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Discussion Starter #1
Is anyone running caps here as opposed to Ubolts?

Just replaced my rear axel yoke and u joint and used new U bolts to hold the u joint to the yoke. It looks like the cap and bolt would do a better job at this because they seem beefier and have the extra nub on the outside to keep the cap from wandering out. Also seems like the caps here would prevent the flat side of the flange from getting banged up by dirt/rocks/debris.

When I painted the yoke before going in, I left the flat side that goes toward the ujoint unpainted, thinking caps would go there (not thinking through completely, i know...) and mate up to this. Now I'm thinking I need to do one of the following:
*run caps as opposed to U bolts
*touch up paint it in place so it don't rust
*rub some grease or something on it so it don't rust.

Anyone got a link to the caps? What are the pros/cons of using caps here? When I say caps, I mean the cast caps with bolts that are used on the CV joint end.

Associated U bolt question: If caps are no good here, which way do the U bolts go? or does it matter? When looking at the U bolts closely, it appears that they are slightly formed to one side. I put that side to the inside of the Ujoint cap. The bend appears to be very slight but it was there on all the U bolts I've seen so far.

AND the Spicer Life non greasable units are MUCH better quality machining than the other crap at the local auto shops. I'm hoping not to change any more for a long time...

Thanks! have a great week!
 

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Chromo says:

Which yoke are you working on, and what size joint are you using?

Yokes are designed to use either a "strap" style, or "u-bolt" style u-joint retainer.



Or



Each yoke is designed for one, or the other. The yokes designed for a u-bolt will not be threaded in the holes, and a hex nut is required to apply the clamping force.
Yokes intended for straps will have threads in the holes designed to accept the bolts that are used to clamp the strap to the yoke.

If you are asking about a girdle, these are aftermarket, and may not offer the clearance needed for smaller u-joints, and might limit the angle in which the driveshaft can move.

These caps that you speak of, might be the retainers for a double cardan joint, and are themselves threaded and will allow only a bolt to pass through the yoke first, then clamp the cap to the yoke, however, these are usually part of the outer flange assembly of a double cardan joint, and typically cant be removed.


Pics here would help others to help you with your quest.


As a Note:
Yes most u-bolts styles are perhaps the most overlooked and often installed incorrectly. Most do have a slight taper to them, and this taper should point inward toward the u-joint. This allows for clearance without binding the u-bolt against the driveshaft when the angles reach the max. Good observation.
Improper installation is also a critical factor towards u-joint failure. These are often over tightened and will turn an otherwise good u-joint bearing into a bushing, and will fail in short time. Remember the caps are bearings, so crushing down on the retainers will cause some binding. Binding leads to heat, and heat leads to failure. Its sort of a hip bone connected to the leg bone type of thing, but one thing does lead to another.

For what it is worth, the u-bolt method of retainer is more desirable than the strap styles.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the info!

The caps I was speaking of are the retainers for a double cardan joint, not the "straps". The yoke I have is designed for U bolts and is non threaded. I hope I didn't tighten them too much! I torqued them pretty decent and rode around town some and retorqued them again. Whats shoudl these U bolts be torqued down to?

Guess I'll have to spray some paint on the flat part of the yoke to keep it from rusting. Just wish I had thought it out before becuase I intentionly left it unpainted thinking it was a mating surface.
 

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Chromo says:

typical torque values are about 15 to 20 lb ft. Most of the time, a torque wrench cant fit in there, so,,,,,,,,you will have to make a very educated guess. The key here is to not distort the bearing cap itself.
Snug them up, and give them a little extra touch without cranking them down. Deffinately not as tight as you can get it, but you dont want them to fall off either.

Good luck.
 
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