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Discussion Starter #1
Grandfather just passed away, so I need a quick lesson on these.
I know I can find stuff on google, but FSB never lets me down



 

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Well, I have the same welder in my tech class... works good for what it is. Welded everything from tube to frames with it.
 

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Kitteh Commandaar!
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I think the first one is a lathe of some sort and the second pic is a welder, more specifically a Lincoln Welder :goodfinge
 

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Lick my balls
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If you have room for the lathe, keep it.

Sorry to haer about the grandfather, but at least you know he loved you.
 

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That lathe is a good one to hang onto if the ways are in good condition. It looks like it's gear driven, rather than belt driven and it's got power feed, can single point threads, etc. I would probably make you an offer on it if it was out this direction. What's the hp and phase?
 

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Formerly vt89gtvert
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Sorry to hear about the loss. If once you get everything in order personally and physically, I might be interested in the welder. Not trying to seam like a buzzard, but just when you are ready...
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The welder is badass. Its the same model number as they got now, it just looks different.
any good web sites besides Lincoln :shrug
The first one is some sort of worthless ancient sewing machine. You should give it to me.
but you don't sew :smilie_slap
The lathe should bring a pretty penny if you clean it up.
If you have room for the lathe, keep it.
I'd like to keep it, learn about it, and use it if possible
Sorry to haer about the grandfather, but at least you know he loved you.
Thanks, he was the toughest guy I know/knew :muscle071
That lathe is a good one to hang onto if the ways are in good condition. It looks like it's gear driven, rather than belt driven and it's got power feed, can single point threads, etc. I would probably make you an offer on it if it was out this direction. What's the hp and phase?
those are the things I don't know, is there a quick guide to all that lingo? :beer
Sorry to hear about the loss. If once you get everything in order personally and physically, I might be interested in the welder. Not trying to seam like a buzzard, but just when you are ready...
Maybe I should have said I need to learn about how to keep and use these things. :beer
Later this summer there will be other weird stuff for sale, not sure if I'll post it on FSB :shrug
 

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those are the things I don't know, is there a quick guide to all that lingo? :beer
The ways are the rails that the carriage(the main structure that moves the tool into/away from the part), cross slide(moves the tool toward/away from the operator) and end working attachment(holds the chuck, tools and centers) are sliding on. If the lathe is plugged into the wall it sure looks like it's a 110v. Still curious about the horsepower. Do you know the manufacturer?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I was told it was 220 at one point, he converted it to 110 for this location
what you think about that power saw?
They don't make them like that any more I'll bet
 

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Look on the back left of the lathe for a plackard with the info/model name and number. The motor h.p. will be on a label on the side of the motor, may have to remove it to see that though. Also try a search for "Atlas" lathe. I'm pretty sure it is not one but, you will find links to other lathe info. The real value is in the tooling/accessories that are with the lathe. Lots of lathes end up with mismatched tooling = useless...
 

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I'm also sorry to read of your loss. Men like your grandfather did much for this world and in turn did much for their families. Just looking at your photos of his well used tools shows he knew his way around a machine shop and could work with his hands....which ensured his family was provided for.

I'd suggest a couple ways to learn how to use this lathe 1. Start reading "Home Machinest" a magazine oriented to folks who have machine equipment in their home shop. 2. Get into a local community college machinest class. If you have the right instructor, you'll learn more in the shortest period of time than trying to "self-teach" yourself.
 

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Lick my balls
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That lathe is a good one to hang onto if the ways are in good condition. It looks like it's gear driven, rather than belt driven and it's got power feed, can single point threads, etc. I would probably make you an offer on it if it was out this direction. What's the hp and phase?
Are you serious? It is a metal lathe. I can't imagine a metal lathe being belt driven and if it was, I sure would not buy it.

It wouldn't take much to convert it to 220, which is better anyways
lathe looks a bit leaky
That is what happens when you use coolant:doh0715::duh
 

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Are you serious? It is a metal lathe. I can't imagine a metal lathe being belt driven and if it was, I sure would not buy it.
School me, oh wise one. Do you think metal lathes were always gear driven? Or do you think there has been a few changes in technology in the last century? Were metal lathes gear driven when leather bands drove all of the equipment in the shop? Goodness!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Any idea how much something like this would weight?
any special concerns when moving it?
Look on the back left of the lathe for a plackard with the info/model name and number. The motor h.p. will be on a label on the side of the motor, may have to remove it to see that though. Also try a search for "Atlas" lathe. I'm pretty sure it is not one but, you will find links to other lathe info. The real value is in the tooling/accessories that are with the lathe. Lots of lathes end up with mismatched tooling = useless...
thanks :beer
I have no clue as to what accessories go with it, there is a 6ft tall self next t oit full of drill bits and other stuff I can't remember.
I'm also sorry to read of your loss. Men like your grandfather did much for this world and in turn did much for their families. Just looking at your photos of his well used tools shows he knew his way around a machine shop and could work with his hands....which ensured his family was provided for.
He was 85, had tons of medical problems, and was still fabing stuff when he had the energy to walk.
I'd suggest a couple ways to learn how to use this lathe 1. Start reading "Home Machinest" a magazine oriented to folks who have machine equipment in their home shop. 2. Get into a local community college machinest class. If you have the right instructor, you'll learn more in the shortest period of time than trying to "self-teach" yourself.
I'm thinking about taking a class in the future, just not enough free time. I'd hate to put it in storage and ruin it with lack of maintance. kinda the point of this thread, don't want any screw ups from my ignorance.
It wouldn't take much to convert it to 220, which is better anyways
I'm sure he saved the 220 parts, just not sure where to look. It's a bit late to ask him :doh0715: :cry
 

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That's a classic Lincoln "Tombstone" welder. 225 Amp A/C stick welder. They're everywhere, and they run for decades.

As far as learning to use the lathe, see if your local community college has an "intern prep" class or something like that for machinists/mold-makers. LMCC in St. Joe used to, my step-dad taught it. I don't know if he still does.

It'll give you the basics, at least.
 
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