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Discussion Starter #1
I was just thinking.. I don't have a 220 circuit ran yet so I can't use my welder..

However I just remembered I have a Generator.. Craftsman.. It has a 220V at 30A outlet on it.. Which my welder is 24 amps and recommends I use a 30A outlet.

Is it "OK" to use until I get my circuit ran, or is the generator really only for lights and stuff without a regulated power supply?


Thanks all.

Edit:

Edit:

Craftsman
10HP
5600 Watts
8600 Surge watts
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Any reason why not? I'm all up for not messing my stuff up.
 

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Call the welder manufacturer and see how big of a generator they recommend for your welder.

As long as the genny is big enough there would not be a issue.
 

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The generator will not like the current surges when you strike the arc. That 8600W at 220 is a 39 amp surge without considering power factor, which I would add another 20% for. I would call the electrician and get that 220V circuit run. It will be cheaper than fried equipment.
 

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The generator will not like the current surges when you strike the arc. That 8600W at 220 is a 39 amp surge without considering power factor, which I would add another 20% for. I would call the electrician and get that 220V circuit run. It will be cheaper than fried equipment.
Exactly, and if you're welding in a garage and have to run your generator outside, you'll have some voltage drop due to your cord length...depending on your situation of course.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The generator will not like the current surges when you strike the arc. That 8600W at 220 is a 39 amp surge without considering power factor, which I would add another 20% for. I would call the electrician and get that 220V circuit run. It will be cheaper than fried equipment.
That's exactly what I wanted to know.. :thumbup If I had the equipment to do it, then I would have, but I don't want to blow stuff up or catch things on fire.

I planned to go get the conduit and other materials this weekend.. I have a couple friends who are electricians.. Just need to call them over after I have everything and have them wire it up.. I plan on runing everything so they just have to walk up.. Wire the panel and cruise.. I'd attempt it but every single time I get close to a hot panel I shock myself. :rofl: Thankfully it's only a 25' run from where the breaker is to where i want to put the outlet..

figuring for going up across and down I'm thinking each run will be roughly 37-40 feet. Multiply that by 3.. So roughly 120' of wire..Plus a junction box. I want to run this circuit to the back room and the driveway so I can use my welder in 2 places..

Man.. Hobbies get expensive.. :thumbup
 

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I would try it and if it works use it until you get the 220 wired in. The worst that will happen is you blow the breaker and find out the generator wont work.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I thought about trying it but I got the 220 wired up already. :thumbup
 

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I've ran my 110v mig off a generator and had no adverse effects on either it's 15 years old and I still use it today. I'm with Waltman try it circut breakers will keep any major damage from happening that's what they're there for plus all your doing is powering up a big dumb transformer and making DC with it it's an not effecient way to make power for welding but it will do in a pinch. Good luck to ya
 
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