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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm removing soaking wet carpet to dry out the truck and replace various seals. When I removed the carpet from the back I came across this. Duct tape covering this large hole right above the gas tank. Probably part of why the carpet was wet. How should I deal with this?

Automotive tire Hood Blue Motor vehicle Bumper



Blue Water Road surface Grey Bird
 

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Ford Hoarder
78 & 92
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Get a "repair patch" some sealant and use some sheet metal screws to bolt the patch back down.
This is also a super handy fuel pump access panel, so I would not do something permanent.
 

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1995 5.8, 2.5" Rough Country Lift, Extended RA's, 4.10's, 33" BFG's
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Somebody hacked a fuel pump access hole. Like Crazy mentioned just do a non permanent patch. Best thing to do would be square up the hole then cut a piece out of a junkyard truck,
 

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Addicted to Junk
85 Bronco, 309ci I6 w/4bbl, np435, 4" lift, 37" Irok NDs, 4.56 w/ Detroit Locker and tru trac
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Somebody hacked a fuel pump access hole. Like Crazy mentioned just do a non permanent patch. Best thing to do would be square up the hole then cut a piece out of a junkyard truck,
Definitely square the hole up and drill a hole in each corner to radius it so cracks dont form.
 

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Yo 92BroncoBlue,
As CrazyBRONCOguy, and JScatt advised.
If no clean Bronco or F Series, etc cargo (pick-up box) area pans sections are available at local yards;
for a YARD SEARCH on-line, I use;
Hollander Quality Replacement Parts | Find Used Auto Parts | Online Locator
A yard that uses Hollander Interchange can search other yards and have it shipped including some Canadian yards.
"...For over eighty years, Hollander has been making the best tool for fast, interchangeable part matches. The new Edition Hollander Interchange contains more interchangeable options than ever before.
The Hollander Interchange provides auto recyclers and auto collectors, rebuilders, and others with the easiest and most comprehensive solution for identifying interchangeable auto parts..." See their yard Directory @ Seller Directory | Used Auto Parts | Hollanderparts
Can select a certain part.
Search: 1992 >Ford > F150 > Rear Body > Pickup Box > 01139A Flareside, Single Fuel Tank


Or
Product Font Rectangle Screenshot Software
 

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'92 Custom w/ '95 MAF 5.0 M/T, 33's, 4.10 LSD
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That's the worst cutout I've ever seen. (Did they start it with a plasma cutter, right above the fuel tank??) But then they went full half-ass and didn't bother covering it. Impressive butchery.
 

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Driving Stuff Henry Built
*90xlt,351w,e4od,1356m*79,400,C6,205,19donors*73,400,np435,d20j twin
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Many of us have cut a hole there for fuel pump access. It makes it so you have access without dropping the tank. Handy on the trail, but convenient at home too. It looks like someone did the hard part already.

As for what to patch it with, I cut a section of floor from a junkyard Bronco. I took that piece over to an f-150 & checked the contour. It was a perfect match, so a piece from a pickup bed would work too.

As for sealing, I like the product that my dad always called "dumdum". It's a putty that comes on a roll or in strips that never dries. So if you have to open it on the trail, it lets go for access, then can be reused to seal it up again.
This Eastwood product looks like the stuff.

This thread has become a gathering place for fuel pump access info. Some good & some bad. Read it all before deciding on how you'll finish up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Many of us have cut a hole there for fuel pump access. It makes it so you have access without dropping the tank. Handy on the trail, but convenient at home too. It looks like someone did the hard part already.

As for what to patch it with, I cut a section of floor from a junkyard Bronco. I took that piece over to an f-150 & checked the contour. It was a perfect match, so a piece from a pickup bed would work too.

As for sealing, I like the product that my dad always called "dumdum". It's a putty that comes on a roll or in strips that never dries. So if you have to open it on the trail, it lets go for access, then can be reused to seal it up again.
This Eastwood product looks like the stuff.

This thread has become a gathering place for fuel pump access info. Some good & some bad. Read it all before deciding on how you'll finish up.
Thanks for the info!
 

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As for sealing, I like the product that my dad always called "dumdum". It's a putty that comes on a roll or in strips that never dries. So if you have to open it on the trail, it lets go for access, then can be reused to seal it up again.
This Eastwood product looks like the stuff.

Dumdum= AKA: butyl rope/rubber and comes in a caulk tube too stays soft and pliable for a long time and seals great - can be messy

I have used the Eastwood rope product and it is probably the best bang for the buck too. I used it to seal heater box to the firewall under the hood.
CRL has butyl in caulk tube that works awesome for sealing a leaking windshield.

I also use brush on seam sealer in a quart can for repairs like this. This is what I usually buy except when it was in the low $30 range a few years ago:
 

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85 Bronco, 309ci I6 w/4bbl, np435, 4" lift, 37" Irok NDs, 4.56 w/ Detroit Locker and tru trac
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That butyl stuff is what they use to seal trans tunnel covers on too. It is still sticky 25-30 years later. Great stuff.
 

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1995 Ford Bronco XLT 5.8l
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Desolate sells a patch kit that comes with nurserts and bolts for easy removal. You could just make it yourself but sometimes buying is easier. Maybe lay a strip of rubber down around the edge of the cutout so when you bolt it down it’ll seal.

 

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I'm not really a fan of the butyl for panels that need removing occasionally. 1) It's rather messy, absorbing carpet shag, pine needles, and anything else crossing its path, and 2) it can require a lot of prying to release, which will bend a panel that doesn't have a fully stamped perimeter.

I cleaned the factory sealant off my transmission tunnel cover last time I had it out, and replaced it with adhesive backed rubber window gasket in the trough. Once the cover is bolted down, that provides a similar seal with no mess. I thought about doing similar for the fuel tank access panel, but I'm not sure I'd get enough compression for it to sit flush, without adding more bolt holes around the perimeter. I'm thinking of laying down a thin silicon bead, letting it dry, then letting its natural tackiness be the barrier once compressed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thank you all for the suggestions. I ordered the piece from Bronco Graveyard. For those of you who are a fan of using butyl what would be the downside of just duct taping the edges of the panel to the bed once the butyl is applied? I suppose to have a more secure connection with screws might be better. I guess I'm weighing no screw holes vs secure connection. Thoughts?
 

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I'm not in the butyl camp. The stuff I use is more like a rope putty, fills gaps, stays soft so you can pull it apart later, & will still work to put it back together. My 1st roll was white & lasted over 30 years. When I couldn't find it I bought some of the strips, which seemed to work the same. I've used it for filling holes in firewalls & other places where you want to keep moisture & fumes out, but don't want a permanent closure. The stuff works good & I see no reason to try anything else.

As for not screwing it down & using duct tape, that doesn't sound good. Most duct tape isn't what it used to be as for longevity. Didn't you find it with duct tape not keeping it closed?

If you look at that thread I linked earlier, they talk about using closed rivnuts to keep moisture out. I think those combined with the rope caulk (dumdum) is a good solution.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I'm not in the butyl camp. The stuff I use is more like a rope putty, fills gaps, stays soft so you can pull it apart later, & will still work to put it back together. My 1st roll was white & lasted over 30 years. When I couldn't find it I bought some of the strips, which seemed to work the same. I've used it for filling holes in firewalls & other places where you want to keep moisture & fumes out, but don't want a permanent closure. The stuff works good & I see no reason to try anything else.

As for not screwing it down & using duct tape, that doesn't sound good. Most duct tape isn't what it used to be as for longevity. Didn't you find it with duct tape not keeping it closed?

If you look at that thread I linked earlier, they talk about using closed rivnuts to keep moisture out. I think those combined with the rope caulk (dumdum) is a good solution.
The hole had only duct tape covering it, no panel. Thanks for the response. When I did pull the tape off as in the pic it was secured very well. It took some pulling to get it off.
 
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