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Roll Tide!
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Okay so here's the rundown: My E4OD tranny is starting to head down hill pretty fast (hard shifting). Also, this morning it wouldn't shift out of park. I could move the shifter into other gears but no movement so i pressed the gas slightly and there was a loud bang and the truck jerked harshly back, (I believe this to be my torque converter, thanks Gillamonster)

I was also told that when I was driving in city traffic that I should turn the overdrive off to take some pressure off the tranny, this confused me.... would it be better on my tranny to turn off the overdrive in traffic? :doh0715:

I know to turn off the overdrive when going up steep hills and towing....
 

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Zombie Hunter
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doesn't matter at this point. If the transmission is on it's way out, it's on it's way out, anything you do now is not going to make it better or get any more time out of it. The only thing you would be doing is reducing it from four shifts to three. First to second to Drive, rather than shifting from first to second to drive to overdrive, it still has to shift through the first two gears.

I never run overdrive. Even on the freeway. The first thing i do when i get in the truck is turn the overdrive off on the shifter. If i don't my transmission jumps between OD and D all the time since the speed limits in the cities around here seem to be at the same pace as my shift points. So it will constantly jump.

On the brief amount of time that i use highways, it's uphill then downhill, then uphill then downhill in about a six mile span, once again, the truck jumps between D and OD, so i just eliminate the OD.

My RPM's run slightly higher, but i trust the motor more than i trust the driveline.
 

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Sayulita Layta!
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The reason you would turn OD off around town is to help prevent the truck from bogging down. The lower the RPM's at speed, the more the tranny slips. Slippage = heat and death to the 'ol E4OD. You really shouldnt have to worry about this if you are stock or have proper gearing. I left OD off when I had stock gearing with my 35s. Now that I have 4.56s, its all GOOD!
 

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Okay so here's the rundown: My E4OD tranny is starting to head down hill pretty fast (hard shifting). Also, this morning it wouldn't shift out of park. I could move the shifter into other gears but no movement so i pressed the gas slightly and there was a loud bang and the truck jerked harshly back, (I believe this to be my torque converter, thanks Gillamonster)

I was also told that when I was driving in city traffic that I should turn the overdrive off to take some pressure off the tranny, this confused me.... would it be better on my tranny to turn off the overdrive in traffic? :doh0715:

I know to turn off the overdrive when going up steep hills and towing....
IMO, leave it alone, and check your MLPS for possible malfunction.
 

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OUT OF BUSINESS / M.I.A
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The reason you would turn OD off around town is to help prevent the truck from bogging down. The lower the RPM's at speed, the more the tranny slips. Slippage = heat and death to the 'ol E4OD. You really shouldnt have to worry about this if you are stock or have proper gearing. I left OD off when I had stock gearing with my 35s. Now that I have 4.56s, its all GOOD!

Totally agree with this---and it's how I drive around town in my '97 F350 crew cab 4x4. I got into a small arguement with somebody here a couple of months ago (can't recall who it was) about allowing the E40D to go into over-drive when putzing around city streets at 30-35 mph. He claimed it was ok to do this---whereas I argued that my research said other wise. When I bought this truck 8 years ago with 55k miles on it I was shocked to discover that many people were losing their trannys at 50-65k miles due to lugging the crap out of them. No less than 10 different forums and individuals said to keep the o/d off around town or I'd be looking at a $3500 repair bill. At this moment mine has 153000 miles on it. Which is pretty fricken good I think. And I'm off to Cabo next week and have no qualms at all about doing 2000 miles in the middle of nowhere.

Fwiw this truck does about 55 mph in third gear, spinning maybe 2300 rpms---which is really nothing. If I need to go faster that's when the o/drive is engaged and she purrs comfortably at 68--72 at around 1700 rpms or so. (give or take).

Hope that helps a bit............


Rick
 

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I got into a small arguement with somebody here a couple of months ago (can't recall who it was) about allowing the E40D to go into over-drive when putzing around city streets at 30-35 mph. He claimed it was ok to do this---whereas I argued that my research said other wise.
IIRC, that was me, and you're still wrong. ;)

If the vehicle is stock, or modified, but done correctly, the transmission won't go into overdrive if you're doing less then about 40. At which point, your engine is generally doing around 1400rpm or more, and that's not lugging the engine.

Mine's got 180k+ on it, with the 302 having 208k on it, and says your information is incorrect.
 

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The reason you would turn OD off around town is to help prevent the truck from bogging down. The lower the RPM's at speed, the more the tranny slips. Slippage = heat and death to the 'ol E4OD. You really shouldnt have to worry about this if you are stock or have proper gearing. I left OD off when I had stock gearing with my 35s. Now that I have 4.56s, its all GOOD!
Also, no.

If you're in overdrive, your torque converter is going to be locked, which means no slippage, unless your converter is bad.

It's not even so much about gearing (a little, yes), but it's about having your PSOM programmed correctly, or having the correct speedo gear in.
 

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IIRC, that was me, and you're still wrong. ;)

If the vehicle is stock, or modified, but done correctly, the transmission won't go into overdrive if you're doing less then about 40. At which point, your engine is generally doing around 1400rpm or more, and that's not lugging the engine.

Mine's got 180k+ on it, with the 302 having 208k on it, and says your information is incorrect.

Ok, let's try this one more time, s'kay? When research on the net and first person testimonials show that running around town in o/d at very low speeds KILLS these trannies like there's no tomorrow, then doesn't that tell you there is an inherent problem somewhere? Now since we both have completely different trucks in this comparison (I have the 460 c.i.) we may be comparing apples to porcupines here. But I am living proof that my driving habits have saved my E40D from a premature death----as opposed to the gawd-knows-how-many other folks have had theirs meet an early, expensive demise. So either you are very lucky, or your engine/vehicle weight/tranny year/manufacturing specs/ratio just happened to work out. Congrats on that, but again you are mistaken that these trucks and trannys will NOT shift up to o/drive at low speeds on flat ground. In fact before I typed this I took the '87 Bronk down the street, left the gear shift in o/d and gently drove on the flats. And THIS truck also will shift up to o/d at 34 mph's. So to recap, I have 2 different Ford trucks, 10 years apart, both with 4 speed trannys, and both will shift up to o/d at low speeds. Why would that be? And better yet, why is that a good thing when we all know that it's hard on trannys to lug them?

Whatever, do what ever the hell you want. But for the others here, I highly suggest some Googling 'Ford automatic tranny problems'. The truth is out there Sculley...............
 

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Your '87 has an AOD, which is a 100% completely different transmission. Nothing about it is alike with an E4OD.

How do you know your driving habits saved your E4OD? You could have driven any other way and it could have had the same outcome. :scratchhe

What part of low speed operation is hard on the transmission? Lugging an engine is bad for the bearings... never heard of lugging the transmission. But I'm sure you're an engineer and all and you know exactly how an automatic transmission works. :thumbup
 

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Your '87 has an AOD, which is a 100% completely different transmission. Nothing about it is alike with an E4OD.

How do you know your driving habits saved your E4OD? You could have driven any other way and it could have had the same outcome. :scratchhe

What part of low speed operation is hard on the transmission? Lugging an engine is bad for the bearings... never heard of lugging the transmission. But I'm sure you're an engineer and all and you know exactly how an automatic transmission works. :thumbup
Actually I'm a gynocologist for a private all female college here in So Cal. Which obviously qualifies me to being an expert on Ford tranny's.

I'm positive that even you can see the corelation there..........:smokin:
 

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Actually I'm a gynocologist for a private all female college here in So Cal. Which obviously qualifies me to being an expert on Ford tranny's.

I'm positive that even you can see the corelation there..........:smokin:
Alright? Well, I'm a BC plant technician, and a mechanic in the shop, who's taken apart and rebuilt several E4ODs... so I guess that puts me right at the level of a gynochologist for knowledge of automatic transmissions. :scratchhe
 

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Alright? Well, I'm a BC plant technician, and a mechanic in the shop, who's taken apart and rebuilt several E4ODs... so I guess that puts me right at the level of a gynochologist for knowledge of automatic transmissions. :scratchhe
Wtf, didn't they offer sarcasm classes in those Joy-zee high schools when you were a kid?.......
 

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If Ford thought it should be that way, they'd have designed it so that the OD lockout was on when you first start the truck, and you had to push the button to allow it to shift to overdrive.


Ford didn't think it should be that way, hence why the trucks operate the way they do. :doh0715:
 

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Satyr of the Midwest
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Do you guys argue over what's the better napkin print design, too? :rofl:

Just to satiate your curiosity, I looked in the Ford Tech CD literature to find this:

(P) Park -- The transmission is in NEUTRAL with the output shaft (7060) locked. This prevents the vehicle from rolling forward or backward. For safety reasons, the vehicle parking brake should be used in addition to the transmission PARK position. Do not select the PARK position until the vehicle comes to a complete stop, because it mechanically locks the output shaft. The engine may be started in the PARK position. This is the only selector position in which the ignition key can be removed.

(R) Reverse -- Enables the vehicle to be operated in a rearward direction at a reduced gear ratio. There is no engine braking in reverse.

(N) Neutral -- The transmission is in NEUTRAL, and the output shaft is not locked to the case.

((D)) Overdrive -- Normal driving position for most highway driving conditions and maximum economy. This position provides all automatic shifts including the application and release of the torque converter clutch.

((D)) Drive with Transmission Control Switch Activated -- This position provides all automatic shifts, including the application and release of the torque converter clutch, except for the shift to overdrive. This position can be used when overdrive is not desired, such as when traveling in hilly/mountainous terrain or when going into a strong headwind.

(2) Manual Second -- Selection of this position at start-up provides only second gear operation. (Selection at higher vehicle speed results in temporary third-gear followed by an automatic downshift to second gear, which provides engine braking.)

(1) Manual First -- Selection of this position at start-up provides only low (first gear) operation. Selection at higher vehicle speed results in a downshift to second gear. An automatic downshift to first gear will occur once the vehicle speed drops below approximately 56 km/h (35 mph) (for diesel, 48 km/h [30 mph]). This position is desired for maximum engine braking when descending steep grades.
Just a personal observation, I HATE how low Ford has set the minimum speed for OD. It should've been about 45-47 mph, with torque converter locking ONLY after the shift to OD, or ONLY above 35 while the TCS is activated. Hoping to do just that with a Moates unit.
 
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