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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Trying to figure out where these 2 connectors go (the ones that go on bolts and then you throw a nut on over them.. not sure what that'd be called).

They are on the body harness that contains the o2 sensor. There's 2 connectors... one smaller and one bigger. I think the small one connects to the altenator to go with the other wire (but not sure... there's heatshrink on it that says it goes to a switch lead) and then I thought the other went to the ground bolt on the block but it doesn't fit over it.

Any ideas? Last hurtle in getting this beast started. :)

Thanks

This is on a 1993 Ford Bronco
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Here's an image of what i'm looking for. Would really appreciate if someone could check where they lead. After I get them in I can get this beast started again. Thanks :)

 

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Satyr of the Midwest
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That whole loom/harness section goes down along the passenger side oil pan rail, to the starter and oxygen sensor.

The starter connections are those eyelets, and it should be fairly obvious which is the main starter cable and which is the signal wire.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
That whole loom/harness section goes down along the passenger side oil pan rail, to the starter and oxygen sensor.

The starter connections are those eyelets, and it should be fairly obvious which is the main starter cable and which is the signal wire.
I can't believe I forgot about the starter! Makes sense now. I really appreciate the help. Can't wait to get it started later today. :)

Thanks.
 

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Super Moderator
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yo,
Good job, again, Sig!

==
Following for general info & posterity in case sites go down someday...
Basic Wiring Diagram & Instructions for PMGR (Permanent Magnet Gear Reduction) 92-96
Source: by Texas Industrial Electric Co. http://texasindustrialelectric.com/techinfo_fd.asp

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Relay & Solenoid Parts Break-Out & Wiring Diagrams in 92-96 V8 PMGR (Permanent Magnet Gear Reduction
by Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at http://www.supermotors.net/vehicles/registry/media/285644_1

Relay Types, Early & Late Model Year pics & Internal Wiring Diagrams; "...The top 2 (late style) use parallel bolts as terminals, so the copper washer inside always touches the flat bolt heads. The others (early style) use bolts perpendicular to the relay's axis, so the washer touches the sides of the bolt heads. But if the bolt is accidentally rotated (as during overtorquing), the washer will only touch a corner, causing high resistance, arcing, and welding. That's why the new style is far superior. The continuous-duty relay has a metal housing to dissipate the heat, and its S2 terminal allows its coil to be fully isolated (for reverse-polarity duty). Note that all Main terminals are electrically interchangeable. But on the newer relays, they are mechanically different in that the plastic housing restricts access to M2 slightly more, indicating that it should have only 1 wire attached. It's common for these to be MISidentified as "solenoids", but a solenoid operates a mechanism, and a starter solenoid is ON the starter; a relay is an electrical switch. Many '90-up Fords have both a starter solenoid & a starter relay, so it's important to differentiate them. If the details or text are too small, click the pic to view the original (super) size..."
Source: by Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at Relay Types, Early & Late Model Year pics & Internal Wiring Diagrams; "...The top 2 (late style) use parallel bolts as terminals, so the copper washer inside always touches the flat bolt heads. The others (early style) use bolts perpendicular to the relay's axis, so the washer touches the sides of the bolt heads. But if the bolt is accidentally rotated (as during overtorquing), the washer will only touch a corner, causing high resistance, arcing, and welding. That's why the new style is far superior. The continuous-duty relay has a metal housing to dissipate the heat, and its S2 terminal allows its coil to be fully isolated (for reverse-polarity duty). Note that all Main terminals are electrically interchangeable. But on the newer relays, they are mechanically different in that the plastic housing restricts access to M2 slightly more, indicating that it should have only 1 wire attached. It's common for these to be MISidentified as "solenoids", but a solenoid operates a mechanism, and a starter solenoid is ON the starter; a relay is an electrical switch. Many '90-up Fords have both a starter solenoid & a starter relay, so it's important to differentiate them. If the details or text are too small, click the pic to view the original (super) size..."
by Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at http://www.supermotors.net/registry/media/809585
 

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yo, is that smaller gauge wire w/yellow wire & small eylet spliced onto it a red/w/black tracer?
 
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