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Discussion Starter #1
My tranny died on Sunday the 2nd of may. Its my DD so i am in a hurry to fix with limited funds. And no Tranny knowledge. I have a 94 w/ 351 E40D tranny.
I found a tranny on craigslist for 500 bucks OBO. It came out of a 91 F350 dualie. Owner said the F350 has a 460 motor. Will this match up to the BKO?

thanks for any help guys!!!
 

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Satyr of the Midwest
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No. BBF pattern is different. You need an E4OD from a 5.0L or 5.8L (not sure if they came with 4.9L engines, but theirs are the same as well). If speed & reliability are the main concerns, which it sounds like in your situation, I'd look for a Motorcraft-rebuilt transmission, second choice being a Jasper.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
damn!
I guess I should explain what it is doing first.
A week before I had the first problem. After it was parked for 5 min it would not go into gear. I shifted it back and forth a couple of times and it worked again. Then this saturday it started slipping from takeoff. So I got home and parked it. Sunday I tried to drive it to see what would happen. It would do nothing at all. Tues when I got home I tried again. It went into gear so i went around the block within 1/4 mile started to slip again. I had to push back into driveway. Any ideas?
 

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Satyr of the Midwest
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Any ideas?
It's hard to make a diagnosis from here :toothless but if the fluid level and condition check out all right, and it's not something stupid like the filter fell out of its bore or a misbehaving MLPS, it might be something more extensive and/or internal. On that last point, does shifting into manual 1st or 2nd make a difference? I would probably pull codes to make certain it wasn't an electrical issue like a solenoid failure.

Be sure the torque converter is replaced as well, since it does have a friction element inside that wears out.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
fluids are worn but at the right level. i read on here that the filter falling out would cause the truck to stall in reverse. What does the MLPS do?
Shifting to 1st or 2nd makes no differance
I will pull codes tonight hopefully.
When or if i change tranny i will put a torque converter as i was told you should.

But chances are she needs a rebuild or replacement. I have 198000 miles and doubt the Previous owner did anything to her.
 

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Satyr of the Midwest
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MLPS == Manual Lever Position Sensor. Tells the PCM which gear the driver is demanding.

Sometimes when they fail, the driver will experience a "neutral slip" while driving under high-torque loads; then it will slam back into gear once engine speed is reduced and torque is diminished. It's like a big-ass throttle position sensor, i.e. a potentiometer, and just indicates where the shift lever is with a voltage signal. If it's out of the intended range, then another gear position such as neutral or reverse is interpreted by the PCM.
 

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Satyr of the Midwest
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Driver's side of the transmission. Look near the place the shift cable meets the shift lever on the transmission. Basically, fall out of your truck and on your back, then crawl a little underneath and look up.

Looks like this:

 

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Satyr of the Midwest
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and also



Test with a volt meter between the "Transmission Range Sensor" and "EEC pin 46 SIG-RTN" lines.
 

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Satyr of the Midwest
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Did the original test bad?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
SIGEPBLUE no i didn't test it. But I felt based on the symptoms that it was the culprit. After rewiring the plug and installing the new MLPS I stll have the same problem. Won't go into reverse at all. And will go into drive of and on. Could it be as simple as the torque converter?
 

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Satyr of the Midwest
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Pretty doubtful. Whenever I've seen torque converter failure, it's either been a spline stripping out (which makes a helluva grinding noise), or the converter clutch going bad (which results in shuddering and overheating). They just don't fail in a manner to make a vehicle go into gear and then sometimes not.

Assuming the MLPS is not at fault, your next diagnostic step should be pulling codes. Click here to see how, post them here, and be sure you get only the engine OFF codes (don't need the engine running codes here). This will tell us whether the PCM sees an electrical problem or something out of range.
 

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Satyr of the Midwest
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112 means the ACT sensor circuit has fallen out of range (below 0.2V).

172 indicates a lean condition during closed-loop operation.

It's very hard to tell, given the distance, whether this is a mechanical or electrical issue. I wish I could do a few more tests for ya to verify one or the other.

I'm looking at the possible scenarios like this:

If it's electrical, it's possible to have the PCM not commanding the transmission to go into gear (with everything still checking OK by its self-tests), basically 'doing what its told,' which is why I suggested testing the MLPS. The MLP signal is the only input the PCM has regarding which gear the driver is demanding.

Another possible electrical issues would be a loose or corroded connection somewhere between the PCM and the solenoid pack connector on the transmission; the connector on the transmission is notorious for causing shift problems after going through extremely high water or mud. Usually it can be fixed by cleaning the area around the connector, disconnecting it, thoroughly cleaning the pins with an electrical contact cleaner, and then applying a high-quality silicone water-proofing grease made for electrical connectors before reassembly.

Yet another possibility would be that the solenoid pack is defective somehow, either through a shift solenoid failure (itself either electrically or mechanically faulty), or an EPC (line pressure/variable force solenoid) failure. At this point of diagnostics, the home mechanic must be creative in diagnosis. You can measure the solenoids' resistances, and verify them against this chart:



Refer to the EPC, SS1, SS2, and TCC values, and the TFT (same as TOT, compare to current fluid temperature) graph in the mid-section. The easiest place to measure these resistances is NOT at the transmission, but at the connector(s) located on the driver's side fender liner, just below the power brake booster. You may have to use some brake parts cleaner to get the wires cleaned up enough to distinguish the colors to find the right wires, but that's the best location IME to measure voltage and/or resistance.

If the resistances all check out, I'd be left with an inclination toward a mechanical problem like a burned clutch pack or failed front pump (or associated components). I don't have the Ford Technical Service CD with me ATM, but I'm sure their diagnostic procedure will help beyond this point.

Let me do some digging. . . .
 
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