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The Anti Yam!
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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone else's steering stabilizers do this?


It doesn't really seem to be adding any slack to the system, but it may be minimizing the stabilizers ability to minimize bump steer.

Would you agree?

The bracket doesn't seem to rotate nearly as much without the stabilizers.


For those with this style stabilizer, look and see if yours do the same thing.

Does the other style twin setup twist the drag link/inner TRE when the steering is cycled?

(And yes, I repainted them before reinstalling them:toothless)
 

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Its twisting up and down with the stabilizers mounted because of the resistance in the absorber. Its easier to twist up or down than to compress or extend the shocks. So that happens first then the shocks move in or out.
 

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The Anti Yam!
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22,680 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Its twisting up and down with the stabilizers mounted because of the resistance in the absorber. Its easier to twist up or down than to compress or extend the shocks. So that happens first then the shocks move in or out.
I understand, but is this negatively affecting anything?

I cant see what is happening
Why?
 

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Premium Member
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Its twisting up and down with the stabilizers mounted because of the resistance in the absorber. Its easier to twist up or down than to compress or extend the shocks. So that happens first then the shocks move in or out.
Same thing happens with my Drag Link as I believe the tie rod ends are designed to have a limited amount of axial flex. My tie rods are good and the steering is great.


Yes, because you are trans mitting the road shock through your steering box. The saying goes "Stop the force at the sorce" Translated you want to stop the movement as close to the wheel as possible.
When non-stabilized, the drag link incurs a direct compressive load. The stabilizers create an artificial axial load and shock buffer. I believe that a single stabilizer is recommended for 33" tires, at least with an OEM style drag link.
 

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Former owner of Shadofax
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Yes, because you are trans mitting the road shock through your steering box. The saying goes "Stop the force at the sorce" Translated you want to stop the movement as close to the wheel as possible.

That's exactly why I wanted to move away from the stabilizer in this location (it's mounted down from tie rod to solid axle). This also allowed me to get away from the stud/stud mounting which is what is allowing this (the eye to eye mounts would not allow this kind of movement.
 

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Former owner of Shadofax
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English please. (Dumb it down for us simple folk):toothless
That's exactly why I wanted to move away from the stabilizer in this location (it's mounted down from tie rod to solid axle). So I moved my single stabilizer location from just like yours down to the source (wheels/tires)...the axle/tie rod are as close as I can get here.


This also allowed me to get away from the stud/stud mounting which is what is allowing this (the eye to eye mounts would not allow this kind of movement. If you disconnect one end of your stabilzer, just "roll it around". A stud mount allows for 360* as far as the bushing will allow before binding. This is needed with your frame to drag link setup since these two mounting points are not moving together (like an axle/tie rod mount does). The eye mount won't allow this and so the stabilizer can't act like this.
 
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