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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a chance to by a 1975 ford 3/4 ton 4x4 for 800 bucks, probably offer him less after I look at the truck. The guy says it has a 44 in the front and a 60 in the back. After searching this forum, I think this is a low pinion 44 with drum brakes. I have not looked at the truck yet but has anyone used this year of 44 for a sas swap? I do realize I would have to convert the drums to disc. I hope to part the rest of the truck out and make some of my money back. I blew another u-joint in my front ttb and I am looking to put in a solid front axle.
 

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I would look at it to make sure the axle hasn't been swapped out but I am pretty sure that it will be low pinion and closed knuckle. Both of those are undesired. What are your other plans for the swap. Coils, Leafs, Locked, unlocked, Tire size? We can help you better this way. But I would look at the axle to make sure but I dont think you will wont that axle.

Read up on this website it will help. I'm doing this now
Mr. N's link
 

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You would honestly be going backwards with that swap. The low pinion makes the gears considerably weaker than your current high-pinion set up.

The u-joints in the solid D44 are the same as what's in the TTB....which one do you keep breaking?

In all honesty, a D44 SAS is not worth doing if you are looking to bump up in strength; all you will really gain is flex, and you won't even get that if you don't go with better-than-stock arms...

My recommendation to you is to unlock the front axle and drive easier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I would look at it to make sure the axle hasn't been swapped out but I am pretty sure that it will be low pinion and closed knuckle. Both of those are undesired. What are your other plans for the swap. Coils, Leafs, Locked, unlocked, Tire size? We can help you better this way. But I would look at the axle to make sure but I dont think you will wont that axle.

Read up on this website it will help. I'm doing this now
Mr. N's link
Thanks, I have a detroit tru trac now with 456 gears running 35" swampers. I would like the same setup but with a solid axle. I agree, after gathering more info this does not sound like a good donar vehicle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You would honestly be going backwards with that swap. The low pinion makes the gears considerably weaker than your current high-pinion set up.

The u-joints in the solid D44 are the same as what's in the TTB....which one do you keep breaking?

In all honesty, a D44 SAS is not worth doing if you are looking to bump up in strength; all you will really gain is flex, and you won't even get that if you don't go with better-than-stock arms...

My recommendation to you is to unlock the front axle and drive easier.
I would run cage arms or somethnig other then stock. I have broke the outer stub joint twice. I did run it pretty hard the last time.
 

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Thanks, I have a detroit tru trac now with 456 gears running 35" swampers. I would like the same setup but with a solid axle. I agree, after gathering more info this does not sound like a good donar vehicle.
Very nice. We will have pretty much the same setup when it's all done. I got mt 44 this weekend and can't wait to get it under my bronco. Are your going to try and stick with 5 lug or go 8. Just wondering why you were looking at a leaf setup 44 if your going to be running cage or duff arms?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Very nice. We will have pretty much the same setup when it's all done. I got mt 44 this weekend and can't wait to get it under my bronco. Are your going to try and stick with 5 lug or go 8. Just wondering why you were looking at a leaf setup 44 if your going to be running cage or duff arms?
I was not sure if I could convert it or make it work. I would have been a good deal on an old truck. I am obviously a little green when it comes to axle identification. I am hoping to find an old truck with a good donor axle then part the truck out. I can do all of the work myself just need to find the correct Dana 44 to swap in.
 

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I have a chance to by a 1975 ford 3/4 ton 4x4 for 800 bucks, probably offer him less after I look at the truck. The guy says it has a 44 in the front and a 60 in the back. After searching this forum, I think this is a low pinion 44 with drum brakes. I have not looked at the truck yet but has anyone used this year of 44 for a sas swap? I do realize I would have to convert the drums to disc. I hope to part the rest of the truck out and make some of my money back. I blew another u-joint in my front ttb and I am looking to put in a solid front axle.
For $800 I'd pass. The front should be 8 lug but low pinion and possibly drum brake. You can find F250 stuff (usually you'd shoot for 78-79) that will be HP, disc, 8 lug. You could even just get ANY 76-79 HP D44 axle and then find yourself an 8 lug knuckles out setup (including chevy like I did...my axle is actually just a 78-79 ford HP 1/2ton)...in any case about $300 for the front with 8 lug, and another $100 for your basic D60 fullfloat. With your rear though, I'll bet it's 16 spline, not 30 so you'd even need new shafts and a 30 spline carrier. I think ford switched to 30 spline after the '75 year, but not positive on that.


You would honestly be going backwards with that swap. The low pinion makes the gears considerably weaker than your current high-pinion set up.

The u-joints in the solid D44 are the same as what's in the TTB....which one do you keep breaking?

In all honesty, a D44 SAS is not worth doing if you are looking to bump up in strength; all you will really gain is flex, and you won't even get that if you don't go with better-than-stock arms...

My recommendation to you is to unlock the front axle and drive easier.
I'd disagree. You would have a solid axle under the truck instead of a stamped steel front axle. You'd have 2 joints to break, not 3. You also have the option to 8 lug (though you can also do this with TTB if you really wanted to shine up your wet noodle). and lastly you have options....alloy shafts and joints that admittedly can cost you some $$, but give you a stronger setup overall than what you could possibly do with the TTB.

you did already cover the articulation advantage.;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
For $800 I'd pass. The front should be 8 lug but low pinion and possibly drum brake. You can find F250 stuff (usually you'd shoot for 78-79) that will be HP, disc, 8 lug. You could even just get ANY 76-79 HP D44 axle and then find yourself an 8 lug knuckles out setup (including chevy like I did...my axle is actually just a 78-79 ford HP 1/2ton)...in any case about $300 for the front with 8 lug, and another $100 for your basic D60 fullfloat. With your rear though, I'll bet it's 16 spline, not 30 so you'd even need new shafts and a 30 spline carrier. I think ford switched to 30 spline after the '75 year, but not positive on that.




I'd disagree. You would have a solid axle under the truck instead of a stamped steel front axle. You'd have 2 joints to break, not 3. You also have the option to 8 lug (though you can also do this with TTB if you really wanted to shine up your wet noodle). and lastly you have options....alloy shafts and joints that admittedly can cost you some $$, but give you a stronger setup overall than what you could possibly do with the TTB.

you did already cover the articulation advantage.;)
Thanks for the info shadofax. I was going to offer the guy 500 for the truck but only if it had a decent axle in the front to swap. To me it is a no brainer, I would much rather have a solid front 44 then the ttb. Like you said there are more joints to break in the ttb, articulation issues, also they never seem to stay aligned 100% when lifted. Maybe I will find a Dana 60 for the front and a 10.25 full float for the rear. I will keep looking, something will turn up!
 

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I'd disagree. You would have a solid axle under the truck instead of a stamped steel front axle. You'd have 2 joints to break, not 3. You also have the option to 8 lug (though you can also do this with TTB if you really wanted to shine up your wet noodle). and lastly you have options....alloy shafts and joints that admittedly can cost you some $$, but give you a stronger setup overall than what you could possibly do with the TTB.

you did already cover the articulation advantage.;)
true, but he isn't breaking the housing (and, honestly, who really breaks a TTB housing?) or the stub shaft, he's breaking the U-joint that's exactly the same axle to axle. A D50 stub shaft basically eliminates the problem of the third joint, and can be done for almost free; IMO, the extra U-joint is not reason enough to swap.

Don't get me wrong, I'm a big fan of the D44 SAS when done for the right reasons. Thinking that you are going to gain strength just because you've traded a split D44 for a solid one isn't a good enough reason in my book. However, I think that the extra articulation would help with keeping the axle together in the event that both the TTB and the solid are locked simply because there would be fewer instances of one tire carrying all the weight (fewer tire "lifts"). I don't heavily figure alloy shafts into the equation; IME they are just as apt to break in extreme situations as regular old shafts. They seem to just be good insurance that you don't break a shaft doing something silly, and seem to be a little more resistant to ear warpage; there are just some things that you shouldn't do to a D44. In the end, it all boils down to driving style/ability.

It sounds to me like the fella prefers the driving characteristics of the solid axle to the TTB. Good enough reason for me to do the swap.

and I mean all of this to be light hearted; I'm not trying to be a prick to anyone :beer
 

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true, but he isn't breaking the housing (and, honestly, who really breaks a TTB housing?) or the stub shaft, he's breaking the U-joint that's exactly the same axle to axle. A D50 stub shaft basically eliminates the problem of the third joint, and can be done for almost free; IMO, the extra U-joint is not reason enough to swap.

Don't get me wrong, I'm a big fan of the D44 SAS when done for the right reasons. Thinking that you are going to gain strength just because you've traded a split D44 for a solid one isn't a good enough reason in my book. However, I think that the extra articulation would help with keeping the axle together in the event that both the TTB and the solid are locked simply because there would be fewer instances of one tire carrying all the weight (fewer tire "lifts"). I don't heavily figure alloy shafts into the equation; IME they are just as apt to break in extreme situations as regular old shafts. They seem to just be good insurance that you don't break a shaft doing something silly, and seem to be a little more resistant to ear warpage; there are just some things that you shouldn't do to a D44. In the end, it all boils down to driving style/ability.
It sounds to me like the fella prefers the driving characteristics of the solid axle to the TTB. Good enough reason for me to do the swap.

and I mean all of this to be light hearted; I'm not trying to be a prick to anyone :beer
The housing actually does get tweaked quite often, which is why I believe so many complain of some common symptons such as unusual tire wear, trouble with ball joints, bushings going bad quickly, etc. I do believe it's decent and would rather have the ford TTB over an IFS A-ARM.

Alloy shafts and joints, well, the thread poster mentioned breaking joints and he likely would not nearly have the issue with alloy stuff, period. No one can stop super hard wheeling. If that's the issue, just being foot down abusive as the answer to every offroad challenge, then that person needs a major rollcage and very big axles (which will just ratchet up the action anyway, so why not figure out how to wheel what you have without much, if any breakage?)

understood you are not trying to start something. you have valid points for discussion.

Just from a D44 standpoint, you should get some alloy shafts and good alloy joints in your hands, and you'd see there are obvious strength advantages at the weak points of the 44....unfortunately not available to the ttb crowd without major expense and effort. the D50 inner is a nice (and best) upgrade IMO. make sure you have some nice spicer 760x outers and maybe even buy the JBG outer alloy (not 4340 I don't think) shafts and hey, you've done what you can for the TTB.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
true, but he isn't breaking the housing (and, honestly, who really breaks a TTB housing?) or the stub shaft, he's breaking the U-joint that's exactly the same axle to axle. A D50 stub shaft basically eliminates the problem of the third joint, and can be done for almost free; IMO, the extra U-joint is not reason enough to swap.

Don't get me wrong, I'm a big fan of the D44 SAS when done for the right reasons. Thinking that you are going to gain strength just because you've traded a split D44 for a solid one isn't a good enough reason in my book. However, I think that the extra articulation would help with keeping the axle together in the event that both the TTB and the solid are locked simply because there would be fewer instances of one tire carrying all the weight (fewer tire "lifts"). I don't heavily figure alloy shafts into the equation; IME they are just as apt to break in extreme situations as regular old shafts. They seem to just be good insurance that you don't break a shaft doing something silly, and seem to be a little more resistant to ear warpage; there are just some things that you shouldn't do to a D44. In the end, it all boils down to driving style/ability.

It sounds to me like the fella prefers the driving characteristics of the solid axle to the TTB. Good enough reason for me to do the swap.

and I mean all of this to be light hearted; I'm not trying to be a prick to anyone :beer
You hit the nail on the head. I prefer a solid axle. I do not wheel too hard and have lots of years of off road experience. Besides my 5.8 is basically stock so it’s not like I have lots of power anyway. I have owned several vehicles over the years, and several with solid axles. I have always planned on putting different axles under my bronco. I know my larger tires and Detroit tru trac do put extra strain on the ttb. I think I will do the 50 stub shaft upgrade while I keep searching for my solid axle donor. Thanks for your feedback also, I appreciate it. :thumbup
 

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I had one of those closed nuck D44's on my 68 Dodge. It sucked, low pinion... drum brakes... pretty much useless for anything heavy, IMHO I've also heard that they have weak tubes.
 
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