross-hatched area of the fluid level indicator (7A020) at normal operating temperatures)..."
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Fluid Level Check in a 96; Following is from my 96's Owner's Guide; same as your year; It is preferable to check the transmission fluid level at normal operating temperature 150°F-170°F (66°C-77°C), after approximately 20 miles (32 km) of driving. However, if necessary, you can check the fluid level without having to drive 20 miles (32 km) to obtain a normal operating temperature if outside temperatures are above 50°F (10°C). NOTE: If the vehicle has been operated for an extended period at high speeds or in city traffic during hot weather, or pulling a trailer, the vehicle should be turned off for about 30 minutes to allow the fluid to cool before checking. With the vehicle on a level surface, start the engine and move the transmission shift selector through all of the gear ranges allowing sufficient time for each position to engage. Securely latch the transmission shift selector in the Park (P) position, fully set the parking brake and leave the engine running. NOTE: Vehicles equipped with the 4x4 option must have the 4x4 shift selector in any position other than neutral. WARNING Your vehicle should not be driven if the fluid level is below the bottom hole on the dipstick and outside temperatures are above 50°F (10°C).Wipe off the dipstick cap, pull the dipstick out and wipe the indicator end clean. Put the dipstick back into the filler tube and make sure it is fully seated. Pull the dipstick out and read the fluid level. When checking fluid at normal operating temperature, the fluid level should be within the crosshatched area on the dipstick. When the vehicle has not been driven, and outside temperature is above 50°F (10°C), the fluid level should be between the holes on the dipstick. Adding Automatic Transmission Fluid The fluid type is stamped on the dipstick. Before adding any fluid, be sure that the correct type will be used. Add fluid in 1/2 pint (.25L) increments through the filler tube to bring the level to the correct area on the dipstick. If an overfill occurs, excess fluid should be removed.
Source: by miesk5 at http://www.fullsizebronco.com/forum/showthread.php?t=187567

Fluid Change Interval (scroll); "...For 1995, Ford Motor Company has reduced the mileage interval of automatic transmission fluid changes to 30,000 miles. This applies to all transmissions except the E40D transmission used in Ford trucks. The E40D change interval is 15,000 miles. Ford engineers stated that the intervals were reduced due to fluid degradation especially in humid climates. As you all know, the above-mentioned service intervals are for "normal driving" conditions, severe duty conditions (fleet, city driving, short trips, dusty conditions, hilly areas, towing, snowplowing) require more frequent service. Always change the transmission filter when you change the fluid..." MIESK5 NOTE; fluids should be changed every 21,000 MILES using Ford's Severe Duty Schedule if Towing a trailer or carrying a heavy load. Operating in severe dust conditions. Extensive idling, such as police, taxi or door-to-door delivery service. Snowplowing, Off-Road operation. Short trips of less than 10 miles (16 km) when outside temperatures remain below 0°F (-18°C)
Source: by Bruce R at atp-inc.com

Fluid & Filter and Ford Pan w/Drain Plug Change and Filter Clip pics in a 94
Source: by sewiv (Sandy); Sandywrote;" usually put in a full case (12 quarts) (assuming I drained the torque converter), then start the engine. Don't rev it up, just let it idle for a minute or two. Check the pan gasket (and the external filter, if you have one) for leaks while it's idling. Then, with your foot on the brake (and the parking brake on and the wheels chocked), shift into each gear for about 20 seconds, and back to neutral. Check the level of the trans fluid (with the engine running, in neutral), and add enough to bring it up to the bottom hole on the dipstick. (edit: The crosshatched area on the dipstick is only 1 pint (1/2 bottle) "high". Don't over-fill.) If you have to add more than a quart, go through the gears again. You'll be able to tell when you are getting enough fluid in there, because you'll be able to feel the transmission actually shift into gear when you move the selector.

After you are getting solid gear engagement, and the level is at least at the lowest hole on the dipstick, drive around gently for about 15 minutes, to get the tranny up to temperature. (Don't forget about your wheel chocks.) If you feel any slippage, stop and add some fluid. Don't add more than half a pint (a quarter of a bottle) at a time. Once it's warmed up, make sure that the fluid level is showing in the crosshatches on the dipstick..." http://fullsizebronco.com/forum/showthread.php?t=130945
 

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Howdy howdy howdy!
Joined
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5,513 Posts
"While you're at it, why not consider adding an external cooler, fluid filter and possibly a shift kit? Now's the right time if you are considering any of those."

liltimmy08
Can you explain Shift Kit? Sorry still a transmission newb here.

Thanks,

Glayd
The E4OD's have mushy shifts from the factory for comfort. This causes the gears to pretty much "slip" while shifting. A tranny with a shift kit eliminates all that with a few mods to the valve body and fluid passages. You get much quicker, firmer shifts with a shift kit. Also a longer tranny life.

Both my rigs have beefy kits that (depending on amount of throttle) will chirp the tires going into 2nd gear.
 

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The E4OD's have mushy shifts from the factory for comfort. This causes the gears to pretty much "slip" while shifting. A tranny with a shift kit eliminates all that with a few mods to the valve body and fluid passages. You get much quicker, firmer shifts with a shift kit. Also a longer tranny life.

Both my rigs have beefy kits that (depending on amount of throttle) will chirp the tires going into 2nd gear.
I have heard that before. I was wondering if they were right. Your the 4th person I have heard that from. Hell, mine "AOD", shifts smooth, but very fast through the gears. Like it is anxious to get into OD. :histerica
 

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MARBLE GARGLER!
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Get a valve body from Punisher in the vendor section, My E40D ROCKS now ! No mushy shifts. And when i floor it....it shifts real firm ! Single best investment for an E40D {get a huge trans cooler too-}
 

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how many miles are on your tranny? i have a ton on my e4od over 200,000 never had a problem yet.. would it be a bad idea to install shift kit??????? the tranny shifts great and doesnt seem to have any issues.
 

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Only when you replace your TC do you need to worry about fluid being in there as it is common procedure to dump @ least a quart of fluid in the TC before install/start-up. This is because the TC is totally dry from the factory. Yours @ least has a resin of fluid that's not going to drain out 'til the pump picks up suction and fills it to proper level.

Thin Blue Line: I purchased a valve body kit for my '91 AOD that I put in my '79 lariat. It's made by Gil Younger and improved shift quality immensely. I mention this as the AOD had almost 200,000 miles on it and I know they offer kits for e40d's as well. The pump is getting weak now (imagine that) but the shifts are still much firmer than they used to be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yes, but you will be just fine man. If you drained all the fluid, put new fluid in with the engine off, fired up your rig and tried driving off right away then you could damage something. If you follow all the proper directions then you will be just fine.

Remember to cycle through the gears after you put the new fluid in then with the truck idling in park or neutral check the fluid level. If its correct then go for a short drive around your "hood" and check the level again.

While you're at it, why not consider adding an external cooler, fluid filter and possibly a shift kit? Now's the right time if you are considering any of those.
i agree with what timmy said, except that these trucks need the trans fluid level checked with the engine running/transmission in PARK. Neutral will give you a false reading.

also, look up the spec for a full fluid change including dropping the pan and draining the converter. i always like to just fill it most of the way up before starting it so the trans isn't starved for fluid at all when you first start it.

and that dipstick tube is long, it's going to take a long time for the fluid to drain down, so you will get bogus readings due to the fluid still draining down the sides of the filler tube. thats another reason why i look up the spec and dump most of the ATF in before i do my final top off and fluid check. saves a lot of time.
Only when you replace your TC do you need to worry about fluid being in there as it is common procedure to dump @ least a quart of fluid in the TC before install/start-up. This is because the TC is totally dry from the factory. Yours @ least has a resin of fluid that's not going to drain out 'til the pump picks up suction and fills it to proper level.

Thin Blue Line: I purchased a valve body kit for my '91 AOD that I put in my '79 lariat. It's made by Gil Younger and improved shift quality immensely. I mention this as the AOD had almost 200,000 miles on it and I know they offer kits for e40d's as well. The pump is getting weak now (imagine that) but the shifts are still much firmer than they used to be.
Thank you everybody for the replies, it makes sense now, atleast now i know t wont hurt my tranny, so i will follow the Hot to article to the T. Thanks again :thumbup
 
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